New answers tagged

0

For framing a deck where you cannot see the nails, an external product is desired. A galvanized framing nail will not rust where a standard framing nail will rust and potentially eventually fail. For areas you CAN see, I prefer screws, as they won't pull out and can be screwed flush. It may also be worth it to rent a compressor and framing nailer for a ...


-1

cedar is soft, grit not critical, I would use 150


0

Yes it's a terrible and dangerous idea to mount it on a wood deck. The muffler is within six to 8 inches of base and it will, under the wrong circumstances, set the deck on fire. Check the install manual. It will require fireproof base, preferably concrete.


2

when you are building things 24 feet up and asking these kind of questions, it should be self evident you need to hire someone to do it for you or at the very least handle the technical design and ensure that what gets built is inspected and checked to make sure it matches the design specifications. do yourself and any of your future guests and neighbours ...


0

Assuming your deck is somewhat modern and properly designed and built, it can easily handle a live load of 13 pounds per square foot (no extra footings required, no need to worry about aligning the table legs over joists, etc). That said, I am assuming your deck is somewhat modern and properly built. You should consider paying a structural engineer to take ...


1

The tree will generally grow larger in diameter centered around the existing trunk....at least for the foreseeable future. Larger / older trees may at times grow out more to one side versus another but the factors that cause them to do that are probably complex and may have more to do with how the canopy of the tree develops or how the tree gets damaged or ...


0

Post longevity: Concrete, below frostline (varies with where you are), with a footing, reinforced with steel rebar kept 2" from the face of the concrete. Use brackets or pads to keep wood from touching concrete aboveground. Hole: Cheap, or Lazy? Cheap - post hole digger (clamshell type) or mattock and shovel (depends how hard the clay is when you try to ...


1

It is normal for that type of post in the south. To treat the wood and not affect the color use a linseed based sealer. The applicator I've linked to is only intended as a reference as there are several manufacturers and styles of rough surface applicators. Linseed Oil Linseed Oil Rough Surface Applicator


1

You're going to want to remove the trim joist, and let the new joists rest on the support beam. The other end of the joists will rest on whatever new support structure you add.


1

The purpose of a ledger board is to give you surface onto which you can nail/attach the rest of the deck (and flashing to keep water out of a house- usually). Your question is, do you need it for attaching two decks. I think the answer to this is a decision for personal convenience, tools, or need. I personally don't undersand the use of a ledger board here ...


2

Think of it like 1) taller joists, or 2) the second level of a house (without the added load of a second floor). There's no reason why the load from the upper level can't be transferred through the lower level to the footings. As to size, the upper deck can be as large as the lower deck, and if there's no cantilever on the lower deck the upper can extend ...


2

Not sure what you are asking, but the footings supporting the deck structure are in the ground under the posts that hold up the beams. Footing size, post size, beam size, joist size are all engineered to support the weight of the structure,and any distances spanned. If you look at some of the other photos on the website they show posts under the outer edge ...


0

Yes, it's common to have deck posts at irregular intervals for various reasons--basement windows and doors, landscape features, sidewalks, etc. The important consideration is that each span is designed properly for load. It may be the case that you have beams of differing size.


0

here in ontario, you are not permitted to use 4x4 posts on a deck, and nor should you. use 6x6 and make sure they sit on metal brackets to connect them to the concrete posts. bearing in mind everything about structural design is based on local conditions and materials used, i would offer this... 4x8 beams at max 5 ft centers would be plenty strong here ...


2

If you pair the beams up, you should glue them with construction adhesive. Just nailing or screwing them together won't really distribute the load across both beams. Although; you're probably not planning on hanging or resting anything on just one beam and expecting the other beam to help with the load anyway. A pair of 2x8 beams are going to be 3" wide ...


2

Those pier blocks or deck blocks are a waste of money. It's not going to be as difficult to dig a few holes and install some real posts now as it will be after the deck is complete and has sunken (unevenly). They might be okay for a light duty shed or dog house, but nothing significant, like a deck. Edit based on comment:


4

Water will raise the grain of your nice, smooth decking, requiring a re-sand. Also, rain will soak into the wood, requiring a significant dry-time delay before sealing. Yes, you should tarp it.


0

Pretreating the wood with a UV absorber (like bis(Biphenyl)triazine or a benzotriazole) will be helpful. UV Boost or other UV protectants will help with whatever stain or sealant you use. You can also mix light inhibitors with stain or sealant.


2

These brackets will also work for composite material. The composite material might be harder on a cheap drill bit, but so long as you can drill a hole through the deck, you can mount a bracket to it.


0

I realize this is a late answer, and I hope your pergola still looks good. However the structure appears to be under built not only for strength but also for esthetics. The construction would be much stronger if the posts were 6x6 and the trimmers were perhaps 2x10. 2x8 joists notched in by 2 or 3 inches would be good and leave the trimmers uncut. To ...


1

Rubber tile or mat would be one simple approach - see duckboards for another method/approach in polymers or sometimes treated wood. Given a solid, correctly sloped concrete substrate, pressure-treated 2x4 sleepers and a deck with no posts, etc. should work just fine - the 2x4's can even be laid flat, since the concrete deck is taking the load directly. ...


2

Sooner or later the splining will deteriorate, and whatever sealant you put in may as well. Also, you are creating little pools in the gaps that may be breeding grounds for mosquitos in wet weather. Have you considered a waterproof underlayer instead of sealing the seams? You could use any of various roof panels, such as pvc, polycarbonate, asphalt ...


1

Ordinarily, I'd get 10% extra for a job like you describe. Given the custom setup, I'd seriously consider 15%, and maybe maybe if it wasn't outrageously cost-prohibitive, going for 20%. Splits, knots, and if you live in my world, mis-cuts happen. It would break my heart to have to go back for one more stick... Plus, if you get way too much, then you'll ...


0

I have power washed my teak and it takes off the gray, putting teak oil on after it looks great. however I did not take the next step and seal it and the gray came back. Next time I will muster the energy and patience to seal it as well


0

its butyl sealant. it still works fine, but nowadays you can use a polyurethane sealant for superior results.


1

On my deck, bird poop tends to happen where the good tree branches for hanging out in are, particularly near the bird feeder. So I'd start by looking up and asking "What's up there (or nearby) to make pooping right there popular?" If I minded more, I'd start by moving the bird feeder. If I still was being bothered, it might be time to remove a tree (we ...


1

Give the birds somewhere better to roost and poop. Put up a clothesline or other string-type thing over a patch of ground that could benefit from fertilization. The birds will roost on the string and poop on the ground, fertilizing it. Now you have a clean deck and your soil is receiving a regular infusion of minerals, particularly phosphorous, which is ...


1

I have great luck with a motion activated sprinkler Something like this keeps the geese out of my pool, It should work for your deck also. Cleaning the stains may take a strong deck cleaner but not knowing the type of paint I would hose it off and try a little dish soap with a scrub brush to clean it off.



Top 50 recent answers are included