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The problem that sometimes occur with basement concrete floors is if no vapor barrier is underneath than any ground moisture can permeate through the slab and into your living space. So if you happen to install a floor covering any moisture is going to get trapped underneath. This will cause any number of problems usually it will weaken the glue's bond ...


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Spend $50 on a non contact moisture meter rated for concrete. Make sure your system is ok with whatever level you have spring/fall.. Floor grinding with a diamond cup grinder, followed by SLC (self leveling compound) for the low spots would minimize the SLC needed. Follow your vinyl flooring manufacturer for sealing/curing/dryness.


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For a lower cost solution, talk to your local conservation district; instructions on how logging roads are built is available. I'm also looking into EcoGrid, Hoofgrid, Stabiligrid sorts of products. Seem to run $3..$6 per square foot, 20+ year life. For 100' x 12' = 1200 sq ft, $3600..$7200 plus grading and gravel though. Geotextile might be required ...


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No this is not okay - especially for a new house. If the builder is saying it is okay, run away from this house because you have no idea what else they have screwed up. You can't put a post on a slab if it is structural (i.e. not decorative). A concrete slab is not designed (and shouldn't be) to handle structural loads like this. The concrete looks fine. ...


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Run away and do not look back. Anyone showing a new home with a flaw such as this is waiting to sell someone a "bridge". This is a text book scenario of Buyer Beware


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One thing that I have learned in my short life, is that when you are buying a house, always put in clauses so you can get out/get money removed from the asking price if something like this is found to be wrong. With a home inspectors and an engineers opinions, you may be able to get a sizable portion of the price of the house knocked off. Not an expert ...


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I'd like to add another vote for "this looks bad". To proceed with buying the house, get a written report from an engineer and they use that to get it fixed, or get an allowance at closing to get it fixed. Are there other support poles that the same thing could happen to?


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You don't give very much information, but just looking at the photo the "foundation" looks like crap. It looks like it is way too thin and the concrete is cheap. Of course, that is the construction style in America now, build crap houses out of crap plywood on crap "slabs" 2-inches thick then wire the whole thing with crap Romex and plumb it with crap PEX ...


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This may be a problem or non-problem depending on the foundation construction. You'll be much better off consulting an expert who knows how foundations are built in your area and how to diagnose them. One option is that the foundation is designed with separate large thick concrete pads that bear the load and then the space between them is filled with ...


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No, the actual plug is made of a flexible rubber/plastic. They are (SealTite Termite Bullet Plugs) Some of the holes they drilled probably did not go through the slab due to hitting steel re-bar. If There is dust in the holes, it should be over 3" down in there if the drill went through the slab. Therefore, the holes that didn't go through the slab are ...


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Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


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I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


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If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


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This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


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I was looking up how to stop floods then voila!! It came to me floodwater safety barriers!!!!!


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By looking at your photo of the plug, it looks like the termite technician did not install the plug fully into the hole. If properly installed, termite plugs made from rubber or plastic need to be drilled out or pounded through the slab. I have been doing termite work for 22 years using these and other types of plugs and have never seen one properly ...


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what you can consider rather than sono tubes is hardboard or plywood. I've formed raised circular garden beds using 3/4 inch plywood. Cut the plywood to height and length. Next cut (a tablesaw helps alot) a series of saw kerfs spaced about 1 inch apart and 1/2 inch in depth. What I did to make the actual forming of a arc easier was to cut several cleats from ...


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The item you have pictured appears to be a precast fire ring. Several companies manufacture them specifically for fire pits. Depending on pricing and availability, it might be a lot easier, and possibly even cheaper to purchase one instead of trying to create your own. Since these are specially made for the purpose of being a fire pit, the manufacturers ...


21

The simple way to "achieve that shape" is, of course, to buy it precast, which is almost certainly what the picture is - depending on size, it's either a section of well-casing, drainage pipe, or a manhole extension. @BrownRedHawk is correct that it may (indeed, probably will) destructively deteriorate if used as direct fire containment - the interior ...


2

If you'd like to minimize use of concrete, don't use any. I have 4 sheds that have been sitting for 14 years on sections of pressure treated wood, set on top of the ground - and a 5th that's on 4 pressure treated wood posts set into the ground. No concrete at all. Wooden floors (not pressure treated - only the ground-contact wood is PT.) Nice and dry.


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It is very unusual (and usually obvious that it's NOT the case by inspection around the edges) for the floor to be in any way supporting the walls. Normally, it's footings, then walls, THEN floor; and the floor is not in any way tied to the walls. There are a few buildings with "bathtub" foundations, but they tend to be major projects floated (somewhat ...


3

Well, a (concrete slab) floor is just a floor, supported by its substrate. You may have some subsidence afterwards, so I'd advise my tips here, especially the one about undermining it a little to lock it all in place once you re-pour. Rebar is a must. Done right*, I have no concern for the foundation. I'd be worried that there's a pocket under the slab ...


2

Either it is a load bearing pole or someone who built the post was just practicing their pole making skills. You can remove it when you offset the load to another part of your house. Usually this would involve putting up an overhead beam and 1-2 poles to hold that. This is very specific to your house and taking out a concrete pole will definitely involve ...


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Use an alkaline cleanser to get the hydrocarbon (oil) stains out. Cleaners and degreasers are available from many sources (use google).


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You could use a heavy duty drill and a diamond encrusted bit, such as this one They can be found on-line and in some big box stores for about $20. When grinding or cutting very hard materials like concrete, you should use a lubricant to reduce heat. Usually a small constant drip of water at the cut point helps. Images and links for illustration only, ...


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Depending on the depth of the pits, you might be able to use sanded grout to get a nice smooth surface. Just be sure to let it dry and cure before laying down the flooring. You may need to apply it in multiple coats to get a perfect surface.


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I'm adding my own answer since I tried to use the rasp. It didn't work. The rasp can ease hard corners on cinder block and even a little bit on concrete, but it won't bite enough to enlarge a hole. The method I use was a hammer drill with a chisel bit. I hold the chisel against where I want the edge to be and pressed the trigger very slowly. I did this so ...


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This is the correct tool for rasping concrete but it won't fit in a 2" hole. I suppose you could ruin a file (and the better part of a day) to get it done; CMU's aren't that hard. source


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You do not need to prime a previously painted concrete surface. The oil residue will cause adhesion problems with any surface coating, including "problem surface" primers. You need to use a detergent (or TSP) and warm water solution with a scrub brush and wash the oil residue off of the walls, then rinse clean. Then apply a high quality paint with top of the ...


1

Yes, you can and it will work. It will also dull your rasp.


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The metal on a wood rasp would be way to soft to make any type of dent in the concrete. The only thing you will do is destroy the rasp. You should use a roto hammer with the proper sized bit to widen the hole.


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Assuming the slab is generally structurally sound, a patch for this hole should be fine. If the structure is OK, the chief concerns are safety (so nobody trips over this hole) and sealing of cracks in order to prevent further moisture seeping into the concrete and causing further cracks during freeze/thaw cycles. You can use concrete for the big hole and ...


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Knowing that the earth has subsided from underneath the porch (and it's all cracked, anyway), I'd ask for a discount along the lines of what it would cost to bust it up, throw it away and re-pour it. I bet I could sink that porch into the basement with a hammer. Move on to the next house, unless you both want to play the discount game. If you're going to ...



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