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I hope t is obvious, but don't pour directly on the wood, The concrete wont cure right and the wood will fall apart. Heavy plastic or backer board would have to go down first. I doubt even a lathe and bar reinforced layer will avoid cracking. Joists bounce under load, bow when the temperature or humidity changes, and houses settle. Anything thick enough ...


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This one is simple, perhaps surprisingly. Buy a gallon can of mineral spirits (paint thinner), NOT the water-based type, but real MINERAL SPIRITS. Taking whatever reasonable precautions are necessary to protect your eyes & hands (I personally feel comfortable working with bare hands), wet down a rag thoroughly with it and scrub the floor. The mineral ...


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In my current house the front rooms have a crawl space (about 3' deep) under the original victorian flooerboards. There is laminate on top of the floorboards and a very thick rug. When it is cold outside, the floor is also quite cold, even if you are on the rug. In the back rooms the previous owners filled the crawl space and poored concrete floors (not ...


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An epoxy floor coating might provide a similar aesthetic to stained concrete due to diversity of finishes available. As a bonus: it is likely to be easier to create consistency of appearance. it is unlikely to require the substantial structural retro-fitting that is probable when pouring concrete over the crawlspace of a typical wood frame residence. it ...


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Frankly, Stacey, the thought of a concrete-over-wood floor frightens me badly. IF you can determine that your existing framing can carry that much additional "dead load", then definitely rebar and remesh (the mesh) well or it'll crack. You should know that the floor will want at LEAST 2" of thickness, which means each square foot of flooring will weigh at ...


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From the description and photograph, it appears that the crack is the natural result of the sort of stresses one would expect at a location with: Drastic change in slab width to extend the slab through the door opening. Drastic change in thermal stress where the slab transitions from interior temperatures to exterior temperatures. Drastic change in slab ...


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Eww. 1.5" is a terribly thin pour - getting an effective repair is going to be difficult. My general approach would be to break out the whole section from the crack to the control joint outside the garage, and the loose pieces (or make some new edges beyond the loose pieces) in the thin slab over the precast substrate and repour the whole strip. With a ...


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Try this guide. step-by-step and easy to follow! http://www.gardenbuildingsdirect.co.uk/blog/build-a-shed-base/


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I'd go for a square joint with a form. If you are using reinforcement (either as a part of the structural design for the slab or simply as an anti-crack measure), carry it through to stop any possible differential movement. That said, the concrete within two adjacent slabs poured within a relatively close period (approximately 3 days) will fuse as the cement ...


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A machine screw anchor is a good option for repeated removals and reinstallations. They're also available in standard thread sizes, so they can accept machine screws, eye bolts, or hook bolts. The downside is that you'll have to buy an inexpensive but specialized setting tool for each size of bolt you want to install. The installation process is much like ...


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No, they won't work there... but there are similar expanding anchors that CAN be used in concrete, with threaded holes so you can remove/reinstall hardware at will. Don't get the lead (lead metal) ones, get the steel ones. You can even get some with male threads, onto which you could install a loop nut.


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Stop and think for a moment. What are the consequences of the ceiling FAILING because you drilled holes in it and hung weights from those holes? Is it possible that the ceiling may fail catastrophically? You're also weakening the upstairs neighbor's floor, which may at times be very near its design limits. What happens if you're hanging from one point while ...


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"no fines concrete", eg no sand is not used when making the concrete. No-Fines Concrete is a method of producing light concrete by omitting the fines from conventional concrete. No-fines concrete as the term implies, is a kind of concrete from which the fine aggregate fraction has been omitted. This concrete is made up of only coarse aggregate, ...


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Not saying I'm an expert, but I did just finish scraping up about the same square footage of old mastic (asbestos-free!) from my basement. Obviously the real answer is to try various things to see what works best, but in my case, I found a long-handled razor scraper and a lot of elbow grease managed to get up the majority of my problem. Because the mastic ...


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First: as someone said in the comments consult your landlord because he/she might flip out to find you drilling holes in the masonry walls. Second: During your conversation with the landlord find out whether your walls are masonry block(cinder block) concrete, rendered brick, etc. I think it highly unlikely you have plaster and lathe. Third: the anchor you ...


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Your hunch is correct - the anchor bolt in the picture obviously isn't doing a whole lot. If the scabbed on 2x4 bothers you, just remove it, cut the existing anchor bolt off flush with the concrete, and put in a new anchor through the center of the base plate.


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Cement is a powder, so I doubt your walls are cement! You might have lathe-and-plaster walls. (What country are you in and what year was the apartment built?) If your wall covering is sandy plaster, then you would attach light shelves and pictures by pre-drilling holes with a masonry bit and using expanding anchors or toggle bolts. Heavy shelves or ...


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I realize this answer is 4 years after the question but concrete-form walls have a tendency to stick around for a good long time, so... The concrete form system in the house I am building has vertical plastic strips spaced at 8" on center and running within about 1" of the top and bottom of the form. (So if you look and or dig from the top you won't see it ...


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Duct tape a square patch of clear plastic sheeting to a bare unfinished spot on the floor. Seal all edges with duct tape and wait 2 days. If there is condensation on the underside of the plastic or a dark damp moist square of concrete under the sheeting... you have a moisture problem contributing to the issue. You did not mention the reason you are priming ...


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The problem you are having is not uncommon. It is a basement floor so im guessing below grade. There should have been a layer of 10 mil poly under the floor when it was poured but either way concrete leaches moisture. This is a contributor to your problem. IF you didnt thoroughly wash the floor (i mean powerwash) with a bleach based cleaner you will have a ...


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Hi I had the same issue and some similar thoughts. I tried the drilling out process with and extended drill spade bit, But could not drill all of the post out. In the end I was able to remove all of the remainder by driving a stainless steel tube down the hole cutting the rotten post out a chunk at a time. Then sliding another smaller tube down the middle of ...


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Unless you have a particular reason to think your garage is sinking into the ground, I wouldn't worry about this much weight. Presumably the existing asphalt floor can support the weight of a car, which has more than 500 lbs of weight per tire (concentrated on a much smaller contact area than your safe). Besides, what's the worst that could happen? If in a ...


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Base on your description: Concrete strength does not appear to be an issue. With a minimal 2500 psi concrete the entire safe could bear on one square inch. The size of the footing depends on the bearing capacity of the soil. Suppose the soil has a bearing capacity of 20 pounds per square foot. Then the foundation would need to be 25 square feet. Other soil ...


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Unfortunately, your real problem here actually isn't that you have cracks in the cement; it's that your cement has developed several cracks in 2 days. They are a symptom indicating that the cement is weak (typically because it was not mixed correctly; most often, it's too wet). Nothing you do to repair the cracks will fix that weakness. The right thing to ...



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