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I would lean towards constructing an elevated platform inside the doorway. It would only need to be large enough to park and safely mount/dismount the mower. You could construct it like a backyard deck, perhaps adding steps down into the main floor area. This would be relatively easy to construct and inexpensive, especially compared to anything messing with ...


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The below grade floor in this structure begs the question as to if you have problems with water getting inside? If you had a door how in the world were you getting into and out of the structure? One guess is that there must be a two step stair or landing down into the floor area. So the obvious solution, if the door is wide enough, is to replace these steps ...


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Best advice is to dig the whole thing down to the level below frost line. It is also the standard practice to put down a bed of gravel at the bottom and lay in a reinforced concrete footing that lies completely below the frost line and is wider that the fence support wall. Say 12 inches wide. This gives the poured wall structure something solid to sit on ...


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It looks like it has been repaired before but not correctly. Without putting my eyes on it of course I would go the route mentioned in earlier post. However if looking to save money you could also drill 1/2" holes insert 1/4 rebar after you fill it with liquid nail. Clean any excess immediately. Then simply reparge all the steps. You would have to drill to ...


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You're a metal worker? How about stainless? This DiY Headstone suggests high strength mortar mix. You should use colorant to achieve your final color instead of attempting to stain it afterwards, which would only be skin deep. However, this is why you use granite: I'd suggest Uba Tuba for its flakes: Truly though, what I'd recommend, is having a ...


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Concrete pigments are available. But for what I think you are wanting, you would start by grinding/sanding the block smooth, then painting it (black) with an epoxy base coat, then sprinkling it with decorative metallic/colored flakes (the loose fines are cleaned off), and then a clear epoxy top coat is layed over it. Here's a youtube video for this ...


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I'd remove the wooden post, do a full repair of the broken step, and install a bolt-on steel or aluminum post with a vinyl cover on the step below. Of course, this requires a rebuild of your rail assembly to extend it, but it should be full-length anyway.


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The compounds in epoxy paints are mutagenic and are to be avoided. Always use a respirator or supplied air mask.. A common misconception is it takes years of exposure to cause problems, which is compounded by the fact cancer takes years to grow to a detectable size.


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As long as the total contact area of the footings in consideration of the load bearing capacity of your soil exceeds the total dead & live load of the patio, then it won't settle into the ground. As long as the footings are below the frost line, they themselves will not frost heave. However - if the slab is still in contact with the ground, then it ...


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Those "straight lines" are control joints (as opposed to expansion joints). The contractor knows that concrete slabs invariably crack, and they install those to make the cracks less conspicuous. That said, you do seem to have more cracks than I'd have expected, and they appear more open than is typical. The one is oddly close to the exterior wall. I'd ask ...


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In case anyone is interested here are the finished steps. The contractor was able to reinstall the existing hand rails. They are a little corroded but a coworker suggested using marine jelly to remove the rust then we should be able to paint them. The contractor needed three days to remove the old steps and install the new steps. We paid an extra $500 for ...


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I believe that they are pavement ants (Tetramorium caespitum)... but I can't be certain. Boring holes in concrete does not seem to be one of the characteristics of this insect, aside from a few colloquial reports. At any rate, sevin-liquid (aka carbaryl or 1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) works. Using a syringe to fill the holes that they bored seems to have ...


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Insects are incapable of "eating" concrete, but they do tend to exploit weak or damaged concrete to access something more appealing, such as a food source or nesting site. It only takes a small crack in an otherwise secure concrete foundation to let termites in. Poured concrete is the most reliable, but if you have a block foundation, the mortar is ...


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I would not put my faith in a regular toggle bolt. The small bend pin that acts as a hinge for the wing to pivot on and are critical for its integrity seem weak at best. I would rely on it for shear strength rather than tension. Here is what I would use instead...


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Would a skim coat (specifically, this product) cover it up or would the ghosting still show through? Ghosting is caused by matrix changes. A skim coat will have a different matrix and should cover it perfectly well. That particular product has good reviews (on Amazon), so I would bet on it. Ghosting is common with microtoppings, but having a ghost (a ...


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I have a feeling that your ghosting is here to stay... I think the skim coat idea is not good, unlikely it's going to be very durable. I'd consider staining it to a more uniform color and then sealing it.


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If you don't simply have the concrete company screed it for you (a good idea), hire a helper for an hour or two so you can screed sensibly from outside the forms. The difference between you walking down the middle of the slab and trying to fill your footsteps and them doing that is that they have some experience with filling footsteps when they HAVE to walk ...


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Use a milk carton as a forms, tape them to the floor and fill with concrete or patch, starting with the lowest corner and level each of them. They do not need to be very thick, but now you ave four sturdy, level pads for the washer feet to rest. You could put a plywood platform on top, but you really just need the 4 pads.


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When concrete is mixed it has air trapped in the mix. When pouring walls we use vibrators to get the air out. With smaller pours hitting the forms with a hammer helps.


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CLR is what you're looking for. I had a similar problem as you (I was cutting metal on my driveway and did not sweep up the fines that night...Rusted the next day!) and it worked like a charm. It comes in a grey bottle with a multicoloured label. Dilute using the measurements on the bottle, and scrub hard with a stiff bristled broom. Rinse well. This ...


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Assuming that this is a new 4 inches of floor on a ground level structure... No this is definitely not ok. Greenboard is mold resistant. It is, however, still just gypsum with paper over it. Neither is using pressure treated wood as a barrier. Why? Concrete wicks water. Any water near the area will be distributed to be brought into direct contact with ...


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I wouldn't fasten any wood (even pressure-treated) to undergrade concrete without a vapour barrier in between the two. Concrete is porous, and will without doubt enable moisture to wick into the wood, leading to rot or mould. It's not difficult to run a 12"-wide strip of polyethylene plastic under the wood, which will extend the life of any wood on concrete, ...


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I'd trust construction adhesive without any mechanical fasteners if you fit your new wall framing snugly. The friction provided by well-fit studs along with the glue will result in a bond that won't likely ever move. Exceptions would be if you intend to ever mount very heavy items on the wall, or if you have heavy solid-core doors in that location. All ...


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I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...


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No you can't do that. Even in Arizona. Wood has a high expansion and contraction ratio, they would work themselves out of the mortar in under three years in the driest of climates. Your best option would be to membrane underneath the boards, secure them with concrete nails, and epoxy, or caulk the joints. That might last a year. In terms of code, in the ...



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