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35

Empty conduit is your best bet here. No point in guessing what (if anything) you may get, and guessing wrong. While you can leave a pull string in it, you can also just vacuum a pull string into it when the time comes (that's what is normally done to install it in the first place). If you do leave a string, don't worry about how big/strong it is: it can be ...


15

Your biggest concern here is going to be the condition of the interior. If they are at all corroded or otherwise rough on the inside they run the risk of damaging the insulation, which can lead to an eventual short and/or electrification of the pipes. Protecting the wire where it enters and exits the pipe is also a concern. Basically I think you could do ...


13

The best future proofing you can do is over-provisioning the amount and size of conduit. Pulling a cable through a relatively straight 200m run is not out of the question especially with proper cable lubricant and a large enough conduit. I would suggest not pulling anything like fiber without proper specs on the gear on both ends. There's a good chance ...


9

Now you've learned the hard way, the same way the rest of us learned, why they say "measure twice." A spade bit may work for this trick, but an auger bit may be easier to control. First, use the bit to cut a hole in center of some scrap wood. A piece of plywood that's 4"x6" would work well, and a 2x4 that's 6-8" long would also work. You need a few inches ...


9

Running conduit now is definitely cheaper than fishing behind drywall later. It requires a lot of holes in drywall to fish wires, and then each hole needs to be patched, painted, etc. It's also a difficult and potentially time-consuming job, as existing wiring, plumbing, etc gets in the way. It also depends on how much conduit you're installing of course - ...


9

How about an EMT slip on bushing? This about explains it all. Catalog Page EDIT: I think there are three goals here - clamp the NM cable in place, protect the cable from the sharp edge of the EMT, and secure the EMT to the jbox on one end. I showed you how to protect the romex coming out of the EMT. To secure the NM cable in place, where you want to ...


8

No, you cannot. Unless you're not covered by National Electrical Code (or similar), you don't care about following codes, or you're also installing a permanent barrier or listed divider. National Electrical Code Chapter 8 Communications Systems. Article 820 Community Antenna Television and Radio Distribution Systems. 820.133 Installation ...


7

Exposed ground wires are normal. In the last year I've seen a main panel and 2 subpanels approved with exposed ground wires. They were 6ga stranded.


7

For the duct work, since we don't know how many cables you are talking about, I suggest ENT (Electrical Non-Metallic Tubing). It is flexible, corrugated and comes in a range of sizes, same as PVC. You can even use PVC connectors on ENT if in a bind. For termination, you can either use a box / terminating structured media center or make your own with a ...


7

There is a widespread belief that the NEC does not allow NM-cable in conduit, but does allow THHN (the individual wires). This belief is incorrect. However, it is for some reason lesser-known that NM-cable cannot be used in outdoor conduit at all, stripped or otherwise. So, the answer to your question is: stripping is a common but misguided (unnecessary) ...


6

I guess a big question is: do you need to conform to code? If you have a building permit out, the inspector may want to see your wiring before you cover it. Your pipe may violate code, and the inspector won't approve the work. Are you going to sell this house someday, with the wires running into the pipes visible? If so, the buyer's building inspector will ...


6

There are collar boxes available that have conduit KO's (knockouts). Just install one on top of the existing device box and run your conduit. This one is even better as it has more volume: Brand: Steel City, Part number:531511234UB Here is a raised device cover to be used with the 4x4 box shown. They can be had in any number of different ...


6

Your two choices if you want normal AC power out there are: Direct burial cable. Figure something like $0.50/foot for 12 gauge cable, though it's possible that you will need to buy a roll of 500' instead of just 300' since 250' or 500' are standard lengths. If you do this, you will need to make sure that it is buried 24", and I highly recommend putting a ...


6

Could you put a couple intermediate "manholes" in the path? So instead of one 200m pull you have 3 or 4 shorter runs? You'd still run a 200m cable, but this way you only have to pull it 50-65m at a time. I'd definitely run at least one, maybe 2 empty conduits - it's a lot easier to run an extra conduit now than to re-trench it later


6

NO! Regular couplings, those in the first image, are NOT pull points. Pull points are conduit bodies or boxes, or even those silly little elbows in the second image. My suggestion would be to install a conduit body at strategic locations. For your installation you really only need one. Conduit bodies:


5

I see 3 problems: The gap, as you noticed. One of the conductors' insulation is damaged (I think - it's not obvious from the picture) That's EMT, which is not a good choice for burial. The couplings are not strong enough (as you can see) and they're not waterproof. The tubing can rust away below ground. It is technically allowed, though, per NEC 358.10. ...


