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9

You can repair anyway you want, but for it to be repaired and the UL still good, you have to use something like 3M 2234 Cable repair kit. Here's some info on it If it is romex you are best to cut the bad part out and use a junction box (or 2) to put in the good piece. If it is in the wall then you might have to change out the whole run. With ARC Fault ...


9

Using a circular saw set to the thickness of the sub floor, cut a square between the center of the two nearest joists. The saw is held on an angle and slowly lowered to the floor, then moved to the cut lines. BE CAREFUL WHEN LOWERING THE SAW KEEP YOU LIMBS AWAY FROM THE BACK OF THE BLADE if you lower the blade to fast, it can wheel off backwards cutting a ...


8

The two options that come to mind are as follows: Rip out the wood and replace it This is the traditional way to approach the issue. This is labor intensive, but taking the time to remove all of the rotten material is usually the best way to go. Remember, you're just seeing the surface rot. There might be more damage inside. The sooner you get to that ...


8

Like Shirlock said, this does happen. I have taped a few staple mishaps along the way. Each incident is evaluated differently. If it is a neutral with just the insulation rubbed away (not a compromise to the conductor!). And I was also sure that it was used as a neutral (and not a switched lead). Then I have layed the insulation back and given it a few wraps ...


6

The answer to your question is that there is no answer - there are just so many variables that it's really impossible to answer with anything quantitative. The biggest variable is how much water is going down the drain. If you had a clog but very little water usage, it could be days before you saw anything on your basement floor. If you have a family of 8 ...


6

Unless my house was all brick and done well I would not let ivy grow on it. Ivy spreads out and finds its way in any crack. As the ivy matures it grows thicker to keep spreading. As it grows thicker it will push out on things once it is in the crack. I have ivy on a chain link fence in back yard and fence is ruined. Think about the ivy getting in ...


5

I am glad you want to learn to do this type of job yourself. Before you jump in let's answer a couple of other questions first. How old is this place? If it was build before 1978, then you must by Federal EPA Law in all non owner occupied rental apartments test the peeling paint for lead before any scraping or sanding can be done. Simple test kits can be ...


4

I think there's something in between getting the stain out and "refinishing" the table, and that's applying a food-safe oil finish to the entire table. You could wipe on (and back off) some linseed oil, tung oil, or even more salad dressing for that matter. This would be a lot less effort than any kind of refinishing and should do a lot to make the stains ...


4

you didn't describe the extent of the damage to the existing drywall, so a little hard to make a judgement call as to weather a repair would be good in your situation. As a rule, water damaged rock should be replaced or at least remove the damaged section and patch in a new piece and finish in. If the damage is fairly large or widespead, consider replacing ...


4

The risk would be that the compound wouldn't bond to the scraped-away area, or that the remaining drywall would crumble over time. It would be much better to cut out the area and patch it, and it wouldn't be that much more work. If you do decide to try it though, you might want to use some fiberglass mesh tape to reinforce the patch.


4

Ah, the wonders of carpet ... The answer is that you would be able to replace the carpet in that area, typically seamlessly, if you have more of the same carpet, such as remnants that the installers left in your attic or garage. If you don't have more of the SAME carpet -- as in, same batch, same manufacturing date, same everything -- then you will end up ...


4

Since you already have a wall paper finish on the wall and you are hesitant to move the towel bar to another location this does put a damper on the types of solutions that could be used to fix this problem. By the way; Don't feel too bad about the failure. It is very common to find towel bars attached just into the drywall. :-( The normal "robust" way to ...


3

Here is a practical answer for ya. This type of thing happens all the time and it is often impractical to replace the wire or install exposed j-boxes. Here is what you can do that will be safe. Turn off the power. Remove apx 2 to 3 inches of the outside jacket of the romex with a sharp utility knife. Remove the paper spacers and bow the black and white ...


3

This looks more like a cracked tile than a scratch (but it is difficult to say from the picture). Was there work done after the tiling that may have put stress on the wall? I must admit that it is unusal to see this on a wall tile. Replacing it is not rocket science and the preferred method (there is really no other way to fix this).


