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Well, lacking a picture for now (try it again, please, and don't delete the link text it puts in on the bottom - that won't show up in your post, but it will let us see the picture) If you have a concrete floor now, you can break out bad concrete until you get to good concrete, put in some crushed rock for a sub-base and pour new concrete. Depending what's ...


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Other than taking a jackhammer to it and doing it right from the bottom up, (or turning it back into a carport): Lay 6 mil plastic in a continuous sheet, place 1 or 2 inches of XPS rigid insulation sheets, pour 2" of gypsum cement (might as well place radiant floor heat tubing while you are at it, even if you don't have immediate plans to use that.) A ...


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You can almost eliminate the permeability of the concrete by sealing it with silane/siloxane sealers. Next step up would be roofing material designed for waterproofing flat roofs. (See related: How should I waterproof a concrete roof?) Beyond that you have to establish a pitch to prevent standing water.


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Don't try it; run the other way with your money in hand instead. The building is seriously defective beyond your control as a prospective condo purchaser, as Fiasco Labs very correctly points out in his comment. Besides, if they're rotten enough to "fix" a footing while leaving the superstructure unrepaired, what else will they have in store?


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Just finished removing tile and thin set from a small (5'x5') bathroom floor an hour ago. I use a wide cold chisel and hammer to remove the tile. I found it was much more productive to cut through the grout lines first with an angle grinder and diamond blade. You could use a circ. saw but I didn't have one on hand. I used my shop vac to collect the dust ...


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Yes, you can cut concrete. You could hire someone with a concrete saw to do the work, or you can buy a masonry blade for a standard circular saw. Make sure you wear goggles and a mask to keep concrete dust and chips out of your eyes and lungs. It is noisy (and slow) so please wear ear plugs also. You will have to make sure the trench slopes towards the ...


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This is what I ended up doing after some research and opinion asking: Chisel all the loose concrete edges so there is an undercut. This prevents the patch in the slab from rising. Backfill with sand. As you put the sand in moisten it and tamp it down. Make sure the piping is well supported and that the closet flange is level. Keep adding sand until it ...


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Being a concrete cutter, I personally would Remove and do a proper pour. The current concrete looks hand mixed and poured at different times with different aggregate... It will only continue to get worse, if its structural definitely replace it with modern concrete. Quite a expensive job. If its structural You can shore up everything very easily, demo old ...


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(I'm assuming that you are in the UK). Concrete floors without DPM are not unusual in houses of that age, so there is a possibility that it's not a cowboy job. The broken bitumen you mention was probably the remnants of an asphalt DPM over the slab. The wood has (as you suggest) likely been used to level the concrete. If they were previously joists for a ...


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Bare copper will eventually corrode if it is in left in direct contact with concrete over time. You can try wrapping the pipe in duct tape and then covering it with sand, then skim coating over the top with concrete. That way, you could get access to the pipe again if you needed to.


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I would definitely not fill it with concrete until you know what function the pipe has. If you think that it will affect your flooring installation (it might), I would use a more easily removed material to fill the void. Good luck removing a concrete patch without destroying the pipe if for some reason you needed in there someday. Some flooring leveling ...



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