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I can tell you that I have mixed latex paint with Portland cement(Mortar mix). I put the slurry into a spray hopper and sprayed my concrete block wall. I wanted the wall to match the house in color and finish. It worked perfectly. I did this in 2008, and the wall looks as good today as the first day I sprayed it. The wall has an adobe finish, and the grout ...


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it looks like an older product called rockote. its basically a polymer modified brick mortar thats used as a non EIFS stucco finish. i think they still sell it in australia, but you can ask at your local old school lumberyard. the old guys there will know what it was and suggest a replacement. if you can't find one, you can use dyna ceraflex 610, but not ...


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As has been mentioned course washed sand has been mixed into an exterior house paint, but it failed to adhere to the cement surface. This may be due to poor prep work or non-compatible ingredients in the paint. It's best to scrape/wire brush the loose paint followed with a scrubbing of water to remove dust. Note if the water is being absorbed by the cement ...


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That is a rough texture achieved by putting sand or sand-like particles in the paint. From the looks of the first photo, those are very coarse particles. When you buy exterior paint, grit is an option. Sometimes it is a really good idea, for example, if you are painting porch steps where you need friction to avoid slipping and falling. I would scrape and ...


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You almost certainly do NOT want to cut off the rebar in the columns as suggested by @EdBeal - that should be tied in and/or bent and tied in to the rebar in the beam. I'd think long and hard about just raising the upper floor by another 40 cm rather than chiseling all those columns - but if they are freshly poured, you may find that they will chisel ...


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It doesn't look to me like the slab has shifted, since the crack appears level and isn't terribly wide. I would contact a concrete contractor, one that specializes in repairs, if there is erosion under the slab they can usually pump a slurry under it to fill in the void. Is your garage floor "Floating"? Look around the edges, if the floor goes under the ...


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It should be fine all on its own, but if you want to be really really totally sure, just sand a bit to expose some of the CMU surface in the high areas.


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It's a process, not a "special" material. A good steel trowel job can give a glass-like finish on standard concrete. It's partly technique, and partly timing (or timing is part of the technique.) Troweling knocks down larger particles and brings up smaller ones, resulting in a smooth finish. In many places it's too smooth, IMHO - easy to sweep, but also easy ...


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If you want to get a smooth finish after-the-fact, there are some great products out there that will set smooth and very thin - a real 'feather edge'. I recently used Henry FeatherFinish Patch and Skimcoat to prep a rough and uneven concrete floor before laying luxury vinyl tile and was really pleased with the results. Once mixed, it spreads like butter with ...


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step 1 - patch the hole with a concrete mixture of your choice. premixed bagged concrete is available at any building center. you can look up how to do it on youtube. step 2 - once your patch is cured and finished, get a bag of polymer modified (its very important it be polymer modified) tile mortar (pmtm) that is okay for exterior use (dyna ceraflex 610, ...


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A rotary hammer is the standard tool for a job like this, with a carbide-tipped masonry bit. You can rent a heavy-duty model at your local rental center. They're not difficult to use. Be sure to wear ear, eye, and resipration protection. As for your question about depth, you haven't provided nearly enough information about your plans for anyone to ...


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I just purchased a house in the United States, Pennsylvania to be specific by a lake and I was considering pouring concrete over the floor which is identical to the floor pictured above. However I was told that this type of floor was designed this way for drainage should water enter the space...makes sense to me now. The wood floors that have since been ...


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AAC block is known to have better thermal insulation than brick. Based on my unmeasured observations, a 220 mm brick wall is probably a better sound insulator than a 100 mm AAC block wall. Different materials will absorb/filter different frequencies (thermal energy or sound), so a combination of both brick and block should provide the most comprehensive ...


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If you don't have to make the overlay "very thin" and the patio is structurally sound, there's not a whole lot of "bonding" needed - a 1-1/2 - 2" thick overlay on a sound, solid concrete substrate will happily sit there, unless it has voids to encourage spalling (by filling with water and freezing) in the winter. As it happens, that looks like a pretty good ...


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First I want to point out that the hardness has a lot to do with cure time and temperature. Longer cures (6-8 weeks) at cool temperature (say 50 °F) are harder. Short, hot cures are harder initially, and crumble later. Generally, the 1pt cement : 2pt sand ratio is best and will have a 3500 psi compression stress. A 1:3 ratio will have less than 3000 psi. ...


