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9

You're dealing with a basic fact of nature, water condenses on cold objects, so you need to either remove the water or the cold objects. The windows will typically be the coldest objects in your home since they have such a low R value. Start by reducing the humidity in your home, run exhaust fans in the kitchen and bathroom for longer when cooking and ...


5

Did the problem just start? Is the condensation on the pipe frozen? If so, this is an indication that the compressor is overworked (possibly low on coolant). If you are seeing any frost, you should turn off the system before the compressor burns out and call an HVAC professional. Insulation is wrapped around the coolant line to prevent condensation from ...


5

I wouldn't bother insulating your incoming cold water pipes. If your basement is warm, the water will warm up a little passing through it, but the solution to that -- if you need it -- is to let the cold water run for a little until you're see water that hasn't been sitting around in your pipes getting warm. I say "if you need it" because I generally don't ...


5

I think Chris is right, warm moist air from outside is coming into the vent and condensing on the cooler inside surfaces. Fixing this could be as easy as fixing or replacing the outside vent damper so it closes properly. You could also go for a vent damper that installs within the vent itself. And finally, you can insulate the pipe so that the vent pipe ...


5

When warm moist air comes in contact with a cold surface condensation forms. There used to be these tank liners sold that you would install on the inside of the tank to insulate it. It keeps the outside of the tank from getting as cold to reduce or eliminate condensation. I did a quick search and couldn't find it anymore. I did however find toilet tanks ...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

It sounds like you're saying your basement is heated, but nothing else is (possibly the floor above is exposed to the outside). What you've done is put in insulation below the subfloor to try and keep the heat in the basement. This is a good idea, however, any time you have warm meeting cold, you're going to get condensation, and so you need a vapour ...


4

The only reason to insulate your incoming water feed is if there is a risk of it freezing during the winter, in which case it's essential. If it's properly insulated - i.e. there's no gaps in the insulation and there's no gap between the insulation and the pipe then you shouldn't have a problem with condensation as there'll be no way the warm moist air can ...


4

Condensation occurs when moist air contacts a cooler surface. Adding a storm door will make the inside surface of your front door less cool, and may help reduce the condensation. You may also have excessive humidity from (for example) showering without using an exhaust fan, cooking, etc. I would suggest getting a device that measures relative humdity ...


4

Insulation on pipes should prevent moisture in the air from condensing on the pipes, by preventing the air from coming into contact with the pipes. What you are experiencing could be caused by a few things. Insulation was not installed properly, and is not preventing the moist air from contacting the pipe. Condensation is forming on an un-insulated ...


4

Very interesting situation. First off, replacing perfectly good vinyl windows is not going to help you from what I see on your pics. Simple weeping drains around windows is not going to help much with all the moisture I see on walls, ceilings and floor. I would suggest you have someone come in with an infrared scanner and make a sweep of the building to ...


3

No. Insulation does not, by itself, cause condensation. Insulation (in conjunction with other factors) prevents condensation.


3

Sounds like the insulation around the coolant pipe needs to be sealed better (if air can't get to it, you won't have any condensation). See this similar question: Corrosion on copper pipes due to insulation (with foam)


3

You have probably fixed the problem - at least temporarily. The boiler requires that this condensation pipe is clear and unobstructed and removing the ice from the end has cleared the blockage. However, it's likely that the pipe will freeze up again - especially in this cold weather. The solution is simple - insulate the pipe. Either use something like ...


3

What you’re describing sounds like a combination of negative pressure in the compartment that the drain pan connected to and an incorrectly sized p-trap on the condensate drain. The depth of the t-prap has to be greater than the negative pressure in inches of water column of the compartment where the drain is connected to. A t-prap with insufficient depth, ...


3

This sounds like a good candidate for the procedure you outline, done with loose fill cellulose insulation, with two caveats. First of all, while this could conceivably be a DIY project, you can't rent a typical cellulose blower from Home Depot or the like because it doesn't have the power to really densely pack the stuff in there; as a result, the material ...


2

I had the exact same thing happen. In the attic rats had eaten away the rubber insulation. For some reason they love it. Water came through the ceiling into one of the bedrooms. An AC guy came out and said to replace the old insulation with new insulation from Lowes or Home Depot. Total cost of the insulation: $15.


2

The point of insulating pipes is to a) reduce heat exchange and b) prevent condensation. You likely want your hot water pipes insulated primarily because of a. But b could also come into play. It's extremely humid in LA. And if the water in the pipes sits long enough (overnight) to cool the water, then come the next day, you may very well get ...


2

While it is not a simple solution, one method of ensuring that toilet tanks do not sweat is the use of a mixing valve on the water feed to the tank. These valves mix hot with cold water to feed warm water to the tank. Warm water prevents condensation. The valve only needs to be set once unless you significantly change the temperature of your water ...


2

Any or all of your ideas will help, it largely depends on your climate and how long of a below freezing stretch you can expect. The drain outlet is supposed to be within some distance of the ground, 18" I believe, which is why it was configured that way. In areas subject to freezing, all piping carrying water should be run as far as practical inside the ...


1

With my furnace, I diverted the drain line into a 5 gallon bucket which I used to flush toilets. You could install a wye and a valve or two to make the condensate drain into a bucket inside the house on the coldest days. This may be a little too high efficiency, Worked for me. The tricky part is remembering to check the bucket.


1

There are at least four strategies: Decrease the relative humidity of the air around the toilet tank. Increase the temperature of the tank. Prevent the air around the tank from contacting the tank. Accept the condensation. Put a catchment underneath the tank. Decrease the relative humidity with a dehumidifier in the room. Also, heating the air around ...


1

Unfortunately, dehumidifying the interior air won't be enough during cold nights. A -5 to +25 °C gradient means that to prevent condensation, the interior relative humidity will have to be below 10%—which is unhealthily dry. From +8 to 25 °C is much better: Condensation will occur only at R.H. above 32%—dry, but somewhat comfortable. ...


1

Did the flashing repair involve removing/re-positioning the exterior trim/siding/sheathing? If so, the simplest scenario might be due to the insulation being disturbed/removed. You can check on the inside by moving a burning incense stick around the trim and window, which should reveal air movement. If you find a "windy" area, remove the interior trim ...


1

Just because you need a pump does not mean that the pump has to be right next to the air conditioner. As long as you don't exceed the vertical pumping abilities of the pump and the run from the AC to the pump is downhill, you could put it farther along the wall or even around the corner.


1

Insulation slows the loss of heat, it will not raise the temp of the wall above the dew point unless there is a source of heat inside. (Heater, leakage from another source, or a day/night average temp above the dewpoint. You may be best looking for a way to lower the humidity in the space. Removing standing or leaking water, finding vapor leakage from ...


1

In case you haven't noticed, weather varies ;) This alone could account for the different effects each winter. But I think you're right, other factors are at play here. Ventilation. Your gross vent area is 1/100 the attic area, accounting for louvers, let's say about 1/150th of attic area. If you do not consider the gable ends as cross ventilated, it is ...


1

Well, it turns out that it wasn't water coming through the foundation wall. Right above the area in question is the main service panel for the house. Water was slowly seeping in through the conduit, and actually into the breaker box itself (eek!). It was then dripping down through the insulation, and along the poly. An electrician friend has seen this ...


1

I don't see that there's anything wrong. Condensation happens... on any surface that's colder than the dew point of the adjacent air. If anything, it's showing that it was worth doing. Despite only being a few mils thick and easily heated, it's much colder than the inside air due to heat loss through the windows. Without it, the windows would be sucking heat ...



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