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1

CLR is what you're looking for. I had a similar problem as you (I was cutting metal on my driveway and did not sweep up the fines that night...Rusted the next day!) and it worked like a charm. It comes in a grey bottle with a multicoloured label. Dilute using the measurements on the bottle, and scrub hard with a stiff bristled broom. Rinse well. This ...


2

Assuming that this is a new 4 inches of floor on a ground level structure... No this is definitely not ok. Greenboard is mold resistant. It is, however, still just gypsum with paper over it. Neither is using pressure treated wood as a barrier. Why? Concrete wicks water. Any water near the area will be distributed to be brought into direct contact with ...


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I wouldn't fasten any wood (even pressure-treated) to undergrade concrete without a vapour barrier in between the two. Concrete is porous, and will without doubt enable moisture to wick into the wood, leading to rot or mould. It's not difficult to run a 12"-wide strip of polyethylene plastic under the wood, which will extend the life of any wood on concrete, ...


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I'd trust construction adhesive without any mechanical fasteners if you fit your new wall framing snugly. The friction provided by well-fit studs along with the glue will result in a bond that won't likely ever move. Exceptions would be if you intend to ever mount very heavy items on the wall, or if you have heavy solid-core doors in that location. All ...


1

I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...


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No you can't do that. Even in Arizona. Wood has a high expansion and contraction ratio, they would work themselves out of the mortar in under three years in the driest of climates. Your best option would be to membrane underneath the boards, secure them with concrete nails, and epoxy, or caulk the joints. That might last a year. In terms of code, in the ...


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Ed is right that any grinder for concrete will handle thinset. However I doubt that the thinset is grindable. When thinset goes onto concrete there is no molecular bond that causes the thinset to stick permanently to the concrete. In fact it expands and contracts at different rate as concrete so it is actually "moving" all the time. Thinset works ...


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I was thinking of a grinder like this disc for concrete I have one I bought years ago for my 9" grinder the disc is 12" it will take a entire single bay garage floor surface in about 2 hours. Cheaper than shot blasting and my disc has done 5 or 6 garages and still has a couple left. The trick is to keep the grinder moving in overlapping orbits. the link ...


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We generally don't recommend self leveling alternatives on a substrate other than concrete, vibrations over time can affect their stability. Best option is shims and plywood. That being said, you're asking for a self leveling option. Your best bet would self leveling concrete, you'll need to pay attention to the substrate requirements, it says it accepts ...


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I had 4 bags stored in my garage, I thought I would be able to use it if it hadn't turned into a brick. It was hard but I opened a bag and it was still somewhat "powdery" so I mixed it up for setting a Mailbox Post. A day or so later the post was still not set. The little extra pieces were not hard and crumbly. So, I guess it does have a shelf life, even ...


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If you have aprox 3' in the ground and cement around the post it will work (I have a 14' tube gate on a 4x4 just 1 post). I have quite a few of these on my property (+ 10 at least to fence horses) where I could not sink the post deep enough I added a small 6" tire to the end of the gate it carries the load.


2

No. Those holders give virtually no torsional support. Your gate will tear it right down. Plan on robust posts in a substantial concrete footing to carry that torque load. Either that and do what I did and run some snow fence on a pair of 1/4" vinyl-coated cable. The gate won't contain a toddler, and the snow fence wouldn't either, but it gives a visual ...


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Option 1(clean finish):Rough cut the iron, bar the concrete, and pour a top layer of grout or thicker layer of concrete. Option 2 (rough finish, what you're doing): Rough cut with rip saw and finish with grinder. Option 3 (rough finish, completely removes visible pipe): Clear adequate space around the pipe below the concrete for a cast iron pipe cutter ...


1

For anyone in the future, in most areas with not insignificant snowfall this is not code. Upwards of 6" of clearance above ground level (grade) is required to minimize moisture rot, specifically, after the buildup beam (min 5.5"), joist structure (min 3.5"), and boards (min 1") and variance (~.5"). Your deck will fall at a minimum of 16.5" from grade (the ...


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You can always drill into the concrete (behind the foam) and use a 4 or 5" concrete screw (Tapcon). Should be good for 300 lbs per 1/4" screw. Don't hit any wires or pipes burried in the foam


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There are two primary types of anchors for concrete. I'd trust either if properly installed. Holes must be drilled cleanly and to the proper size. Bolts must be of the correct diameter and length. Both require fairly large holes (7/16" to 5/8" or so). Sleeve or Wedge Anchor (with integrated bolt) Lag Shield (with standard lag screw)


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Since nobody else it going for this, then I'll give my two cents (based on limited experience, so please, anyone else feel free to chime in). When it comes to concrete roads, for example, after patching it a few times the road eventually becomes too worn out, and the concrete is rubblized (into crush and run). Then fresh pavement is layed on top. Here's a ...


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I would use the HRWR admixture to help seal the concrete. Alone, it might not be the best roofing solution, but it's well worth the minor cost for the extra protection. The biggest problem that I heard was foot traffic. Normally I would recommend EPDM, but I'm not so sure about foot traffic. This sounds more like a terrace, in which case, silicone cement is ...


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I would not trust admixtures to make concrete waterproof. Concrete in inherently porous and hygroscopic. Adding things to concrete still leaves it concrete with these properties. Point is it is the wiser to cover the concrete with something water proof. Waterproof materials typically will be a solid sheet of something like metal, plastic or "poly...", ...


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As requested,,,,It is hard to say how deep to dig down. When houses are built the contractor levels the ground and fills in shallow spots (much of the time). The trick is to dig down below the top soil it may be deeper. I usually find 6-8" gets me below the top soil but there have been a few that were closer to 18". I back fill the hole with crushed quarry ...


1

The 4" to concrete figure you see is a minimum clearance value, and really has nothing to do with the size of the footing required to support a load or prevent twisting or uplift. The size(volume) of the footing is what your engineer calculates out to have adequate mass to support/hold down your structure. One thing I noticed on the spec sheet you linked to:...



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