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Concrete does not have very good tensile strength. Rebar is laid in such a manner that it adds tensile strength in the concrete. Depending on the size and weight load the pier/footer assembly is expected to support and the length of the pier, it could be reinforced in the following manner. A rebar circle in the footer to prevent weight spread from ...


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I'm not sure what your level of expertise is, but it's important to note that footings and piers are two different things (no offense intended). Usually for a deck piers will suffice on their own, provided they are wide enough (typically 12" is good) and deep enough to go below the frostline in your area (3 ft deep is a good rule of thumb). The main ...


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This is a reasonable concern, but not necessarily a problem. It is not uncommon to have concrete forms the way you describe. The solution depends largely on the consistency of the concrete mix. A very wet mix will run all over the place, a very dry mix will hardly flow out the end at all. This property is known as the "slump" of concrete, measured in inches. ...


2

To me it sounds like boilerplate contract talk. Normally, when you get a building permit and there is a final inspection on something and it passes you will then get an occupancy certificate. Can't say I've ever seen it for a deck, but depending on your municipality or whatever "authority having jurisdiction" requires, maybe you do need a certificate of ...


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I have used a gurney on my decking taking away old paint comes up a treat Remember not to get to close if it is a powerful one as this could start ripping up the timber You can purchase a decent one from Bunnings for around $200 then I'm sure your use it on other areas as well


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The wood looks to be in good shape; this is fortunate. I think your best bet is to use a large drum sander from a rental place; just make sure all the nails/screws are sunk below the level of the boards. If you use small power tools, it will take a lot of time, effort, and sandpaper. If you plan to re-use the spindles and they are painted, a grinder worked ...


0

My son and our scout troop did a gazebo just before he turned 18 he is now 35. Some buddies and I have a prayer group down there when the weather is nice. I look at those boards, the smile is down with a screw and two galvanized nails at each joint. that deck is very flat. I am working on a deck now. I cut a top hand rail out of a plank and left it to put up ...


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You want to attach the ledger to the edge of a concrete pad? Sounds like a terrible idea to me. It's possible that an engineer could have designed a way to carry the load through the pad and into the ground, but that would have to have been done before pouring the pad. Attaching the ledger to an existing pad, will almost certainly crack, split, or ...


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Here in Norway the local 'wisdom' is to install the pressure treated timber one season and stain it the next. As a builder I agree with some of the above comments that the timber can take a considerable time to dry out. However, a few weeks of good weather should get it dry enough to take a finish, but I'd use a moisture metre and check the (finish) ...


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You do not need water proofing in between the ledger and the rim joist, but the joint needs protected some how. Flashing, roofing membrane, etc. And what ever it is needs to go under the siding and over the ledger in a continuous fashion with no seams at the ledger. Tar paper is not enough. Metal, EPDM, etc is what is needed.


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I've talked to Behr about this stain using a pressure sprayer for application. The Behrs is too thick for my sprayer, but they said I could use 6 oz of water per gallon to thin it. I'd think spraying a damp deck would only help the wood absorb it deeper and better. My opinion only, but I've a small piece of deck I'm going to experiment on.


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Move the deck to the right, so that all main beams are continuous (move it up, to similarly simplify the notch-out, if possible). It'd make construction much easier and need less piles (especially some of those piles that would be adjacent to a tree; roots). Red lines= entire deck moved to the right to make the beam that hits the center cutout, continuous ...


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I would suggest using software to determine a reasonable design. Lowe's has an online deck designer. There are lots of others, too, like Design-a-Deck. The most obvious omission from the design is that there are no beams. Where is the house? Although railing posts can theoretically be slapped on anywhere, the layout of the posts will change its aesthetics ...


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If conditions are hot and dry, my experience is 24 hours is plenty. As long as it is dry to the touch you should be ok. A quick note on the stain itself. Two years ago I discovered Behr Deckover. This product is more expensive than traditional stains and goes on thick. However, after two years not a crack or blemish. Looks like it was just applied. ...


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Most oil-based deck stains need at least 24 hours of dry time. High humidity and/or low temperatures will increase that time, so will over-applying the stain. I would not apply it unless I was fairly confident that I had at least 48 hours with no rain. Better to wait.



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