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13

I have done this with granite tiles in two different sizes, 12 by 12 inches (30x30cm) and 18 by 26 inches (45x65cm). Not a full slab, but it should basically work the same. Tools You have two tasks involved: cutting it, and smoothing/polishing the edges. For both cutting and polishing, I used an angle grinder. In my case, I bought a 4-1/2 inch grinder ...


11

I don't have direct experience but generally speaking while a circular saw blade can go through nails, it's dangerous as it increases the risk of a kick back. Although slower, you will be far safer if you cut the counter using a reciprocating saw with a demolition or dual wood/metal blade attached. That will cut through nails without the kickback ...


5

I would handle this as a tile countertop. Instead of small 4x4 tiles you will be working with the larger slate sheets. This means, 3/4 plywood down as a base. Cement board on top of that and then thin set to attach the tiles. You can then trim the outsides in whatever you want. It can be wood, tile or metal. You can also use the slate cut into smaller ...


5

Sink holes (faucet/soap/whatever) are almost always done on site. The actual sink cutout is already done at the shop and the company doing the install probably does not want to risk even further the chance of cracking/breaking. Anyone with a drill and a $15 diamond circle bit can cut these holes out in a couple mins per hole. If they can't they ...


4

There are advantages to doing it either way. If you put the paneling up first, and slid the counter top back so it overlaps the panel a bit, you'll get a very nice looking edge if properly caulked. BUT, doing it this way runs the risk of water running down the back splash, and running behind the counter, creating a rot/mould risk on the cabinetry ...


4

For an inexpensive and easy to work with material I would consider MDF. In particular there is coloured MDF available. The colour is throughout the board, not just painted on the surface, here's an example: The benefit of this is that simply scratching the surface will not remove the colour. It also gives the MDF a neat texture as the colour is not 100% ...


4

This looks to be a bad install. The gap seem too large and that is with the epoxy filling it. When a good installer deals with seams there is a process where they will clamp each side (suction cups or other methods) to push the pieces together. They will add the epoxy in before sandwiching and then scrape off and level the pieces. For different types of ...


3

Particle board with laminate. Cut laminate so it's a little larger, glue it on with contact cement and trim the edges with a router. Cheap and durable. + =


3

I have installed sinks that are supported by the plywood sub base many times. Sometimes it was framing added strategically, since there was no room for a plywood base. FWIW, countertop installers, all of them in my experience use bolts epoxied in slots under the stone top. This is for 3 cm stone, I would not want that in 2 cm stone, then I would only use ...


3

I have replaced bathroom sinks of various types with ceramic style sinks that sit from the top of the vanity cabinet surface. This work best if the before and after sinks both had the faucet holes as part of the sink body itself. Another factor to consider is selecting a new sink that will work within the hole size of the old sink. This can make the ...


2

I built a very similar desk using A-grade birch finish ply. It requires some careful jigsaw work for the corner part. I faced it using hardwood planks, routed and sanded. The entire desk was then urethaned, for a hard and durable finish.


2

Although cutting through nails is dangerous, I find I have kickbacks only when using a regular saw blade. When using carbide tipped blades on a 7" circular saw, or a 3.5" cordless saw, as long as I go slow I do not suffer kickbacks. You'll hear noise when going thru a nail, but the carbide is much harder than common nails and screws and it can chew through ...


2

Wood is a great material for lots of things, but if you want to put it in your kitchen you should be aware that it requires regular maintenance and has several limitations. Wood does expand and contract with temperature and humidity, but if it's properly finished (on both sides!) and fastened in such a way that it has a little breathing room, that shouldn't ...


2

In my opinion, wood is a very poor choice for kitchen counter tops. Any wood is dimensionally unstable to some extent, how much depends on several factors such as moisture content during installation and method of construction. It can be relatively stable or a complete disaster. My main objection is wood is porous. Ideally, kitchen countertops should be ...


2

I'd re-scrape, then smear a layer of white/clear caulk of the tub/tile/sink variety, working it into the 'wood' as much as possible.


2

If this is the only area that's being damaged then you could try screwing some stainless steel sheeting beneath it to act as a heat and steam shield from the dishwasher. You'll need to make sure that the very edge of the steel is not exposed so make sure it doesn't protrude out. And you may need to put some epoxy or similar right to the edge to stop the ...


2

A granite slab of the size you describe and 1 1/4 inches thick would weigh about 300 pounds. A 3/4 inch slab, about 200 pounds. This is on top of an island that may weigh 100 to 300 pounds, depending on how it is constructed. if you add some contents, the total weight with the thicker granite will probably be between 500 and 700 pounds. If people lean on ...


2

The makers of those tops will have the seam adhesive to join the tops permanently. If they are anything like Corian by Dupont, they want to protect their warranty. You may need to do some convincing to an installer to sell you the adhesive you need. It can be done, I have done it before. It takes a router or a belt sander to get the joint down flush after ...


2

Alignment, temperature, speed. All critical in cutting stone. A drill press or alignment jig would be better than just a handheld drill (and definitely not a hammer drill) and a constant water stream and slow speeds are necessary. At some point you are spending on tools close to what the stoneman wants. DIY is possible, but this is the kind of job I would ...


2

Any common butcher block countertop can be cut and rounded to fit. You'll have to refinish the sections you've cut, but there are no other special considerations. Cheap tools are often OK for one time jobs, there are also tool libraries where you can rent or borrow better tools. Some home stores offer rentals. For finishing butcher blocks, the ...


2

Scribe it. Use a compass (or a stick with a pencil attached to it) set to the widest gap - run the compass or stick-with-pencil along the wall, marking the countertop a set distance out from the wall. Cut along the line - if done carefully, the wavy edge of the countertop should now fit the wavy wall precisely.


1

Assuming this is a gap that was only closed when the parts were installed, silicone would be the way to go. However, it did not separate on its own. There must be something else moving, such as a (possibly wooden) base it sits on. You might want to check what has caused the crack to open, otherwise it might be a returning problem. Now for the fixing the ...


1

Given that you have a normal size sink you can get up to 48" pieces for less than $100 and sometimes as little as $40-50 for a smaller top. You aren't going to be happy paying money (you buying materials is $40) and then seeing that the granite with deformations and epoxy lines. (craigslist has many people selling leftover granite sink tops)


1

There is a method that can solve both of your problems. I’m not sure how to translate it in English but it is called something like "polishing up to a point of black gloss“. This method makes the concrete waterproof and also brings up the color like you wanted. Back in the past this is the way people made their floors waterproof. Basically you polish ...


1

The only other reason I've used them is to create a consistent reveal- notice the distance between the bottom of one drawer and the top of the next? Now compare that to the top of the top drawer and the bottom of the countertop. The eye likes to see symmetry. Do you actually need them? No.


1

Assuming you don't care if removing them will take a sledgehammer, a tube of polyurethane construction adhesive would be one "alternative method of attachment."


1

We just finished installing black slate chalk boards for counter tops. We used 3/4" plywood, then used construction adhesive. For edging we used 3/8" hickory to match the cupboards. When cutting be sure to tape the cut line and carefully support it so you avoid chipping the end of your cut. ...


1

If the walls aren't square, I bet the cabinets aren't square as well. And nothing says your counter top has to be square as well. The best way to hide out of square rooms is to try and match the existing angles. In this case you will need to make the miter cut a little bit off 45, probably 44. A small angle change can make a huge difference when getting ...


1

Yes, there are ways to repair this, but they aren't going to do you any aesthetic favors. In short, they'll be ugly, but functional repairs. You don't have to replace the countertop if you're OK with the modified aesthetics.



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