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I zoomed into to the picture and I see writing on the plywood on either side of the punch down block. Many labels such as "master bedroom", "xxxx bedroom", "office", "study", and "kitchen" should surely help to distinguish where most of the cables are routed. Through a process of elimination you may be able to go right to the one to disconnect for testing in ...


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Is your 66 block configured with bridge clips? If so, just remove the bridge clips and your many CAT5 cables will be isolated from each other, you can individually probe them to find the one you want, then reinstall the bridge clips. I'm assuming your 66 block is not configured like that? How is it configured? Can you include a picture?


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Since I don't think it will make much difference either way, performance wise. I'd think about convenience, and ease of troubleshooting. To me, it makes sense to have all the equipment in a single location. If you have a problem, the provider is going to ask you to reboot all the equipment. If doing so requires visiting multiple locations, it's ...


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It doesn't matter. Both solutions are within normal operational parameters, so they'll all be fine. There are some issues worth considering but they're not technical: Convenience of placement. Put modem as close to the router as possible, so you wouldn't have to keep running between them every time the internet is down and you need to tell if it's your ...


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I think your configuration (despite the apparent confusion in some earlier comments) is: coax to cable modem, then CAT6 from cable modem to a router, then CAT6 from router to point of use. RG6 coax, which is used by CATV systems, has an attenuation of ~ 6dB per 100ft (@ 1000MHz). CAT6 has an attenuation of about 9dB per 100ft (@ 200MHz). All other things ...


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Ethernet is designed to carry a digital signal with no measurable degradation over runs of 100 meters or less. Television coax was designed to carry analog signals over thousands of feet with signal degradation kept low enough that humans won't notice it. It's used to carry digital signals now, but it wasn't designed for it. In general, a long Ethernet ...


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Coax is designed to carry cable TV for hundreds, even thousands of feet. Ethernet not so much.** Though for a <50 foot run it's not going to make much difference either way - the smart play is to favor the most convenient and least intrusive location which produces [edit:] harmony among the occupants regardless of gender, race, creed, color, sexual ...


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No, not a bit. Twisted pair cables are HIGHLY resistant to interference pickup. Furthermore, DC does not cause interference, since it is basically an unchanging current, so there's no change in magnetic fields from it to cause interference (other than when turned on, and off - and the twisted pair cables will reject that interference by design, anyway.) I ...


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The problems you are trying to solve -- so is everybody else. There are a lot of consumer products on the market aiming to solve the "how do I put my TV here" problem. Their "universal solvent" seems to be ethernet or WiFi. You're saying pre-run all the above wires to an appropriate central place - somewhere a wife would authorize a bunch of tech gear to ...


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That is a Belden IBDN QCBIX1A4 BIX Distribution Strip with 4 pair markings. A datasheet can be found here. This product line was originally owned by Nortel, so you might see Nortel labels in your panel. It's essentially a 4-pair splicing strip with 110 style punch down terminals - every pair of wires punched down on one side are extended to the other side ...


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That is a "110" punch-down strip. You need a punch-down tool to terminate to it. I can't see if there is a color code pattern on that strip but there will be an area for each 4-pair cable to terminate. Something like this is a bit easier to follow. T568B is pretty much industry standard for things like a home network. Thing is, you cannot use that ...



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