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13

Well this is a pretty big deal because we don't know the cause. First let's go over common reasons we get cracks on new floors. Soil wasn't properly compacted. Soil should be compacted with a rock bed on top. Bad mixing at site. Especially in the summer contractors pump too much water in the mix. The water makes the concrete weaker and it does crack ...


12

Your crack is forming over and over because the steam pipe is getting hot, expanding, and cracking your plaster. The solution is to cut the plaster back about 1/4" from the walls of the pipe all the way around, then to cover the seam with an escutcheon that hides the crack. Example of a smaller escutcheon:


7

From the pictures it looks like the cracks may only be in the stucco, and the underlying structural wall may be unaffected. It's hard to tell without actually inspecting the wall, but my guess is that these cracks are only skin deep. However, you will want to treat them to prevent them from spreading. Here is a good article about Cracks in stucco. Here ...


7

I don't see any reason why you couldn't use silicon caulking or why it would damage the surface. Just know that you will not be able to stain over it again. Some caulk is listed as paintable which might be a better bet as at least you can paint it down the road if you choose. If you are going to want to stain the door at a later date, a wood filler ...


7

You shouldn't be able to damage a concrete floor by jumping up and down on it. There will be sound transmission (as you've noticed) and there might be some movement in the floor if it's not properly tied into the walls. This would be more likely with a wooden floor supported by joists as there is more natural movement in wood than concrete. If there is ...


6

I also would like to see some pics. Small cracks in the mortar of Block walls is not uncommon, however the placement of the cracks is a very important clue as to whether or not it is a structural concern. In general, anytime I see a crack starting from the bottom corner of a window and preceding down diagonally, I am concerned. The other crack that may be ...


6

I'm not familiar with the second approach but, as you say, it would address the root issue of the tray flexing when in use and should prevent the problem recurring. It also does seem to be rather radical. The main drawback I can see is that you are causing more "damage" to the tray and therefore increasing the risk of the repair failing. I'd ask the ...


6

Lightweight spackling compound is not suitable for exterior use. Even if painted, water will effect it greatly. In addition, it is prone to cracking as it is brittle and probably will not withstand opening and closing of the door (vibrations). Wood filler or wood glue may work to fill the crack and would be better for exterior use. The glue is probably ...


6

Though the crack is diagonal it looks relatively straight. In this case I'd take a piece of wood the approximate thickness of the crack at it's widest, cut it to length and then taper it so that it fits quite snugly - you should have to use a mallet to tap it home. Don't worry about the thickness too much - but obviously it should be fairly close. Once this ...


6

I'll assume that the hole is there because concrete was put onto unrammed gravel. The current state is left on the picture Now assuming you've got rid of the animals you have to stabilize the existing concrete and the gravel beneath it. The easiest way would be to excavate some of the gravel until you reach some stable foundation (I'd guess it's around ...


5

Fill the hole with concrete. Concrete doesn't expand in the cold -- you're probably thinking of frost heave, which is where moisture in the soil freezes and expands, disturbing whatever's above it. If your sidewalk hasn't heaved by now, then the addition of new concrete below it isn't going to change anything. Filling the hole with dirt or sand may in ...


5

This is the same question you asked a couple of days ago. BTW, NEVER use silicone caulk on chimney masonry cracks, especially if the crack passes through. There are special masonry high temp caulks for this purpose. In your case where water is passing completely through the brick joints, you really need to have it repointed. Any competent contractor would ...


5

The second contractor is correct in that the root cause needs to be addressed. The root cause is either that the tub was never supported in the first place, or that the supports were made of wood and rotted out due to moisture under the tub. In addition to what Chris said, price a new fiberglass tub versus the repair. Removing the old tub might prove to be ...


5

First of all, I hope the mortar wasn't concrete. Concrete and mortar, while related, are two different things. Mortar is meant to be softer and give (rather than the brick or stone giving and thereby cracking). The proper solution is to re-tuck-point the joint. That means chip/grind out the old mortar and put new mortar back in. Alas, mortared steps are ...


