Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

From Pex Information: Flexible PEX tube is manufactured by extrusion, and shipped and stored on spools, where rigid plastic or metal piping must be cut to some practical length for shipping and storage. This leads to several advantages, including lower shipping and handling costs due to decreased weight and improved storage options. PEX plumbing ...


8

Copper has a well-proven track record Copper parts are more readily-available and it's easier to repair (eg, don't need the expensive crimping tool like with PEX) Safer during fires since it is much more resistant to heat and giving off fumes That said, I am a huge fan of PEX. It's been around for quite a few years now (though obviously nowhere near as ...


6

I would minimize the amount you bend them. Think of it like a metal coat hanger, if you bend it in the same place several times, it will break. Only the copper pipe is hollow, so it will break a lot sooner. As best you can, avoid bending it multiple times in the same place.


6

There is absolutely no difference between the materials used for hot and cold water pipes (at least there isn't in the UK!). The same copper is used for both and if you have a piece of pipe that was previously used for hot water you can use for cold water and vice versa. As long as the pipes are connected up properly then there'll be no problems.


6

Very Important Make sure the joint is really clean when you solder - so use emery cloth or sandpaper to remove any contaminants in your solder joint and flux the joint prior to heating. I like to wipe the joint with acetone before applying flux but I'm anal retentive like that. Also you might want to consider using MAPP gas vs propane - those brass ...


5

Another advantage to PEX if you're doing a from-scratch installation is that it's typically installed using a manifold at the water source with a run to each faucet. That approach significantly reduces pressure loss at one faucet when another faucet on the same branch is turned on, as often happens with copper plumbing. You could do the same thing with ...


4

Yes you can do that (it's the standard way of converting to/from copper), and it shouldn't cause any troubles (read http://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/1331/why-would-you-use-copper-over-cpvc-or-pex and http://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/261/does-pex-tubing-have-any-advantages-over-copper for some comparisons). Of note: you can get the male adapters ...


4

Fewer points of failure Bending results in fewer high risk failure points. A continuously bent pipe has 2 high risk failure points. Whereas a similar length of pipe made with a bunch of fittings, has 2 high risk failure points per fitting. Quieter Bending a radius will provide less resistance within the pipe, so water will flow smoother. In a ...


4

There are flexible hoses made for connecting to water heaters but they are usually only a few feet long and are only meant to make it easier to swap the heater for maintenance. They are also much larger, usually 3/4" size, because they are feeding the entire house. The hoses you show in the picture are 3/8" and are only meant to serve a single small fixture. ...


4

The safest way to bend a copper pipe is to use a pipe bending spring. They come in sizes to fit the diameter your pipe so you'll need two - one for each type of pipe. The spring stops the pipe kinking by supplying support to the inner part of the bend. Simply slide the spring up the pipe, bend it and then work the spring out.


4

I'm guessing it's plumbing, not conduit. Unless you actually see wires running through the tubing, I'm not convinced it's conduit. In the US only certain types of conduit are listed for use, and I'm sure they are similar in Canada. Copper is not among those listed, so it's not likely it would be approved by an inspector. In a comment you mentioned that the ...


3

To resist hammering and to get the pipes to align, you should really have them clamped down with tube straps close to the top of the wall and close to the fitting. This should hold things in place well enough for you to get the fitting in, and will help support the fitting. Example of strapping: If you need to, screw/nail an extra chunk of 2x4 to the ...


3

You can use the Sharkbite or Gatorbite connectors as a junction for copper and PVC. Sharkbite and Gatorbite connectors are "snap together" connectors available at Lowes or HomeDepot, you can put copper in one side and PVC in another.


3

If you want to make this task really easy, you can use a sharkbite. Its a connector than can join different tubing without the need for soldering. While expensive for a connector, ~$5, it will save you the hassle of sweating pipes, especially if they are in a hard to reach area. You can find them at HomeDepot, not sure what other stores carry them.