5

The IRC or the NEC doesn't apply here, common sense does. What you need to do is apply a paintable silicone acrylic or silicone caulk to the back of the box and around the entry hole before you screw the box to the wall. There should be holes inside the box or external ears for mounting. The idea is to stop water from going behind the box and around the ...


5

You should have no problem using Schedule 80 PVC conduit. It's easy to work with, and you can get pre-formed 90's for any corners (so you won't need a pipe bender). You might be able to get away with Schedule 40, but since it will be exposed (and in a work area where it could get smashed with a wayward piece of lumber) I would go with Schedule 80. Just ...


5

What you're calling outdoor Romex is actually called type UF (underground feeder) cable, it resembles Romex, but it's not. UF cable is THHN conductors plus a ground encased completely in PVC. Romex is a brand name for non-metallic paper bonded cable (NM-B, as printed on the jacket) with a PVC jacket. This is why type UF is suitable for burying and wet ...


5

I'm guessing it's plumbing, not conduit. Unless you actually see wires running through the tubing, I'm not convinced it's conduit. In the US only certain types of conduit are listed for use, and I'm sure they are similar in Canada. Copper is not among those listed, so it's not likely it would be approved by an inspector. In a comment you mentioned that the ...


5

Depends. If the conductors are 6 AWG or smaller. There is enough free space. It's not a short radius conduit body. The volume is durably and legibly marked by the manufacturer. Only then can the conduit body contain splices. In your specific case, I don't see the volume listed in the specifications section on the Home Depot page. So you'd have to check ...


5

Try using an 11b extension ring or a 1900 extension ring. Actually made to deepen a junction box, but should work for this application.


4

(I am not an electrician) The purpose of the ground wire is to provide a clear path of least resistance for electricity to follow in the event of a short, so that instead of going through your body, it goes to the ground. Strictly speaking, exposed ground within a wall isn't wrong - for instance if you use armored cable, often the armor not only acts as ...


4

Yes, it is a safety issue, wiring should always be covered by something, anywhere. The connection should be water tight, the connector used is not. Electric proof is not an issue, that is the job of the insulation of the wires. Cold resistant is not an issue for the wiring, but could be an issue if the cold made some protective material brittle. Protection ...


4

HDMI and speaker wire are basically signal wires, not power wires. Both the voltage and amperage is very low. Indoors it is safe to run these hidden or exposed without channel or conduit if they are properly rated. See this Q&A for a discussion of proper rating. When channel or conduit is used, it is either for convenience in handling, and to keep the ...


4

Your local hardware store should have a selection of conduit that's suitable. Generally any PVC should be OK as it's designed to survive the weather, and does so very well. I used 15mm, but I wasn't running coax - just data cables. An SC fiber connector would not fit through a 15mm conduit, so you'll either have to get a larger conduit than this or get it ...


4

I am not an electrician, but as I'm currently in the middle of some renovations myself, I was curious and did some searching. I came across "Mike Holt’s Illustrated Guide to 101 Essential NEC Rules" (that's chapter 3 in PDF form), which, in article 362, it explains that it can NOT be used for wiring systems over 600V. To me, that appears to be saying that ...


4

Since @Tim's post didn't make this clear: under the current code, you are not allowed to run NM-B wire outside, even through a conduit. I don't have the NEC to verify this; I read it in this book (pg 155, "Wiring Outside"): Under the 2008 code, you must use UF cable anytime NM-style cable (even in conduit) exits the side of the house. That is, you are ...


4

This depends on whether you are using pre-assembled cables or not. The following images were made using The Engineering Toolbox's Smaller Circle in Larger Circle Tool to find the optimal packing. If using bare cable (No Connectors) Using a 6.5mm (0.256) Diameter cable, you can fit only 5 cables per conduit. However, this assumes the cables are perfectly ...


3

I don't know why it might be disallowed by local codes. As mentioned in the comments to the question, this stuff is often put into poured walls and floors. It is used quite heavily for 240V wiring and phone/data wiring in Israel where almost all construction is concrete. We also used it for both 120V/240V and data in WaterShed here in the USA. As another ...



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