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34

First off, your cabling doubles as your telephone wiring, so 2 per room is reasonable. Put a jack anywhere you think you may need a phone, computer, or media device (TV/Boxee/game console/etc). If you know you are going to likely need a couple at some particular spot (eg, a home office, or your main TV watching area) then you can do that as well. Run all ...


23

You have good answers so far, but I have several items that I don't think have been covered yet. I will start by recapping. Number of Cables per room Cat5e (and cat6) can be used for telephone, both the old school phone and VoIP phones. This makes it easier to not have to worry about running as many different types of cables. I would highly suggest going ...


16

Cat6 is capable of very high speeds (by today's standards; hi 2021!), but only within a bunch of additional constraints over lower-speed cable. Especially difficult is terminating the cable. When you untwist enough to terminate, it's easy to expose yourself to interference. Some people buy long, pre-terminated Cat6 and pull that, instead of pulling bulk ...


13

Looking in 2011 National Electric Code Changes of Interest, they reference NFPA 90A-2009 : Section 4.3.4 of NFPA 90A-2009 states that “Wiring shall not be installed in air ducts” unless it is “directly associated with the air distribution system and does not exceed 1.22m (4 ft).” I don't have access to the full code, but just in the notes on the ...


12

I believe it is splitting the signal, each output will have a specific loss associated. Some splitters will unevenly split the signal (commonly called a tap), which is handy to give a better signal to a longer run or to the cable modem. You can get a straight through connector at any HI store. That said, even these will have some loss of signal, just no ...


12

I would not recommend these. I researched them a few years ago when building and opted to just do them all individually. Coax (Quad shield RG6), cat 5e, cat 3, and speaker wire. It was actually more cost effective to buy them all in 500-1000' spools individually, than to buy a lot of multicable. Plus, the interference can be an issue. You could combine ...


10

As others have mentioned, there may or may not be stuff in the wall obstructing your plan. But most likely not (insulation it the most likely, but should not stop you). Find an area between the studs and cut a hole in the wall where your box will go as other have described. Then drill a 3/4" - 1" hole in top plate within the same stud cavity. That's the ...


10

Couple problems I see. First is the textured ceiling. You'll never be able to open that up and patch it without being obvious, the texture is something that just isn't done these days. Second, the exterior wall should have insulation in it, so you'll end up fishing the line through insulation and the vapor barrier. Instead, I'd suggest running the line ...


10

Before you spend too much time and money on this, buy a new wireless router. They've come a long way. When finishing my basement I added two communication drops to each room and...never used them. Wireless was fine. What's more important than the cable is that you have an easily accessible way to run what you need at a later date. Smurf tube is a common ...


10

It's not real critical. When wiring phone centers we used metal raceways (or a thrown-together wood one) in the ceiling, but for my house I used pipe clamps like the one you posted at about 4' spacing. I like to add a wrap of double-sided velcro around bundles going to the same box, also about every 4'. Near the demarcation point I might use a few screw-in ...


10

What I have yet to find a solid answer on is what is typically run to the keypads. Do I run cat5/6, or use the same security wire (or both)? I recommend running 22/4 and cat5e from the security panel to the keypads. That provides lots of options. Once I run the wires to each window, where do I leave the wire? I recommend leaving a coil of wire ...


9

National Electrical Code 2008 300.22 Wiring in Ducts, Plenums, and Other Air-Handling Spaces. (B) Ducts or Plenums Used for Environmental Air. Only wiring methods consisting of Type MI cable, Type MC cable employing a smooth or corrugated impervious metal sheath without an overall nonmetallic covering, electrical metallic tubing, flexible ...


8

Whether shielding is strong enough to protect your data or not (I've not heard it is) I would think it's rare that EVERYTHING in a multi-cable is going between the exact same points A & B in the same order. Lights connect switch-to-fixture, power outlets can run a loop while network needs to take each jack back to the closet. I wired co-ax through a ...


8

I think I'd look for the outside spliter and run the cable around the outside of the house under the edge of the siding and try to enter as close as possible through the wall behind the TV. If the spliter is indoors, run a line back outdoors and around. BMitch is correct, you will never be able to fish that distance without opening the ceiling, and cutting ...


8

What about running it along the underside of that shelf that runs around the perimeter of the room? Just drill through the wall underneath the shelf and between some studs, and run the wire tucked under the shelf all the way back against the wall. You won't be able to see it unless you're sitting on the floor.