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I have always used bricks. A flat brick placed in cement form 25" X" will take you 18 bricks laid flat. 58 times of this will equal 60 feet each road side, so 60 x 2 x 2.25 thickness gives the following materials: 20 bags of pure Portland cement 30kg 40 bags or equivalent of 1/4 inch crush stone for the mix 42 bags of sand Ratio: Mix 1 bag Portal, 2 bags ...


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Cut slots in the concrete close together with an angle grinder and diamond blade, knock off the little ridges you have just created, and then either flatten with a cup grinder or level up with compound.


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If you live in an earthquake zone, it may already have a feature to prevent that, such as a central steel pin. In any case, slap-dash "reinforcing" can have effects opposite what you expect (could be your new system would break the post where it entered the concrete by concentrating forces there) - and the rot issue was already pointed out by #2448131 I ...


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Concrete does not react well with normal wood, so don't pour up along the post. That's why the little block is on top of the pier you have, its made either of pressure treated wood, or redwood. If you really want a better pier, pour one a little larger then what you have, and you can include a metal hold down or strap to make sure nothing moves later. (and ...


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For 20 square feet of concrete I would simply saw it off the adjacent patio if the strip is not a separate pour and then break out the strip with a jack hammer. Haul that away and then re-prep the base for new concrete. In the case of the tree roots just chop them out of the way. This will give you the cleanest solution with the longest life. Trying to ...


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In your shoes, I'd do this: Trench out along the concrete strip to give yourself access to the soil under the raised portions of the strip. Make the trench 6-8" below the bottom of the concrete and wide enough to work in. Determine whether there's remaining root under the concrete. If so, dig and chop it out completely. Using a water hose, begin ...


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You definitely want to leave an expansion gap. However, you can fill the seam using a flexible material. Foam rod covered with a seam filler, is one common solution. There are also products sold that can simply be pushed into the seam. Check your local hardware/home improvement store, to see what's available in your area.


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Beams rarely follow curves in cases like this. Put a standard beam at the height of the zenith and frame down to shape the arch, thereby creating the proper rough openings for the windows. Install the center post under the beam.


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You're asking 3 questions, so I'll address them separately. In the future, please ask one question per post. There's no reason other than aesthetics and strength that you should extend the slab below grade. Since your step will be 6" thick, strength is not an issue. Use inexpensive substrate rather than making your slab 10" thick. As far as substrate ...


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And the WINNER is................................"remove all " I have the problem of three uneven steps that need the height adjusted, the slope of the first step outside the threshold, and extend the three of them. The absolute simplest, after extensively pursuing this research is: The more cures the higher the risk. Tear everything out. Worth the work for ...


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Hairline cracks are not a problem. If they get to 1/4" at any point, then you probably need to have an engineer give it a look over. However, not sure if radon gas is a problem in your area, but cracks in the basement will let radon gas seep in, so it would be worth your time and the money to purchase a radon gas detector. You could probably call your ...


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If there isn't a lot of seasonal movement, it won't matter. I'd layer a small amount of sand as a pad and leveler (plus landscape fabric to control weed growth if you like) and go with whatever looks nice to you. If things do move a fair bit, smaller pavers will handle it better and be less likely to break over time.


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Welcome to crap construction in the 21st century, where nobody gets basements, just footings, and those that do get basements get 4" slabs on sand often above the frost line. Whether water comes in is a function of the water table in your area and whether you have proper drainage on your property. There is nothing you can do except install a sump pump. ...


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Concrete slabs crack. Period. For this reason, "control joints" are often cut or tooled into slabs where aesthetics are a concern. They encourage cracks to occur along straight lines where they create less of a visual blemish and can better be accommodated by expansion joints in rigid flooring. In your case, it's not likely a concern.


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The next steps depend upon whether you intend to do the work yourself or not. If DIY Purchase bags of premix (cement, sand & aggregate) such as Quickcrete. Mix up a batch and then pour it into place and trowel to be level with surrounding concrete floor. If Not DIY Contact handyman or concrete specialty professional. Make appointment for them to ...


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I don't see why your idea would not work. Yes, you will need to remove the siding where your ledger attaches. You will have several important considerations: water intrusion at ledger board location. You will need to ensure that area is properly flashed and sealed, and try not to damage the waterproof membrane under your existing siding. roof slope and ...



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