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I waited two years. The wood naturally aged, but still took stain just fine. I stained it two more times before I had to strip it and start over.


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I am a painter and I build also and I personally will not warranty the work unless it's after 6 months. Pressure treated (PT) lumber takes months to shrink and re-contract on and off so the paint will crack and not adhere correctly. Also, the PT you buy at Lowe's or Home Depot gets moved around a lot so you may have a load of wood with boards that are weeks ...


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I build decks for a living. Setting your post in concrete as you would a fence post will work just fine, as long as you use Sono tubes or The Post Collar. You want no earth to wood contact! Or use pier blocks. In the pic you have a ledger securing the deck to the house. You can use 6" pier blocks. Place a shovel full of concrete, even fence post mix under ...


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Oh believe you me, pressure washing will remove the stain (deck paint) with a decent pressure washer. I just did it on 220 sq/ft. took about 4 hrs but it's clean enough so now I can finish it with a quick sanding using an orbital upright sander. You just have to give it a week or so of sunny hot weather to dry before you stain it again. Splash a few ...


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Without seeing a picture it is hard to say. My experience with wooden furniture is that when you put it outdoors bad things happen, especially if screws and nails are used to hold it together. It is pretty rare to see a deck older than 10 years that does not look like a potential termite habitat. In general, putting corner braces under the railing would ...


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Should be pretty simple. You just need a way to gently raise the railing up enough to get the block underneath. I would do this slowly over a number of days and raise it the absolute minimum amount. Once you get there, slide the block underneath, slowly remove the support, and you're done.


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The issue with decks is that they are outdoors, which means they will tend to expand and contract a lot with moisture and temperature changes. This will cause nails to come loose. The best thing to use is a bolt and washer design, because it can be made to flex naturally. Since it would be time-consuming and costly to bolt down every single board on the ...


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Not the best answer, but: Use screws on the top boards where people will be walking barefoot. Every kid has had a wicked gash from nails (naturally) poking up a bit. Use big a** nails to attach your cross beams to your main structure. Nails are only good at holding against a shear, i.e. nails should always be (and only be) parallel with the ground. Use ...


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Agreed, use screws. Nails will pull out, and the shrink/swell cycle as the wood dries then gets wet then dries again can work the nails out of the holes, and make the holes slightly looser. Screws can't be pushed back out. They'd have to be twisted out, and the lengthwise force on the flat helical edge of the thread from tightening the screw down will remain ...


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Screws hold better over time, so are preferable. Use a long (3") exterior grade screw and you'll be fine. I'd avoid stainless as they're expensive and sometimes brittle. If the underlying joists are in rotten shape, come back and ask about them.



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