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I can't recommend adding a plastic moisture barrier between the pads. Really if you have moisture in the soil then it needs to work its way out. Moisture comes out of concrete all the time - we only see the worst case scenarios. If you leave the plastic in there then the water will get trapped on the bottom slab. Very good for the short-term. Long-term ...


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For what it's worth, what I wound up doing is using the Floor Muffler underlayment, which is its own moisture barrier. As per the directions, I applied it over the subfloor and about 2" up the walls. It's hard to see, but I have indeed left an appropriate half inch expansion gap between the wood and the drywall. And this is engineered hardwood so I don't ...


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The technical term for what happened to the concrete on your driveway is that it "spalled", and sealing it with caulking isn't going to do much toward repairing it at this point. What you'll want to do is clean out all of the loose debris (a shop-vac and wire brush work pretty well) and then pressure wash it. After it is completely dry, inject or force ...


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The right way, is the hard way, as always. Remove all the paint off the wall, using a scraper, or a heat torch, or a paint remover. Sand paper all the wall. Remove all the dust from the wall and wipe it clean. Do many layers of sealer or primer. Let it dry for 24 hours. Do many layers of good quality paint. Let it dry for 24 hours.


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There are stucco crack patch products out there. For lack of a better explanation, they are essentially sanded caulk: Use that to fill in the cracks, then paint over with proper stucco paint (breathable latex).


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I have a similar problem, but worse. I think im going to put concrete backer board, like what they use to tile bathrooms, on the outside of the edge of the porch, then cover it up with the morter you see covering the edge of your concrete already. To attach it, ill drill holes and use anchor nails or screws and adhesive.


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That is an expansion joint you are seeing. The material is 1/2" thick and something close to old style Celotex or beaverboard really soaked in asphalt or tar. It isn't much of a thermal break, but it is better than the masonry surfaces touching. Although it is available wider, it is usually only 4" tall. Either a bearing surface or gravel is below the 4" ...


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The first issue is the moisture in the concrete - where is moisture coming from? Is the foundation sealed correctly? Even if you're dealing with drainage, you need to make sure that the basement has a proper incline (and make sure that the floor is sealed) directing the moisture towards the drain. This is a good place to start: ...


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Although I agree with Johnnyz that it seems harmless. I would fill it with outdoor caulking. I'm not sure what your climate is but if water gets in and freezes then you have a bigger crack.


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One way to get you siding off the concrete floor would be to trim it up 1/2 to 3/4 inch with a sonic crafter or something like that. You could then caulk the sill. I'd wait until it dries up a bit first.


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Just to circle back on this... my radon contractor stipulated that a polyethylene layer is needed for radon mitigation, and my crawlspace contractor agreed. The crawlspace contractor broke the concrete in a pitchfork-shape (to get good radon coverage and get around some concrete footings that are supporting the steel I-beam). He then dug a trench, put ...


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I just went through the process of removing a broken-off fence post without removing the concrete pier. Tough job! I expected it would only take a couple of hours, and that replacing just the post would be easier than digging out and breaking out the old pier, disposing of the concrete, and pouring a new pier. Maybe not, though, especially if the old post ...



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