8

2 Cat5e drops to each bedroom. You can put them in the same faceplate; you can also put your coax cable for the tv / receiver in that panel also (including phone) - Leviton makes face plates that accept from 1 to 6 universal connections (this can be rj45, rj11, coax, etc...) You need a switch regardless to break out your modem (be it DSL, Fiber, cable ...


8

"No Volume Limit" Advantage of Open-back Boxes The open-backed boxes have the advantage that they don't limit the termination area's volume to the size of the box. Here are a few scenarios where having more volume than what a box provides is important: In the case where the structured cable will be run directly to a device in the room (think speakers), ...


8

Note, I'm not anywhere near an alarm professional, however I have installed a couple systems before and have just recently been researching again as I prepare to move into a new house where I'd like to install an alarm. Keypads You'll want a keypad anywhere you normally enter/exit the house, such as by the garage door or back door. As @bib points out, you ...


8

TL;DR it should be OK to run them together. The signals from a security sensor are typically very low frequency because they're generated by the switch within the sensor opening and closing as the sensor activates. So for a motion detector, it might open and close a few times as you cross the field of view; a door or window sensor would switch as often ...


7

If you want to bury the cable directly in the ground then you need to use direct burial-grade cable and not "standard" cable, otherwise you need to use conduit. First you need to consider the distance to the poll. Depending on the distance and use of the cable, you might be able to use RG6, but you also might need to use RG11. You want to bury it deep ...


7

Yes, its still valid. Power and data cable coatings are insulation - designed to protect from electric shock and to avoid short circuits. They do not interfere with magnetic fields. I do not know what kind of shielding you are talking about - I have never seen any modern power or data cables with shielding that blocks magnetic fields. Magnetic fields are ...


7

OK, this is kind of a rambling question with a lot of details, but let me give you some leads on some of them: Wall Plate If you want to install a wall plate, you'll want to clean up the opening and then install a "low voltage mounting bracket", which is a square piece of plastic that frames the opening and provides a place to attach the plate: (Wall ...


7

Cable companies should not be penetrating the building with cables like the way you describe. Water can flow down this wire and into the building if it's not sealed properly. And if it is sealed properly, if the wire is able to be moved in and out because it's not securely anchored then it will eventually be able to leak should water get around it. Have ...


7

The first step is to cut the cable to length. You can use any tool capable of cutting the cable, personally I reach for my trusty lineman pliers. Once you cut the cable, it will look something like this Now that the cable is the proper length, you'll have to strip the insulation off. Again, you can use any tool capable of stripping the insulation ...


7

The cable you bought looks fine. You don't need STP (shielded twisted pair) wire. From what I've heard, it's mostly used in industrial environments with a lot of electrical interference issues. Won't really apply to residential environments. I don't think that's a drain wire since the cable is not shielded. That extra wire is not copper in the picture, ...


6

X10 (and other power line communications) signals can travel back up to the transformer, and they can interfere with other systems which are connected to that same transformer. You can purchase a "signal blocker" to prevent the signal from making it back up the line, but these will typically need to be installed in the breaker panel (which may or may not be ...


6

You normally want to use outdoor flooded cable (also called gel-filled) as it is designed to weather the elements. I have a few clients who have gone with outdoor flooded & shielded cable as they were worried about interference on the outdoor runs. Also look for UV-resistant cable if it's not going to be buried or otherwise enclosed. As for Cat 5e ...


6

To help you with the terms, what you're looking at from above is the top plate. Frequently there are two 2x4's for a top plate. Two boards are used for added structure at the joints and extra fire proofing. This gives you about 3" of wood to drill through. As ChrisF mentions, you should run a stud finder up and down the wall cavity near the halfway point ...


6

It really doesn't matter. The stacker is nice if you're in an office that will be doing new cable pulls routinely, but I think most of the time...in most houses, once the cables are in, they're rarely going to be more added--especially as more and more things are going wireless. I've just used zip ties when aesthetics weren't a major necessity.


6

If you are at construction level I would most certainly advise you use PVC conduit to run multimedia cables. In Europe I have noticed that nobody bothers too much about that in home construction because it is an extra cost. In Africa we used them everywhere because they are a time saver! Why do I suggest using them? If you clip these cables using the clips ...



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