3

During our renovations we had extensive leaking through our very old plaster (c1927). We found that even after the plaster had dried, the stains would continue coming through. We had the ceiling treated with a stain blocker before painting but still some stains came through. On the ceilings with the least damage, the stain blocker + a few coats of paint ...


3

I have used Mineral Spirits before to remove oil stains. You do have to let it soak in and use something like a paper towel, kitty litter, or stay dry to soak up the oil as it comes out of the wood. Just be careful and not make it worse by spreading the stain.


3

Repairing these worn spots should be fairly easy assuming the damage is only to the urethane finish and not into the wood itself. This should be as easy as buffing the affected area with a green dish style scrubby to remove loose finish and slightly level the surrounding surface. If the scrubby is not quite aggressive enough, use some very fine 220 grit ...


3

You have a difficult problem on your hands my friend. there is no way to remove oil based stains, including olive oil, from natural wood. Pine is actually a very soft wood and easily absorbs stains of all types. A very shallow stain can sometimes be steamed up, sanded and refinished, but a larger stain from an oil may have penetrated deeply into the wood ...


3

Remove cabinet door. Fix leak. Remove particle board and put a box fan blowing into the cabinet for at least 24 hours. Treat the floor under there with a mold killing cleaning spray. Put the fan back while you cut the new bottom. I would do it piecemeal before removing the face of the cabinet. Which you may have to because removing the face of a corner ...


2

There are various oils to condition wood (lemon oil, etc), but they're just for keeping wood from drying out, etc. They are not wear protection. Nothing like a conditioning of the wood is going help your situation. There are no surface-patching compounds for wood floors that will tolerate a chair or anything like it from what I've seen. You have 3 ...


2

If the rolling of office chairs is your major concern, consider putting urethane wheels or casters on your chairs. This type of wheel will not scratch or mar the floors further. These can be found at office furniture retailers. There is no way other than using chair mats, carpet etc. that I know of to protect a wood floor if you do not want to apply ...


2

To seal water spotting or other stains on drywall, use a pigmented shellac primer such as BINS Bullseye. One or two coats will completely seal the stains, then repaint with your regular paint. When using shellac primer, be sure to have denatured alcohol available for cleaning your stuff.


2

That's a laminate countertop. You may want to try to use a repair compound like SeamFill or FormFill Laminate Repair - the damaged spot is small enough where it may work. You'll need to remove the blistered material with a sharp knife before applying the compound. Instructions for application, complete with '70s style cartoons, can be found here. If the ...


2

Go to a hardware store and get some good wood putty, filler or epoxy that can be molded and sanded. Now sand out the burnt part of the molding. Apply the putty in where you have sanded and have it roughly conform to the shape of your wood work. Then let it dry to the time as shown on the manufacturer directions. Now sand to match the rest of the molding. ...


2

No need to worry about any damage and by looking at your photos everything looks fine. (from the bottom side - how it on top?) if there was excessive amounts of water, i mean like massive pools of water, that could have caused the plaster board to bend on the weight, then it would need replacing. In you case it was a minor leak, so if the leak is fixed: ...


2

On the plus side, you ruined the least expensive type of countertop--laminate. How big is that particular section of counter top? Might be easiest to just replace that section.


2

If it's just pits and general ugliness, you can try some concrete resurfacer. Just make sure to wash and rinse the driveway well like the directions say. After it cures you can coat it with a sealer, and try not to use too much salt in the future.


2

There is some debate on the damage it can cause. Some types of ivy are self-clinging, and likely would have no structural affect on anything. Some types of ivy will try to root into cracks and crevices, though, so if there is poor brickwork to start with, that could exasperate things. But there's some arguments FOR it, as well. Here's an article from The ...


2

I spend time regularly volunteering to remove ivy, holly, blackberries, and other invasive species from Portland's Forest Park: (Note there is no ivy visible here!) English ivy is—by far—our worst problem. Armenian blackberries (formerly known as Himalayan blackberries) are another severe pest, but those proliferate only in sunny areas. Even ...



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