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I had 8 of the ($90) knee braces made for about $70 total by purchasing the 1/4 inch steel plate from a metal recycler. For that price they cut the pieces, drilled the holes and welded them up.


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This is the typical structure of a hip-roof: As you can see, the ridge board, or ridge beam, is holding up the "jack rafters" at the top of the incline. Arguably the 4 diagonal boards - the hip rafters - are holding up the ridge board on their own, but simply for load bearing purposes, place supports under the ends of the ridge board (and possibly one in ...


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Studs are vertical. They are present to transfer the weight from the top plates (which are the top pieces that frame the wall) to the bottom plates, all of which then gets transferred to the next level down. Beams and top plates are similar in function but beams carry more load over a wider span, and usually rest on either solid walls (foundation walls) or ...


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From what I understand when sand prices went high certain unscrupulous elements dug out mud and repeatedly washed it, to produce what is called as filter sand, near Herbal Bangalore a school girl was killed when a wall collapsed which was made of filter sand. Ever since the govt has banned use of this sand. Finally you can do a test yourself take some sand ...


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I just purchased a house in the United States, Pennsylvania to be specific by a lake and I was considering pouring concrete over the floor which is identical to the floor pictured above. However I was told that this type of floor was designed this way for drainage should water enter the space...makes sense to me now. The wood floors that have since been ...


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The common practice for future expansion is to install the box and put a blank cover on it. That eliminates the requirement of chopping into the drywall to find the wire. It also eliminates the need to create as-built documents and store them for future reference so you can find the wires later. My recommendation is to install device boxes with ENT ...


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This is really a regional legal question more than anything. You'll have to ask your local building code enforcement office. Typically, though, no, no one needs an architect...just someone that can approve the engineering (be it 3rd party, or the jurisdiction, itself). Now, there are arguments for and against hiring an architect in general (outside of ...


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Would you let a recent engineering grad design a bridge? An architect should bring a depth of experience in housing that you may or may not have. This should include ease (/cost containment) of building, usability, and hopefully, beauty. To your question, it might vary by jurisdiction (phone your AHJ), but I'm pretty sure you could draw your own plans.



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