5

You will need to smooth it out by applying increasingly wide applications of drywall mud; depending on how rough it is it might take 2-3 coats. You would then sand it smooth, prime and repaint the entire surface. Unless the drywall is water damaged or has significant physical damage (doesn't look like the case), you will not have to cut out anything. On ...


4

Depends on how old your house is. If it's at least 5-10 years old or so, it's probably finished settling and installing new tiles would likely fix the problem permanently.


4

You can leave a gap of a about 3-4 inches (70-100 mm). Fill the gap with gravel - you can go from coarse to fine as you go. This will ensure that there is a route for any water to drain away. If there is a lot of water you may want to go as far as installing a French Drain which has a pipe for removing the water rather than relying on percolation. Another ...


4

To remove the animals I'd hire an animal control company to get rid of them for you. You could buy some humane traps and relocate the animals yourself but a) depending on where you are that might be illegal, and b) they're skunks! Check with your municipal government to see whether they can help with the removal and if not bring in the professionals. Once ...


4

This looks like a crack caused by the wood drying and shrinking. Likely caused by dry winter air, although it's also possible that the wood wasn't properly dried before the bench was assembled. (Humidifying your whole house can help with cracks like this, but wood is a natural material and nothing will preserve it perfectly forever.) It also doesn't help ...


4

Since you already have to dig it up to fix it, don't bother trying to repair the crack. Cut out and replace the damaged section of pipe. Use a coupling suitable for the type of pipe you are working with and that is rated for burial.


4

You could patch up these cracks with an epoxy filler or a cement product type filler. In either case the filler will dry hard and be able to take the temperature extremes of your location. Repair such as this is going to leave tracks where the filled cracks were and will still be highly visible due to the surface texture that was originally applied to the ...


3

If the cracks have appeared recently and are still growing (in length and number) then this potentially indicates something serious. Before you attempt any repair - which is perfectly possible using the method you outline - get someone in to have a look so see what might be causing them. Have you put anything up in the crawlspace recently, or taken ...


3

The important thing about cracks is not necessarily their absolute number or size - though if you've got a particularly long one it can be a sign of problems, but whether the number of cracks is growing and/or the existing cracks are getting longer and/or wider. A new crack should be monitored over a few days/weeks to see if it gets longer and/or wider and ...


3

I'd just add that the important thing with cracks is to monitor them over a period to see if and by how much they are growing. Both length wise and width wise. Small cracks that don't get any bigger are less of a concern than large cracks or cracks that are growing at a "visible" rate. You could mark the current ends of the cracks and then check back in a ...


3

I don't own a house with plaster so please take this advice with a grain of salt... As you pointed out, the cracks usually appear due to settling. As a result, you ideally want your repair technique to be resilient against future movement. As far as I know, there are 2 main ways of doing this: Method #1: For smaller cracks, fill them in with painter's ...


3

Filling cracks in mortar with silicone sealant won't last very long. It might last longer than 6 months but I wouldn't expect it to last a 2nd winter. You need to get the brickwork properly repointed. It sounds like they're after charging you twice - once for the caulking and then again for the proper job, for which they will probably charge top price. ...


3

Depending on how and where it broke it going to affect what you can use. I'm going to assume you're not looking for a suggestion of duct tape. For long straight sections, where I had to cut a pipe, I've used rubber pipe connectors. You just slip it on one side of the break, align the pipes, and slip it over the break and tighten down the hose clamps. ...


3

Take a walk through with the home inspector and see what he says. If you are still interested in the house, find a good general contractor (that you trust) and take him on a walk through. The contractor should be able to give you a good estimate on what it will cost to fix any issues, he may also give you some price breaks if you are willing to let him ...


3

I worked concrete one summer while I was in high school, but I'm no expert and it was a long time ago. That being said, here's what I would try: I'd give both of your solutions a shot first. However, if you end up completely destroying the two chips, I'd try to pour a new corner. Drill two holes into the corner of the foundation and dowel into it with a few ...


3

If wallpaper was painted over you could tell pretty easily by pulling on some of the peeling paint and breaking the paint chips. Wear a respirator mask while doing this, however, as often times flaking paint is a potential indicator of lead based paint. If the chips contain paper, then you're right, it's wallpaper with paint over it. If it's just paint, ...



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