3

A huge disadvantage with PEX is that it is semi-transparent. If your water supply has nutrients in it and the PEX is installed so that light will get to it, you will find that algae (green), bacteria (black, orange or yellow) will grow inside it. It sloughs off in long, stringy goop similar to the biofilm that grows in diesel tanks that haven't been treated ...


3

There is one huge advantage I see just from reading these posts. No More Copper Thieves! I live in New Orleans and had to have my whole system redone because it was cut and stolen.


2

I know PEX is cheaper (specially considering the rising price of copper), easier to run and less noisy than copper but you have to buy a special crimping tool for the fittings (don't know how expensive the tool is). My only fear would be long term effects depending on water type. For instance I have very hard water (very high calcium content ... I should ...


2

You branch off from the copper tubing with a 1/4" compression tee. Cut out a small section of tubing for which the tee replaces. You must use a tubing cutter to do this, any other method will cause the tube to become oval. Install the short piece removed on the side outlet of the tee. Attach a 1/4" compression x 1/2" pipe thread adapter to the short ...


2

Are there some specific reasons why people recommend bending long copper pipes, instead of cutting them into sections and joining them using U-joints, elbow-joints etc. ? Pipe fittings add resistance to the flow of the fluid in the pipe. This is usually expressed in terms of an equivalent pipe length for the different fittings (eg, elbows, tees, etc). ...


2

Bending copper has to be done with annealed copper. Rigid copper is too brittle can be done with either drawn or annealed copper. This table from copper.org does suggest slightly larger minimum radii for drawn pipe. thanks to @UNECS for prompting further research. You can make rigid copper easier to bend successfully by heating the area of the bend with a ...


2

I can think of two possible explanations: It could be brass conduit. These were once used to wire submerged swimming pool light fixtures. Maybe an electrician had some left over and used it where it wasn't necessarily required. It could actually be copper plumbing in a water-related use, such as to provide hot weather cooling for the roof above, or ...


2

You may notice a rotten egg odor from the water from time to time if the sulfur content is high enough. Bacteria in the water convert sulfur compounds into hydrogen sulfide which reacts with the copper to form a coating of copper sulfide. There are no set limits on how much sulfur can be in the water. It's naturally occurring and not considered to be a ...


2

Clean it off with some wire wool. As far as I can tell, it looks like marking where flux has run and is unlikely to be any serious corrosion that warrants pipe replacement, but the best way to tell will be to clean it off and see the state of the pipe for yourself close up.


1

Like everyone has said, you're making a big transition. But not one that can't be made. Personally, I'd firmly attach the timer itself to the back of your fridge, then pipe/adapter/transition your way from the timer to the aforementioned 1/4" compression tee. That way the timer always holds still and any garden hose / timer manipulation movements are not ...


1

This is a pretty dramatic transition in sizes and connections. You are going from 1/4 inch copper (compression fittings) to 1/4 inch tee to 1/4 to 1/2 adapter to 3/4 inch bibb faucet (or adapter, if you can find) to 3/4 inch hose to 3/4 inch timer to 3/4 inch hose to 3/4 to 1/2 tubing adapter to the irrigation tubing. As the comments point out, very ...


1

There's no reason you can't, you'll just need several couplers along the way, and this will likely end up a very "previous owner"-type solution if you leave it in place. The 1/4" lines do not move much water, so plan accordingly.


1

If you have the opportunity to replace your galvanized pipes, do so. It's an inconvenient project, involving opening up a lot of walls, but as you can tell from the comments, galvanized pipe is problematic at best over the long term. It will frequently develop (as is the case in my own home and in my rentals) pin hole leaks. The only good news with ...


1

You can buy replacement parts for those baseboard heaters, although anything designed for heating isn't going to be certified food safe. Copper in general is usually clad with stainless when used for cooking, plus the solder used with copper isn't going to be food safe.


1

You might try a scrapyard. There are probably old radiators kicking around from people who scavenge worksites. Maybe not, though--they may have been sold off when the price of copper jumped.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible