Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

The logic involved is much more complex. Right now the logic is simple: if AC Mode and it's too hot, turn on AC, else turn off AC if Furnace mode and its too cold turn on furnace, else turn off furnace But the determination of when to switch between heating and cooling modes is much more complex - otherwise the ac would kick on, and it would get too ...


11

I assume you mean the roof is exposed to the sun...and that in turn is heating your ceiling? If so, options: make sure the roof is reflective (white/metallic) rather than a dark color (which absorbs heat) make sure the roof is insulated If the roof can support a green/planted roof, consider that. plant trees to shade the roof (obviously may take a few ...


9

A thermostat basically just energizes the individual circuits (G (fan), W (heat), Y(cool) ) which in turn (via the furnace controller) powers a relay which provides line voltage to the actual units (like the fan or A/C. In the case of heat, it instructs your furnace to open the valve supplying gas). R (or Rh and Rc) provides the 24VAC power. To turn on ...


6

If your current AC is not adequate to extend to the garage area, then a ductless mini-split wall mounted AC unit is probably ideal for your situation. Once installed, you'll likely exceed the $1500 budget, but I think it's the best of the options. You wall mount half of the unit inside the home and run the cooling lines through the wall and out to an ...


6

If you open both the top and bottom about 3" the hot air goes out the top and cooler air comes in the bottom.


6

What about an attic vent fan such as this one? It has a thermostatic control. Separate shutters are also available such as these. They open based on the air pressure generated by the fan. You would need to create "in" vents, preferably placed low on several walls to allow full air flow. These could be either fixed or shuttered, depending on whether ...


5

Generally one opens the bottom window, simply because it's easier. The features of the window tend to be designed with that in mind: the screen (if it is original to the window) will usually have a bit of extra fill along the top edge where it meets up with the upper window's bottom edge if there is a partial open lock (that prevents complete opening) ...


5

Much like DA01 said, a ceiling fan generally acts to circulate air within a particular space of the home. This evens out the temperature of the air in the room by preventing "stratification" (where the air settles into noticeable "layers" so it's warmer at head height than at the floor), and also provides an illusion that the air is cooler by constantly ...


5

There are programmable thermostats that automatically switch from heat to a/c and to heat again. Some Honeywell thermostats, such as the 8000 Series, have 'auto' setting where you can program the Heat temperature and the cool temperature and the thermostat will automatically switch from heat to cool. I don't know how long they've been on the market though.


5

You haven't mentioned what sort of fixture these bulbs are in, but this sounds like a classic case for compact fluorescent lights (CFL). Efficiency in light bulbs boils down to "for a given amount of power running through the bulb, how much is turned into light and how much is wasted as heat?" Fluorescent bulbs are much more efficient than incandescents; ...


5

A 60-watt incandescent puts out about 800 lumens of light. A 100-watt incandescent puts out about 1600 lumens. Your 10 60 watters put out about 8000 lumens total. It'll only take 5 100-watt bulbs to equal that. 60 * 10 = 600 watts heat. 100 * 5 = 500 watts heat. So, if the sockets can handle it, your room will be a little cooler if you switch to using 5 ...


4

For central A/C, you'll need ducts and vents. Once you have the ducting in place anyway, you might as well use it for both your heating and cooling. For a three floor house, you definitely want some kind of zoned system, with a thermostat on each floor. (I wish my 2-floor house was zoned.) You may want multiple cooling systems, or maybe one system with ...


4

Whenever it's cooler outside than it is inside. But you have to factor into the equation the humidity, breeze, impact of sunlight since you can't keep the blinds down, etc. And if you open the windows, the humidity that enters the home takes time to be removed by the AC. Personally, I wait until the outside high temp is about 5F above my target temp, and ...


4

You also want to ventilate the attic space. If there is a space between the ceiling and the roof, its going to get pretty hot in there. In our house it can get above 190 °F. You can get gable mounted fans that suck in air from outside (at 100 °F, or what ever temperature it is outside) and force the 190 °F air out of the attic. Another thing ...


3

Window unit air conditioners rely less on the ledge and more on the window itself to keep from falling. The unit is surrounded by a frame. You carefully set the unit in the window with the frame tilted forward some towards you. You then lower the window until the A/C frame can rest on the frame of the window itself. Portable air conditioners usually (as ...


3

Mineral build-up is going to be dependent on your water. Do you have a Water Quality Report? Mine looks like this: http://www.acwd.org/story_detail.php5?story_id=157 Hard water starts around 10 grains per gallon or 170 ppm. In other words, 1 liter of water will have 0.17 grams of calcium/magnesium. I didn't see any water usage estimates for coolnsave aside ...


3

A ceiling fan does two things: provide breeze circulate air It's primary used for the latter. In your case, it may help by evening the temperature out, though to what extent is hard to say given the size of the fan and the size of the space. Ideally, you'd handle the upstairs/downstairs with a split zone HVAC system. You'd then add programmable ...


3

When renting a victorian back in the day we did the same thing, we draped a sheet over the stair case to trap the cold air above. So...I think your curtain idea is perfect. Shouldn't be that hard to install, isn't permanent, but should be plenty to block the cold air from escaping. A more permanent enhancement to that system would be to place a ceiling fan ...


3

Most ceiling fans have a reverse switch. In the summer, you want cool air blowing down in the center to give you the breeze. In the winter, you want the warm air from the ceiling to mix with the rest of the room, but without the breeze, so you reverse it and the warm air descends around the sides of the room where you're less likely to feel the draft. If ...


2

The best is to block the sun from the outside. Options there would be: plant a tree (pro: green; con: might take a few decades to get full effect) awnings (pro: do great at blocking summer sun; con: costs a bit, takes some maintenance, can block views) As for the windows themselves, are they high-efficiency? Ideally you'd have triple-pane glass with ...


2

Check out www.nest.com for the Learning programmable thermostat. It isn't stated right up front but it has an auto switching mode and does so very intelligently. It also uses local weather forecasts (via wifi) and time to temp (the time it takes for your system to heat and cool the home) to help determine what mode it should be in and when.


2

Some do automatically switch. I remember getting a new thermostat for free with my new A/C unit. The manual said that the model XXX-A auto switched. In small text it said something like "This feature is only needed in cities like Phoenix where it can be very hot during the day and very cool at night." I literally said D'Oh! I live in Phoenix, and they would ...


2

You can install an insulating cover on the inside of the unit. Some vendors caution against using outside covers unless the unit has been cleaned and drained first.


2

What had happened was someone cleaned the blades of the fan. When they did that, it seems that the blades were slightly bent out of shape. Not enough for it to be immediately visible. But once I played around with the individual blades and restarted, the wind flow changed dramatically. So if you have this problem, make sure to check to see if the blades ...


2

Plan 1 I live in a desert, sometimes the hottest place in the USA, beating Death Valley. Lots of people here use evaporative coolers, or what we call swamp coolers. If you live in a humid area, then forget it because swamp coolers cool by putting a cool dampness in the air, nothing wet but on a hot dry day a properly sized cooler can cool a 2000 square ...


2

Your efficiency probably isn't harmed too much by this—you still have basically the same area of radiator fins. If you had a fan blowing through the fins (e.g. on a computer heatsink) I might be a little more concerned because active airflow is an important part of the cooling. But how much active air circulation is really going on behind your fridge? ...


2

P = I * A Typically 10 or 20 AMP circuits draw : 10 * 120 = 1200 W 20 * 120 = 2400 W Watts of power. So, 600W is a lot on one circuit, (25% to 50%) of total output. That in of itself will produce a significant amount of heat. As @MT_Head says, you need to decrease your draw, and that is only going to be accomplished by switching out the bulbs to a ...


2

Adding insulation to your ceiling is probably the ultimate answer, but it may be expensive and disruptive. The master bedroom in our last house was below a flat roof, and I found the following measures made for more comfortable sleeping: 1) Since the cold air from air conditioners tends to sink, use fans to blow it back up to the ceiling. From there it ...


2

You would be far better off building a roof type structure over the window well that is well above the window well and projects far enough out around the edges of the well that rain water does not enter the well. Trying to jury rig a scheme to keep an existing lid open "just enough" sounds like a recipe waiting for disaster. Either it will be left closed ...


1

A thermographic camera would be an expensive way to measure heat loss. An inexpensive laser thermometer would give you readible difference between several points. Both methods require a temperature difference between sides of the wall. The most accurate measurents would require the greatest difference. It would be easier to see the difference between a 70 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible