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12

I used a tall plastic bucket once to catch the mice in the garage - I just put a small amount of dog food in the bottom, they could not climb the walls or jump that high to get out. I used a "ramp" made of simple cardboard to the top so that they could hop right in! Safe, no poison and easy to carry out when "full".


12

"allow the dirt to breathe" doesn't even sound like an urban legend. Just sounds plain pointless. The entire point of the vapor barrier is to keep the moisture out of the crawlspace--so leave the barrier there. The dirt will be OK.


11

The fleas are most likely lying dormant (deep) in the dirt floor, below where the bombs/sprays will get to. Couple/few options: Pave it. Soak the floor 2' down with a chemical like bleach. Diatomaceous Earth. Number 1 is most permanent, #2 is dangerous as all get-out (and probably illegal), whereas #3 is cheap and safe. Diatomaceous earth is ...


11

My house has the main electrical come in below grade (built in 1967 before they knew better). I would get some small leakage coming in around the conduit where it came through the concrete and later hydro-static pressure pushing water right up into the main breaker box which, though inside, was also below grade. With a un-floored crawl space, some water ...


8

It's a drywell... water goes in and is absorbed into the soil. If you are in an area with sandy soil, this is usually ok. In heavy rain seasons, the water table rises as more and more water is absorbed into the ground. As things return to normal, the water table drops. If you're interested, Google for "water budget" or "groundwater budget" and you should ...


8

I am a big fan of the Victor Electronic Mouse Trap. They are pretty much fool-proof, and close to 100%. My wife is quite squeamish, and even she can empty them (put the whole trap in a plastic bag, open the door, and shake). They are pricy, but well worth it. We had a bit of a mouse problem last fall, and bought 2. Used a pea-size bit of peanut butter as ...


6

Most crawl spaces are vented if they have an earth floor or are prone to moisture. If you insulate between the floor joists with a moisture, mold and vermin resistant insulation (foam as we discussed before) you would still want some ventilation. The only time I would seal the exterior walls would be if I also used a pretty darn water tight moisture barrier ...


6

Any time you have heating ductwork in an unheated area, it is very wise to insulate it. There are several products, but I tend to go with the high density, foil backed fiberglass wrap most of the time. The exact type differs depending on the shape of the ductwork. (round vs rectangular) I always seal any seams in the insulation with foil tape. To solve the ...


6

Coal (especially in cities above a certain latitude) was stored under houses, often delivered down a chute to be handled as little a possible as it is messy & dusty.The cost of removing the leftover coal (an unpleasant job) far exceeded its value, so it stayed, often getting covered up later to stop the dust. Heating oil & tanks today face a ...


5

There are thousands of species of mold known to Science, with different species being found in different parts of the world. There isn't any one "crawlspace" mold or "air duct" mold, it's just whatever spores of whatever species happened to take a foothold there. Which one is more dangerous will depend on the particular species of mold and the sensitivity ...


5

You have two issues to contend with. First is that 16 feet is just a bit too tight for two floors. Sure, we usually use 12 inch beams but that's just the structure - you need an actual floor on top and usually a ceiling below. Even if we ignore building codes we will still produce two rather cramped levels. Second is what's actually holding the other end ...


4

In addition to @shirlock's answer: Gravel doesn't compact much. If you fill with soil to grade level today, in a year you'll have a shallow trench. Gravel supports the load of traffic, distributing and dispersing it, so your drain tile won't collapse. Gravel gathers water from a wider area, keeping things dryer. (Soil that doesn't percolate well will hold ...


4

Some things we found under our crawl space that you can keep an eye out for: Joist hangers weren't secured to code, not enough nails. Insulation wasn't properly secured and was sagging. If the crawlspace is part of an addition, make sure ducts and vents arn't coverd up and carry through to the exterior of the house. Make sure any vents aren't leaking air ...


4

Unfortunately I have to work in crawl spaces a lot. I don a cheap Tyvek jump suit/coveralls with a hood over my regular clothes. You can find them in the paint dept of Lowe's or HD for about $20. I also wear boots, mechanics gloves and some safety glasses. There are always some bugs, spiders, and I've met a woodchuck or two. Take a good flashlight and ...


4

I had to think about this one for a bit. The real reasons for a porous backfill are to easily track water, give depth to protect drain tile from freezing, and keep it in place so it won't float in the water. As long as those goals are met you should be fine.


4

Mold detection and identification can be done in two ways. Visible mold can be collected on a test tape, and air borne spores can be collected with an air sample kit. Either way, samples must be sent to a lab for microscopic inspection and ID. Mold and mold spores can range from common everyday varieties that rarely have negative effects on humans to very ...


4

It is a common practice to patch seams and holes in the vapor barrier with tape. The type of tape you need is often called house wrap tape. You can get it at your local home improvement store. If you use the correct tape, then you shouldn't have any issues with it.


3

Use rigid foam insulation for the walls. You may not even need insulation for the ceiling especially if you put vapor barrier on top of the ground.


3

There are some very good spray foams on the market. Most are a two part system and a starter kit runs around $800.00. This would include the hoses, tanks and spray wands and enough material to do several hundred square feet, depending on thickness. There are foams that are completely water and moisture resistant as well as mold and vermin proof. I sub out ...


3

I've found some good guides about this, so I'll share them here. I won't be accepting this answer, so if anyone else has something to add, please do. The US EPA publishes a guide on mold remediation in commercial buildings, much of which seems applicable to residential buildings also. The guide recommends three methods to clean wood surfaces smaller than ...


3

It is a good idea to seal any apertures between the crawlspace and the main house. If you have to rely on caulk and spray foam you're probably in a situation where the house has some weird structural problems - that is, you should not have giant gaps between the crawlspace and the floor above in any normal construction regimen. It is not a good idea to ...


3

OK Peter, next steps are easy compared to what you have done already. The first step is going to be install your foundation grade water proof insulation to the walls, from footer to the top. This comes typically in a sort of tongue and groove panel. Clean the excess dirt etc. off the walls and apply the mastic, then just stick the panels to the wall. ...


3

Your basic plan sounds workable. I assume your crawl space is adjacent to a full basement area? I have a couple of questions. Where does the existing drain tile system empty? Is there a difference in level between existing basement floor and footings of the crawl space? the answers to these questions may change my answer to you. But basically, adding a ...


3

Sealing up the crawlspace vents are the last thing you want to do (IMHO). If anything you want to improve the "natural" ventilation to the crawl space, doing so will (greatly) aid the evaporation of moisture and prevent mold taking hold. A sealed (stagnant air), moist space, is a pretty good environment for mold to take hold and grow (spread) in. If you ...


3

What you want to do, may not be the best idea. Typically networking equipment (and more generally electronic equipment), is best installed in a conditioned space. Ideally, you'll want a clean, climate controlled location. A crawl space generally does not fit the bill, and may be the exact opposite of the ideal location. Some of the features of the ...


3

It sounds like you already have a couple of experts working with you. Without seeing the proposed new space, I can only speak to a couple of your concerns. There is no easy way to install a sub slab vapor barrier without removing the old slab. You do not want to sandwich plastic between the old and new concrete if you are going to only put in an inch or so ...


2

Have you tried contacting NDS directly and asking for their advice/recommendation? Contact NDS I'm suggesting the above as it is my understanding that their product is only for "external" property use ie On the outside of your crawlspace/foundation wall. Below added after reading @Kenneth (feedback) comment: Dig a trench as wide as the manufactures ...


2

After you have done the wash, paint the floor with Drylok. In your case it would be best to use a economy grade paint sprayer given the roughness of the concrete. It will seal out the moisture (mold's happy place), and it will also keep out the bugs and plant roots in most cases. Yes, the ultimate solution would be to chip out the old floor and install a new ...


2

Thanks for the input. I will be draining to a 4" drain line which will cross the yard to a ditch where the dishcharge will then be carried on down the line. And I will be using a core bit to drill a hole through the block and brick foundation. I like to keep everything neat and professional looking. I am using another type of pipe which is also gravel ...



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