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12

There is a lot to know. Shortest answer: you should let experts handle anything you're not sure of. You need to comply with local building codes (This also means you need to know what those are. Inspectors don't accept ignorance as an excuse.) The design needs to be approved by an architect or structural engineer. There are strict requirements on ...


12

If you have a pulley and no way to anchor it overhead, you could always lift from the top, with the pulley attached to the bucket. Of course, you'll need to have an anchor for the rope somewhere on the floor you're at, but it only has to be at the height you want to lift the bucket to. The resulting load will be half of the bucket that you're lifting. If ...


11

Step #1: Finding the center. Never built a round deck before, but to find out where you want to put the deck, and to mark the center point, I would drive a stake or nail, tie a string to it that is as long as the desired diameter (30' here), and then walk in a circle with it, keeping it taut, and putting some long nails into the ground, at the end of the ...


11

I don't think there is specific universal height as people aren't manufactured in a specific universal height. Googling for "workbench height" returns many results asking the same thing: what is the best height for a workbench. This page suggests the following method: A good rule of thumb is to make the workbench table the same height as the distance ...


11

I assume you mean the roof is exposed to the sun...and that in turn is heating your ceiling? If so, options: make sure the roof is reflective (white/metallic) rather than a dark color (which absorbs heat) make sure the roof is insulated If the roof can support a green/planted roof, consider that. plant trees to shade the roof (obviously may take a few ...


10

There is a large body of information about what size furniture and tools should be. The field concerning sizing furniture to individuals and populations is called Anthropometrics and information about safety and ease of use is called Ergonomics. If you are building your own workbench for your own use, then you should size it to yourself unless you expect ...


10

This is to protect vehicles from damaging gas appliances that lie beyond. This is a code requirement in many jurisdictions, probably including yours, as most builders don't do anything they don't have to.


9

There's no real answer to this - it depends on how tall you are, what you are using the bench for and if you are standing or sitting (and then, are you using a chair or stool?). The use for it might also play a role. Things like electrical soldering work require you to be a lot closer to the project then wood working. The simple solution to this is to ...


8

You need to have a graspable (grippable) handrail... in other words something that you can get your hand around and hold onto if you fall off the steps. The 2x6 is too big for your hand to grab around and does not qualify. Standard handrail brackets usually look something like this: Also see this article (Deck Stair Handrails) for a picture of a ...


7

I used to have a pre-made triangle that was made from three lengths of string and three washers, we put a blue one at the 90. It was built using an isosceles triangle instead of a 3/4/5... for this reason I'll warn you that it's easier to build it using metric measurements. You'll also want to make sure the line you're using does NOT have a lot of stretch in ...


7

Your house is more than likely Balloon Framed. Stick and Platform framing hadn't come into being in 1900. In a balloon-framed house, the studs you see in the basement run all the way up to the roof. The filler material is a concrete mixture that was used as a partial fireblock and also to hold the spacing of the studs. You can put a hole through the ...


7

If you had an professional engineer design the whole unit as an assembly it may be possible to have the railings and metal concrete reinforcing members in the steps and risers work as a trussed span structure that was only supported at the bottom step and at the top step. This is definitely not a project for any local neighborhood handyman, general masonry ...


6

You'd need to get an engineer to look at it first. The biggest problems I can think of are structural -- even if the house is pier and beam, you'd need to move piers out. If it's not, you would need to dig out a new foundation. Then you have to figure out if the overhang is actually appropriate as a roof over indoor space, that moving the wall won't ...


6

As a former construction estimator, I would suggest that you get in touch with the contractor sales department at a building supplies store in the area in which you're considering building. Quite often the estimators there will have a ballpark "per-square-foot" price for materials, and may have an idea of a ballpark price for labour, too. They can probably ...


6

They are still working in compression - the only difference is the extra weight of the base, which hopefully is negligible compared to the load you are lifting. Edit: Assuming you have a dual acting system - where hydraulic fluid pushes against either side of the piston (rather than just an air jack where atmospheric pressure pushes it back) then there is ...


6

If in doubt, don't. It might be worth paying a structural engineer to take a look and let you know if it's safe to remove a wall. Depending on the layout and age of the house, it may not be possible to know without doing some destruction down to the studs to see for sure.


6

It occurred to me that this project might benefit from a single piece stone cap and eliminate lintel altogether. You could incorporate a bit of slope and weather proof the structure. A stone supply house could fashion it out of limestone. More traditional lintel: This window drawing is pretty analogous to a mailbox opening: You are probably building a ...


6

Building parts, building tools, building techniques, and building skills are all based on square walls. With building parts, you have things like bricks with 4 sides, wood sheathing with straight edges, not to mention studs, drywall, and most other building materials with factory edges. With tools, framing squares, levels, speed squares, and corner tools for ...


5

There isn't enough information in that sketch to verify calculations (for instance, we have no idea what's on the floor above), but here are some reactions: Removing 60cm of support may be significant, depending on how much load that wall was carrying. If the arch is structural, removing it requires additional support. Your existing building may not be ...


5

Lift the dry materials, run a hose for the water, mix in place, avoid having to lift the weight of the water. The REALLY EASY but rather expensive method - hire a concrete pump truck for the day.


5

I had a project some years back building a 28 foot high chimney. Needless to say there was a need to hoist a lot of buckets of mortar and then all the chimney blocks and flue liners up to the work site. I ended up renting some scaffold bracket assemblies that came with a overhanging cross bar with a large pulley hanging on the end of it. You could try this ...


4

My first thought would be to build the deck in individual 4x8 sections. So you build a frame out of 2x4's or 2x6's with one sheet of plywood on top and the insulation pre-installed between the framing members. You would then set up your concrete piers and beams that would support the sections. If you use 2x4 framing for the pre-built sections, you would ...


4

If you are dealing with hydraulics there is always a chance of leakage with time or catastrophic failure. For this reason I would suggest the following: You should have a back up for holding the load in place if the hydraulics fail. This is quite often a simple pin that locks the piston in place in specialised systems but provided it is done adequately ...


4

Here would be my basic approach (Mechanical Engineer here, Statics TA for 4 semesters): For starters, you could figure out the weight of the mattress and box spring plus the weight of two people lying on it (W). Add in a safety factor (at a minimum 2, ideally a bit more) - remember, an uneven or dynamic loading will apply significantly higher stresses to ...


4

You also want to ventilate the attic space. If there is a space between the ceiling and the roof, its going to get pretty hot in there. In our house it can get above 190 °F. You can get gable mounted fans that suck in air from outside (at 100 °F, or what ever temperature it is outside) and force the 190 °F air out of the attic. Another thing ...


4

Couple possibilities I can think of (hard to tell without looking at a floor plan): Floor was built over a larger area and then covered over. Landing or base of the stairs was moved, possibly during early construction. Floor or landing was intentionally extended to provide a shelf for storage. Joists are continuing to a load bearing structure (wall of the ...


4

The concrete itself should be fine. Make sure water doesn't have anywhere it can pool, since standing water, concrete, and freezing temperatures can lead to cracking. I would protect any metal brackets or bolts intended to secure the framing to the foundation. And I would also protect any plumbing coming through the foundation. Where the water line is ...


4

I agree with others... the amount of custom work required is going to obliterate your budget. Custom-cut flooring, custom-cut drywall, custom wood framing, custom kitchen. Everything will be a hand-done one-off. I wouldn't be surprised if the final cost were double what you'd pay for a square house of comparable footage, and take a lot longer to build. If ...


4

I live in an area with at least 3 or 4 N-gon (not necessarily octagon) houses. I've been inside one and, as a house geek, asked the owners plenty of questions. Here's what I picked up: They love the house It is FAR larger than it looks from the outside. Like most houses in the neighborhood, this is in the 2000-2800 ft² range. Cabinetry wasn't a problem. ...


4

Once you have corrected your axis of rotation it should be obvious that the idea to lengthen the "clip" will not change anything with regard to the force required to raise the flap. Actually it could make things worse if the longer clip added more weight to the whole assembly. The force needed to raise the flap is measured in some units like foot-pounds ...



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