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You should try to get things that have height off your floor. A little glue stained on your floor, paint, stuff like that - won't hurt anything. The thinset will bind to that just as good as the concrete. So you want to make sure anything sticking up is scraped and anything that is loose. Leveling is not a must. Most basements slant towards the ...


0

I just finished wiring a home that was built with the ICF. What I did was start at one corner of the home and measured how far from a certain corner each vertical wiring run was, how far from the floor (or ceiling) each horizontal run was depending which one it was closer to. I also indicated the length of each run and beginning and end. I did the same for ...


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In my opinion, it is better in the long run to use concrete footings and concrete piers. You can use pressure-treated but do not use typical pressure treated lumber, you should use something with a treatment rated for ground-contact/in-ground use. The advantage to burying your posts is little to no lateral bracing is needed and it is less work over all. ...


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My solution was to grind the high side down with a diamond wheel on an angle grinder until the surface was reasonably level, apply an epoxy filler, and cover the floor with an epoxy chip floor that will cover any further imperfections.


1

This simplest tile transition is the integral metal edge. It comes in quite a few profiles, some of which can handle a small amount of elevation change. If you need something more elaborate I'd really need more details and hopefully some pictures.


1

In the installation instructions for water heaters that I could find, they all say that this "parking block" is required. Installation, Operation, AND service Manual for Residential Storage Type Gas Water Heaters THIS WATER HEATER MUST BE LOCATED OR PROTECTED TO AVOID PHYSICAL DAMAGE BY VEHICLES OR FLOODING. Installation Instructions and Use ...


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Bleach and water do work very very well, though they are hard on the worms, they come out of the ground where the run off spills over, thus a sparing amount in a sprayer works well and is economical, just dilute somewhat and spray on. I mist the concrete fairly well prior to spraying, I also like using a stiff brush to distribute well and rinse before ...


4

Another alternative would be to fur out the ceiling and install a drywall ceiling on top of your existing ceiling. This would give you an area to run new, concealed wiring. Another benefit to this is that you wouldn't need to scrape the existing ceiling which can be really messy (not to mention a lot of work), and you will need to mud/tape and paint ...


5

While that might work, I doubt your HOA would allow grooving the ceiling because the concrete is part of the common structure. Instead, install flat conduit. Or flatwire. Or maybe you might like a beam which could conceal a wire.


6

Quick answer.... NO. You will need to get bits designed for concrete. Concrete is very abrasive and will destroy a wood bit in microseconds and not do much of anything to the concrete.


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Any holes in stucco should be patched with Portland cement plaster (stucco). An exterior electrical box should somehow be fastened mechanically to the structure (bolts, cement screws). Once pipe fitted and fastened, filling the gap around the box should become obvious; small enough for caulk, or needing patch. If the hole is large\uneven and you do have to ...


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they make specific boxes for masonry. these are sealed a bit better than a typically 4 inch square. you can get these in single gang, up to almost anything multi gang or gangable (single gang that join to other single gang to make what you need) You must use rated wire or conduit with compression connectors for this application as well.


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Concrete has about the same expansion rate due to temperature as steel [this is why reinforced concrete does not break apart from thermal stress]. A stone walls are likely have another coefficient of thermal expansion (and perhaps some other constraints). It is sound practice to isolate slabs from existing structures absent a compelling reason to tie them ...


-1

I do not think you need an expansion joint around the edge. The concrete should shrink slightly as it cures, and create it's own expansion gap naturally. However, I am not familiar with your loacale and the environmental conditions and building codes. I would suggest speaking to a professional if you're unsure. A simple phone call to your local building ...


1

Being Brass, the anchor is nice and easy to drill, Just get a Steel drill and slowly drill into the remaining anchor. once you have drilled through 90% of the brass, take a long nose pliers and "implode" the rest of the material into itself.


2

A slide hammer would be the most likely to work in that case. Drill a hole in the broken part, screw in the tip of a slide hammer, hammer it up and out. Using a penetrating lubricant and a screw extractor to get the broken threaded part (only) out would be an alternate approach. Be sure to apply anti-seize to the threads of all the ones that still work, ...


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I have been a fence contractor for 25 years. It is important to keep the soil away from the base of the post. Wood rot starts there because of moisture, microbes and fungus. Post rot does not start underground because there is no oxygen there or fuel. It is important to crown or slope the concrete above the grade to keep soil away and so water runs off ...


2

One solution, if you have some space to work with at the foot of the concrete steps, is to add some new steps constructed with pressure treated lumber. Here is an example to convey the idea. The unevenly spaced original steps are replaced with a new set that are evenly spaced from the ground level up to the top. In this example I show the use of 2x12 ...


4

You might want to contract a civil engineer to help keep the concrete people honest. If your engineer provides them with mix specification and makes test cylinders from each load, that should keep them on their toes (even if you don't follow though with testing the cylinders - they don't know if you will or you won't, so they have to assume you will - which ...


0

When I did my deck I preferred to dig down, use a quikrete concrete form to bring it above level, then mount the post to it using hardware. Reason being if something were to happen to the post (rot or need to replace for some reason) it is easier to do it with this method.


1

If you can dig down 4 feet, it's really easy to put a sonotube down and fill it with concrete and put the 6x6 (you might only need 4x4...depends on deck dimensions) on that. source: that's what I did.


2

It works for pole barns, it will work for your deck. However, be careful of the quality and/or treatment of your PT lumber - I've seen pressure treated lumber rot off in the ground despite being pressure treated. I think the thicker sections (such as 6x6) are rather difficult to get throughly treated all the way through. I've seen some pole barns use 3 2x6 ...


1

The classic way to get a great finish on a concrete tabletop with minimal tooling is to pour it (upside down) on a glass sheet. If your table is smaller than a patio door, you can generally find a free patio door that someone has removed if you look for a while on craigslist or other classified ad sources, or check at the local recycling center. The main ...


2

You can always use a masonry grinding wheel and a level, but be warned, there will be a LOT of dust! You'll want to seal off the room from the rest of the house, open the windows, put fans in the windows, wear goggles and a respirator. They sell shrouds that you can hook up a shop vac to the grinder to get a good bit of the dust, but it's still bad. And at ...


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I ended up doing an 8" footing of crusher run gravel, tamping it in 3" layers and then getting a few new solid blocks to run perpendicular to the recycled blocks for stability. This ends up being a "floating" structure. Test Fit: Gravel: Stacking: Done:


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You easily can go over old thin set with no problem,as long as it is down good....I have done whole house on top of strong bonded oldthinset....it is actually a benefit to the instsllation of the new tile....only a pro can understand what I mean....but trust me ,it is okay


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I just bought this. It is cheap and aesthetic: http://www.homedepot.com/p/FreeGarden-EARTH-82-gal-Enviro-World-Compost-Bin-EWC-30/204841192


0

How about dry stacking them and using 4x4s inserted inside and buried in the ground


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Dry stacking and filling with rebar and concrete sounds like a great idea. Pretty easy and brainless.


0

Check out Sackrete Top'n Bond - a patching cement with latex additive. It's great for patching concrete, adheres well and is quite strong. It's easy to apply and is intended for this use. Just check color first.



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