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13

I have done this with granite tiles in two different sizes, 12 by 12 inches (30x30cm) and 18 by 26 inches (45x65cm). Not a full slab, but it should basically work the same. Tools You have two tasks involved: cutting it, and smoothing/polishing the edges. For both cutting and polishing, I used an angle grinder. In my case, I bought a 4-1/2 inch grinder ...


11

I don't have direct experience but generally speaking while a circular saw blade can go through nails, it's dangerous as it increases the risk of a kick back. Although slower, you will be far safer if you cut the counter using a reciprocating saw with a demolition or dual wood/metal blade attached. That will cut through nails without the kickback ...


4

I would handle this as a tile countertop. Instead of small 4x4 tiles you will be working with the larger slate sheets. This means, 3/4 plywood down as a base. Cement board on top of that and then thin set to attach the tiles. You can then trim the outsides in whatever you want. It can be wood, tile or metal. You can also use the slate cut into smaller ...


4

There are advantages to doing it either way. If you put the paneling up first, and slid the counter top back so it overlaps the panel a bit, you'll get a very nice looking edge if properly caulked. BUT, doing it this way runs the risk of water running down the back splash, and running behind the counter, creating a rot/mould risk on the cabinetry ...


4

For an inexpensive and easy to work with material I would consider MDF. In particular there is coloured MDF available. The colour is throughout the board, not just painted on the surface, here's an example: The benefit of this is that simply scratching the surface will not remove the colour. It also gives the MDF a neat texture as the colour is not 100% ...


3

Particle board with laminate. Cut laminate so it's a little larger, glue it on with contact cement and trim the edges with a router. Cheap and durable. + =


2

I don't think it's going to be critical but when in doubt: PL. As far as I can tell, PL Premium can bond anything to anything. In a case like this, do a bead around the perimeter and bolts (quarter sized blobs) about 8" inches apart in a grid and you'd have to sacrifice a goat to a powerful deity to get those two pieces of plywood apart. The more important ...


2

I built a very similar desk using A-grade birch finish ply. It requires some careful jigsaw work for the corner part. I faced it using hardwood planks, routed and sanded. The entire desk was then urethaned, for a hard and durable finish.


2

Although cutting through nails is dangerous, I find I have kickbacks only when using a regular saw blade. When using carbide tipped blades on a 7" circular saw, or a 3.5" cordless saw, as long as I go slow I do not suffer kickbacks. You'll hear noise when going thru a nail, but the carbide is much harder than common nails and screws and it can chew through ...


2

Wood is a great material for lots of things, but if you want to put it in your kitchen you should be aware that it requires regular maintenance and has several limitations. Wood does expand and contract with temperature and humidity, but if it's properly finished (on both sides!) and fastened in such a way that it has a little breathing room, that shouldn't ...


2

In my opinion, wood is a very poor choice for kitchen counter tops. Any wood is dimensionally unstable to some extent, how much depends on several factors such as moisture content during installation and method of construction. It can be relatively stable or a complete disaster. My main objection is wood is porous. Ideally, kitchen countertops should be ...


2

I'd re-scrape, then smear a layer of white/clear caulk of the tub/tile/sink variety, working it into the 'wood' as much as possible.


2

If this is the only area that's being damaged then you could try screwing some stainless steel sheeting beneath it to act as a heat and steam shield from the dishwasher. You'll need to make sure that the very edge of the steel is not exposed so make sure it doesn't protrude out. And you may need to put some epoxy or similar right to the edge to stop the ...


2

Alignment, temperature, speed. All critical in cutting stone. A drill press or alignment jig would be better than just a handheld drill (and definitely not a hammer drill) and a constant water stream and slow speeds are necessary. At some point you are spending on tools close to what the stoneman wants. DIY is possible, but this is the kind of job I would ...


2

A granite slab of the size you describe and 1 1/4 inches thick would weigh about 300 pounds. A 3/4 inch slab, about 200 pounds. This is on top of an island that may weigh 100 to 300 pounds, depending on how it is constructed. if you add some contents, the total weight with the thicker granite will probably be between 500 and 700 pounds. If people lean on ...


2

The makers of those tops will have the seam adhesive to join the tops permanently. If they are anything like Corian by Dupont, they want to protect their warranty. You may need to do some convincing to an installer to sell you the adhesive you need. It can be done, I have done it before. It takes a router or a belt sander to get the joint down flush after ...


2

Any common butcher block countertop can be cut and rounded to fit. You'll have to refinish the sections you've cut, but there are no other special considerations. Cheap tools are often OK for one time jobs, there are also tool libraries where you can rent or borrow better tools. Some home stores offer rentals. For finishing butcher blocks, the ...


2

Scribe it. Use a compass (or a stick with a pencil attached to it) set to the widest gap - run the compass or stick-with-pencil along the wall, marking the countertop a set distance out from the wall. Cut along the line - if done carefully, the wavy edge of the countertop should now fit the wavy wall precisely.


1

If the walls aren't square, I bet the cabinets aren't square as well. And nothing says your counter top has to be square as well. The best way to hide out of square rooms is to try and match the existing angles. In this case you will need to make the miter cut a little bit off 45, probably 44. A small angle change can make a huge difference when getting ...


1

Yes, there are ways to repair this, but they aren't going to do you any aesthetic favors. In short, they'll be ugly, but functional repairs. You don't have to replace the countertop if you're OK with the modified aesthetics.


1

I presume the sink is faux marble. Try Lime Away. Or C.L.R. - they should remove it without hurting the surface. Comet bathroom cleaner (The squirt kind) works good on light rust spots, but would take a while on really severe spots.


1

The suggestions were appreciated, but we tried something different. First we smoothed it out as best as we could with razor blades and sandpaper (it still wasn't very smooth), then I put on 8 or more coats of Rustoleum protective enamel oil based paint. I'll see how it holds up. As you can see, it looks pretty ugly from underneath, but you can't see it ...


1

This may be ridged enough, however I would recommend going with a torsion box design. This is how a professional furniture maker would attempt this. You can use 2x4 for the "core" and two skins of 3/4 inch ply. I would put a perimeter of 2x4 around the core (not shown in the picture) then lag bold the perimeter into your studs. You may have to cut a ...



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