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1

Unfortunately, your real problem here actually isn't that you have cracks in the cement; it's that your cement has developed several cracks in 2 days. They are a symptom indicating that the cement is weak (typically because it was not mixed correctly; most often, it's too wet). Nothing you do to repair the cracks will fix that weakness. The right thing to ...


1

Treat it like you would ammunition. If there's no corrosion, they're probably fine. If you start using it and you get misfires, dispose of it.


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While their power may be degraded, using them is not likely to be dangerous. The barrel of the nail gun is what really contains the blast.


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You should be able (with a cheap metal-drilling bit you don't love much) to drill those out and try again. Drill them out, use a correctly-sized masonry bit to drill the holes larger, vacuum all the dust out of the holes, and set new anchors. Perhaps set the anchors a bit deeper to compensate for the slight spalling at the surface here. You can use ...


1

The concrete looks fine, other than a little surface damage (and obviously the holes themselves). I would drill them out, then fill the holes and damaged area with hydraulic cement. Make sure you use the drill bit specified by the anchor manufacturer next time. These shouldn't be that difficult to insert into holes.


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Another option would be to apply stone veneer to the faces and top of the steps, making it look like stone steps. I've considered doing that with mine.


1

Use wood to cover the end of the gap, mix cement and pour it in.


2

Unless the existing window is leaking, the sole criterion for judging better and worse options in this case is the likelihood of future bulk water infiltration. The current installation is performing functionally and aesthetically as part of the building envelope. Breaching and patching the envelope is not a repair, and at best will only perform equally ...


0

If you just bury it, it's a potential leak and/or maintenance hassle waiting to bite you later. And hiding it makes noticing, finding, and fixing the problem harder when that happens. I have several windows under my own porch (with security bars, which I consider absolutely necessary in that situation!), and am seriously considering closing them off ...


2

There's no problem per-se with covering it up. However, with a windows there's lots of chances there for leaks. And since you can't see the window from the outside and it will be behind a wall inside, you probably won't be able to see any evidence of damage or leaks until it's too late and caused significant damage to your new walls and flooring. Based on ...


0

I would use a setting joint compound (maybe durabond) rather than mud because it's more durable and moisture resistant. It's more time-consuming to sand, however. Either should stick to concrete and both should get a coat of primer before painting. If have old or really glossy concrete, you can prep the surface with a little Muriatic acid to etch the ...


0

I would not hesitate to skim over clean dry concrete with drywall mud. As long as the concrete NEVER has a chance to get wet.


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My understanding is that air entrained concrete is only possible with ready-mixed concrete.


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To get air entrained concrete similar to that which you'd get from a ready mix delivery, you'll need to add an air entraining agent to your mix. Without getting in to serious mix design, for all practical purposes, a 4:2:1 (stone : sand : cement) mix will likely suffice for a walkway. If you're really bothered about cracking, include a layer of smaller ...


3

Depends on where the natural water table is and how much pressure it can put on the pool (which is a function of the porosity of the earth immediately surrounding the pool). If you know the bottom is above the water table you can leave it empty until the ground freezes. Otherwise you're counting on the water table level and surrounding soil to not exceed ...


0

Dry pack it what I learned to call it. It is a regular mix of concrete, but it has just enough water added to it to get the concrete to "kick". This amount of water is so small, it is just enough to get the concrete to hold together when compressed in you hand with a strong squeeze.


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There is a concrete that I have used, and it is regular concrete, and perhaps it can have gravel in it, but the type I have installed did not use any gravel/aggregate. Dry pack is what I have learned to know it by, and stone setters use it for building walls and laying flagstone sidewalks. I have used it for shower bases over PVC liner and coated it with ...


2

Would this work? Or is this too close to other buildings?


3

You have got your work cut out for you if you plan to do this by hand. I really would have you consider renting or hiring a backhoe or mini excavator to do this. If you feel you really need to do this by hand, you will need to get at the minimum, an electric demolition hammer, at the most an air compressor and jack hammer. Break the concrete down about 6 to ...


3

If they had a 32' play structure resting on top of them and they had 6" U brackets I'm guessing the footings are at least a foot in diameter? Maybe more? Keep in mind that even if you could dig the entire thing out of the ground it's going to weigh hundreds of pounds. Unless you have some heavy equipment to pull them out you're going to have some trouble ...


0

I have heard of wrapping the bottom of wood fence posts with rubber flashing, or (better) "packing" their end grain with epoxy, to reduce the rate at which the wood takes up water and hence discourage rotting. I haven't heard of plastic wrap being used for the purpose. And I have no idea how either would interact with concrete. In fact, the advice I've ...


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I have been told to use a dry ballast/cement mix using minimal water to avoid too much moisture getting to the post, I have also treated them all before installation


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Damp Proof Membrane To prevent dampness getting through a ground bearing concrete floor should be protected by an impervious layer, usually a 1200 gauge (0.3mm) heavy duty polythene damp-proof membrane. The DPM can be positioned either on the sand blinding or on the concrete slab. Joints in a Polythene DPM should be welted or taped and should overlap by at ...


0

Concrete will never fully cure; it continually hardens forever, although for all practical purposes, it reaches a point where further hardening will be so slow as to unnoticeable. Unless the mix has retarder (or some cement replacement material) in it, it will generally be hard enough to walk on in less than 24 hours. Mixes are usually specified with a ...


2

Outdoor carpet ~$6 a square yard. Most people think of the good ol' green stuff, but there are many styles to choose from nowadays.


2

It depends on the composition of the concrete mix, water content, and temperature. Generally, concrete sets in 24 to 48 hours allowing for you to walk on it and partially cured within a week (keep the cement free and clear of heavy equipment during this period) at which you can continue building/construction. Most mixes fully cures at 28 days. Refer to the ...


1

I have used Rust-Oleum Epoxy Shield on a few concrete applications and I have to say it may be the "cheap"/non-fancy alternative but it has handled soaking into the concrete (instead of other paints that only sat on top of concrete) to provide a little more protection. I have bought the two part epoxy speckle kits and have never been happy after a few ...



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