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2

I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At ...


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If it's a small area around the drain, the lowest cost, least-fuss option is one of these grinding blocks (use with some water and you can mop the slurry up rather than deal with dust in the air. Plug the floor drain first.) The one with the grooves is most applicable.


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A big 7" angle grinder with a diamond cup bit would work nicely. You can also get away with the 'masonry grinding' bit sold at big box stores. You should try to get a dust shroud as well, as even a small amount of concrete grinding will send fine dust everywhere.


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From the description, I suggest renting a proper concrete grinder (bottom of the page) from your local rental shop or big box. This will allow finer control and result in a flatter, smoother surface than if you attempted to use abrasive or diamond-bitted handheld power tools. If you'd rather not go that far, an angle grinder with an appropriate disk would ...


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You do not want to just place the concrete tiles on native ground soil. A proper installation would be to dig out the native soil down to a solid base. Then lay in a layer of crushed rock to aid in water drainage. Directly under the concrete tiles would be some sand that makes it possible to level and even out the tile installation. With the correct ...


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Both sand and soil will not hold up long as water flows through the cracks the slabs will sink when driven over. At a minimum 3-4" of crushed quarry rock heavy compacted. Concrete under the edges to tie them together would be much better at least 2" thick in my opinion.


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In my last house a daylight basement the original sheetrock was glued to the cement walls with liquid nails that worked very well. I did pull it all out and add furring for electrical spaces. (I don't like exposed conduit and surface boxes in a room that became my man land). If you are worried about cracking at the sill add a accent trim over the gap.


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One possible solution (there are no doubt others, and I'll be interested to see what they are) is to set a strip (4 to 12" wide) of 1/2" cement-based tile-backer board at the bottom edge of the drywall.


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Do what the bag says. Some products, such as this one recommend you pour the concrete into the hole dry. Optionally this foam-based product is lighter-weight and will be easier to remove when the wood invariably rots away.


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If the PVC drain indicates the age of the plumbing and the house, or at least when the slab was installed, there should be a layer of poly acting as a moisture barrier in between the concrete and gravel. Aside from that, all you need is to add the original gravel back into the hole and repair the vapor barrier and finish off the fill with a bag or two of ...


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If you had one of those drills with a hammer setting rather than an actual hammer drill then that would explain it. Like this one. You need an SDS hammer drill like this. Before you buy one just for a small project, see if there is a place to rent one near you. In the US, Menard's rents tools for small projects. Most rental places have them. You may have ...


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In lieu of expensive underpinning or buttressing, you could use tie-bars and plates. This method is commonly used to strengthen old brick (or other masonry) structures in areas prone to seismic activity. You would drill through the foundation walls below floor level and run several iron tie-bars all the way through, with gusset plates on the outside. On ...


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A new garage is like five grand... Foundation work on that building has got to come to at least half that, and then you've still got a rotted liability sitting on top of it. If you're going to do it yourself, you're looking at a hell of lot of work, for a building you'd better be in love with or have historical restrictions on. If the foundation is ...


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I know this is an old question, but here's what I did: (1) drill holes in the concrete. Yes, this is a PITA, but with the right bit it is not too bad. The holes do not need to be huge, nor do they need to be deep if you use the right screws. (2) Use the right screws. The ones I used are from a standard Big Box store, and are specifically designed for ...


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No, you will need to use masonry paint. I recently had dry wall put up in my basement, so now I have a room that is half drywall and have concrete wall. I was told that I needed to use separate paint for the concrete walls.


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having set thousands of posts of all kinds and sizes, i would offer this thought - its not the concrete speed or strength that matters, its the straightness of the post. and fyi, nobody who makes a living building fences mixes their concrete outside of the hole. they either use premix or they add powder to water right in the hole. it works just fine. and ...


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For fence posts you really do not need the quick setting type. If you are using 50lb bags it tells me that you are likely working with the small batch pre-mixed material. If that is the case the first posts you do are likely to be setup long before you get to posts 49 and 50.


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I would acid etch the old cement with a strong muriatic acid solution to clean and make the surface rough. Then add a adhesive promoter like Moos milk painted on the slab that will help the cement bond and reduce cracking. I have done this on floors as thin as 3/4" and as thick as 2" with good results. With a thin slab a fine aggregate like 1/4" will also ...


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Any concrete that is wet enough to flow into that space is probably too wet which weakens its strength. "Pouring" concrete is a misnomer. When it is properly mixed it has to be placed or pushed into position. I don't think you a footing anyway you just need to replace the soil that was washed away. Usually concrete slabs for roadways are supported by packed ...


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I ended up using a product from HD by custom building products called SpeedFinish (for about $16/box). It is a portland cement based compound designed to level floors. The box says it cures in about 15 minutes. In reality it took a few hours before it fully hardened. I was able to build up the low spot of the concrete floor (i used 3 10lb boxes). I was ...


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Isherwood's statement is correct in that basement floors are smooth but the surface is made smooth using a power trowel. A power trowel would be much too large to use for your application. I suggest using an aggregate free Portland cement and sand (or silica powder if its available). The ratio is typically 1 part cement to 3 parts sand and water of course. ...


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There are multiple options depending on your budget. 1) using interlock build a retaining wall to stabilize the soil/gravel/concrete under the steps. Not cheap but give a nice appearance and will last a long time. This requires that you: -dig a trench next to steps about a foot deep -layer in 5/8" crushed gravel and compact -build up the interlock ensuring ...


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Plywood. Lay down some sheets and connect them together to stop them shifting if you want to keep them there for a significant period.


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you dont want to use concrete as the aggregate in it will prevent you from being able to feather out your patches. you can use plain tile mortar and trowel it in and smooth it out (just like a drywall patch). just make sure you use a good quality polymer modified mortar.


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your prep seems fine. probably great. i would do the following: 1) fiberglass backer mesh on all surfaces. since its concrete, probably a 2 oz is fine. your fiber admixture makes the slab stronger, but a layer of sub-mortar mesh ensures that the tiles move together if the slab moves or cracks. this way you have less chance of tile breakage. 2) use a ...


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Well...I had to live and learn. I used 12 inch sonotubes with the same anchor and cheap cement (the fence post kind that was recommended to me) and 6 x6 posts, which turned out to be a bad idea. 2 of the 4 cement piers cracked part way down where the achor ties were. My solution was to build 21 inch squares around the base about 12 inches down and past the ...


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I'm sure the following is just for the money, but here's the cut-n-paste answer: Storage Conditions Protecting building materials from water and weather elements is important. Exposure to the weather not only damages building materials by moisture intrusion, but it also causes other harm not immediately obvious. Examples include: – Moisture can affect ...


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I would wrap it in plastic. The rain won't intrinsically hurt it but mud and other particles could ruin some of the ability for the thinset to adhere.


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You certainly wouldn't pour dozens of yards of concrete in there. You'd remove the organic soil, fill it with sand, and pour a 4" slab on that after setting up the plumbing. Alternatively, look at an internal drain tile loop, along with some ventilation. It would be fairly easy to trench in perforated and socked pipe inside the footing. The tough part ...


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First, re-grade & sculpt the yard as well as possible. Mound-up the front to create a dam effect & also create relief gullies along the house sides so surface water can flow readily around the house & can't sit to soak-in. Like, your front door may be a step up from the front walkway, you'd re-grade up to the door threshold & do a flush new ...



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