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If I was going to notch, I would do it on once side and keep the boards together. Another way instead of notching is to use metal connectors to hold the beam on top of the post. That was suggested to me in one of my posts: Simpson Strong-Tie LCE4. Link


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You can use a router or a dado blade in your table saw, or a surface plane to trim the bottom of the posts.


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I really prefer post bases for decks over putting the posts in concrete; it's a much better way of going. I like the beefy ones like the EPB66HDG, but Simpson makes a lot of different ones. Here's a trick for getting them right. Dig the footing holes, and then temporarily attach the connectors to the beam. Put the beam on the ground directly under where it ...


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The deck builder is correct. Notching the upright provides a shelf for transferring the weight of the horizontal members onto the uprights. I'd rather spend my time on a deck supported by thick posts instead of a certain number of galvanized carriage bolts.


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I'd suggest a 2 piece corner connector like a Simpson Strong-Tie LCE4. Link. This will transfer your load to the post below. The same connector could be used for your roof-bearing post. Or you could move the roof post in a tiny bit and use an AC connector (same link). I'd also add some diagonal bracing from your posts for a little bit of added security. ...


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No, you cannot repair them. If a large concrete structure is falling apart, it means the foundation is not good. Putting a deck over it to hide the disaster is probably a good idea. Obviously, you should make footings below the frost line for your deck, unless you want the same thing to happen to it. Personally I would probably build the deck and then sell ...


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Wood or composite is a great choice for it's ease of install. You can use metal post in small diameter concrete footings (6-8" x depth below frost depth) if you are worried about post rot. Should be able to ledger into the side of the concrete with some concrete bolts. Trick is to leave a gap between any ledgers and what they ledger to. If this cannot be ...


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Rent a drum sander and run it in line with the boards. You can take off a large amount of wood in short order depending on the grit of paper you use. Then use a sanding disc with a backer on a grinder for detail work where the drum will not go. We used 36 grit to bring some weathered wood back; probably took of over 1/4" off the top in that case! Total ...


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It is unlikely you can stain it. The paint soaks into the wood and stains it, so it will probably look really bad if you strip it. Also, I can't even imagine striping a deck. I have stripped doors and it is an insane amount of nasty work. Strip a whole deck, Jeez, what a nightmare.


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That's a pretty cute little porch. It's funny how you have it all taken up with stuff. It's quite a drop off there on the manhole side. If it were me, the priority would be to build steps of some kind there--or a railing. Anything that is well-drained will not rot. Rot only occurs when something sits in water. You could certainly deck the porch over if ...


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All you need to do is replace the top of the rails, stair treads, and the decking. The rest can be sanded. Use oil based paint or a marine paint. DO NOT use an epoxy or latex in Toronto. There are too many freeze cycles. This is a one day job if you have a few buddies. You do not need a permit in most places to repair existing structures to a point. I ...


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It is a little small, but yes you can support a 6x6 post on a 10" diameter concrete pedestal. However, any steel hardware you embed in the concrete to attach to the post needs to have proper clearance from the edge of the concrete. Code requires 2" clearance. Something like a Simpson PBS66 would work. Make sure you consolidate the concrete well, so you ...


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It depends what the joists and supports are like, if you can't tell then get an engineer over to your house to check them for you, for rebuild jobs like that you should check with you bylaws officer anyways, some places require permits and inspections before and after you do deck rebuilds. They will be able to tell you what you can and can't do, just go down ...


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Depends on many factors. Assuming it is structurally sound, which we can't know, then it depends on Budget Aesthetic taste use level climate And perhaps more, but that's what I can think of now. I've seen many decks in that type of shape rehabilitated with a good pressure washing and some nice exterior stain. However, I've also redone a deck like ...


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This is not something that's easy to tell from pictures. Things to check for- loose boards, boards that are punky and soft, or boards that have cracked around their fasteners and now move. You want to check for pieces of deck boards coming up. It appears that someone has used non-galvanized screws to attach the top rail- at the very least that needs to be ...


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Yes, your deck is a bit tired. I don't think anybody can tell you whether to re-do or re-hab without seeing it, but these are the sorts of things I think about on a job like this: Safety: are any boards going to break any time soon? Are they excessively rotted? Can they support an adult bouncing on them? Do you walk around in bare feet, and are slivers a ...



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