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Pour your concrete first and set the preformed pier on of the concrete to get the post bottom about 4 inches above grade. No sonotube needed.


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As a highly-regulated hobby, pretty much everything about DIY remodeling requires a permit. This is generally more true the more structural the project and the bluer the state you live in. However, among DIYers, permit requirements are commonly ignored with no consequences, usually because nobody can see you doing the work. However, common sense dictates ...


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At the point where someone wonders, "Is a building permit required?" the answer is usually, Yes. The only definitive answer will come from the local building department.


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Location specific advice is generally considered off topic as per the [faq] but, that said... Pretty much anything you do to a building "requires" a permit. Whether or not you actually GET one is a different question, but a blanket "yes, probably" applies here. But that said - a permit only applies to the work being done. If you get a permit for a new ...


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If your foundation is sound you only need to ensure that the grade allows any surface water to flow away. Earth is designed to absorb water, and foundations are designed to be in contact with moist earth. The only legitimate application of plastic is as a moisture barrier against poured cement. What you've done here with plastic serves no practical ...


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At a minimum, all the horizontal surfaces should be prepared. My method of choice has always been to use a pressure washer and wood cleaner. If it is particularly bad you can take a firm nylon bristled broom/scrubber and help work it in. Once the cleaner has been on for a few minutes (check the label) pressure wash the deck clean, it is the easiest and ...


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You can buy a liquid stripper that is formulated to remove old deck stain. Rent a pressure washer from the hardware store. Use a pump sprayer to spray the stripper, and use a stiff nylon brush on a pole to loosen the old stain. Pressure wash until the deck is clean. It should only take a few hours. Allow it to dry for one week before staining. DO NOT SAND ...


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The picture shows a "semi-transparent oil-based stain" over very pretty and smooth wood. Probably expensive lumber! If the wood looks good, the semi-transparent stain will look good. Do not use any clear coats as they disintegrate under UV and you will have a nightmare on your hands.


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1 full year is usually enough time before staining treated lumber. If you are worried about it wait one more year. When the wood starts to change colors is a sure sign it is okay.


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It soundless like the previous layer of stain was not ready for re-stain. That is why the new stain is not drying. It will eventually dry (maybe a month) but you will be unable to use deck in meantime. oops. Next time try a water-test to see if stain is actually absorbing or repelling water. If water beads-up on it still you cannot stain yet.


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Semi-solid stain (Cabot's) is a great choice over untreated pine. Pressure wash and allow to dry. If you want to brighten the wood (so it is not grey) you can buy a "Wood Brightener" and apply when you pressure wash and by using a stiff nylon scrub brush on a pole. Do not sand! Allow to dry for 1 week. Apply with a 4" deck brush on a broom handle (one ...


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Pressure wash (use bleach/Jomax -- read the directions first) and rinse. Allow to dry for one week. Don't add moisture the day before! Sweep off any debris and stain. (Usually wait 24-48 hrs after staining before light traffic). SIDENOTES: Wear vinyl/latex gloves that can be discarded. Wear old clothes. Work in shade or cooler times of day when ...


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I doubt this will help you now seeing as its been over a year but I would say that every product I've ever used says "apply to clean dry surface" or something to that effect, even water borne stuff. Which is to say that you'll get the best penetration and adhesion with wood that's perfectly dry. If you're using a product that has a staining effect you'll ...


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Lots of other good tips provided as answers so far, but the one thing no one has mentioned is that a drill is actually the wrong tool to use for driving screws. Sure, they work and lots of people use them, but the best tool to use would be an impact driver: An impact driver has much higher torque than a drill does, and rather than using a twisting motion ...


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Try replacing your loose screws with Torx head screws, which are much more resistant to stripping: By design, Torx head screws resist cam-out better than Phillips head or slot head screws. Where Phillips heads were designed to cause the driver to cam out, to prevent overtightening, Torx heads were designed to prevent cam-out. These screws are also ...


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Some tips Use the correct sized bit for the screw head. This really makes a huge difference. Some bits are much more accurately made than others. Buy a new one. Lubricate the screw. I have a tin of automotive grease I use for this but I've read you should use petroleum jelly (e.g. Vaseline). This quick and easy to do, just dip the srew before inserting. ...


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From what you are describing you are using the wrong drill bit or not applying sufficient pressure. Make sure you have the right # drill bit for the screws. The wrong bit will strip the heads making it difficult to extract or to drive the screws further in. If you are using the right drill bit, stand directly over the screw and apply sufficient pressure ...



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