Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If u can get some out of the bag mix a little water in it and see if it sets up properly. Otherwise it likely is no good.


1

That is really sketchy. Built-up 2x4s aren't great for carry loads - something like a 4x4 is much much better. If you want to replace it, a temporary support on each side, take out the wall, dig out a section of the floor, and then pour a footing underneath, let it cure, then put in a replacement post. Steel is a lot more common for this usage than wood.


0

Hmm, this definitely looks structural. Any time you see 2 or 3 2x4's nailed together like that it is usually for some kind of header. The other issue I see is that it looks like regular 2x4's and not pressure treated. Anytime you have bare wood sitting on the subfloor, it should be PT. I would definitely put in some supports before you do any cutting to the ...


0

I think the white spots are lime leaching up to the top. If the concrete stays wet, that is hard to stop. Sealing the concrete can help but it can wick up moisture from below too. I stained an interior slab and haven't had this problem but I think there is plastic below the slab. But personally I think your concrete looks fine. I would find another project ...


0

Removing and Replacing a Bathtub http://www.homedepot.com/c/how_to_professionally_remove_a_bath_tub_HT_PG_BA In most cases, removing an old bathtub is a project homeowners who are handy with a few common tools can do themselves. Removing an old tub is a labor intensive project and often involves some demolition of the area around the tub. Tubs can be ...


1

Piles to bedrock (essentially what you are proposing, albeit with really short piles) is an excellent foundation. I'd suggest drilling some holes in the rock so you can pin (with steel rebar) the base of the concrete post/pile into the bedrock. I don't think you'll have any issues with the freezing - it will happen, but the bedrock isn't going anywhere, ...


1

You don't construct houses on sand. Sand can't be compacted and, as such, will never be a solid piece of earth to place a foundation on top of. Houses that are built on beaches are typically built upon concrete piers which go down to solid earth under the sand. Ideally bedrock. As for what kind of foundation you need (or are even allowed to have) it will ...


1

You can rent floor grinders. Properly set you can take off a very thin amount of concrete/paint. Then you would likely have to get the edges with a smaller tool. On a side note a slightly rougher surface will help your mortar etc stick to the concrete. I think you're correct in trying to get this up though. Seems like it could be a problem in the future. ...


2

I would use a heat gun. Been here before even on thick drywall with up to four layers of paint. Wear a mask and have good venting. Shaves off with a scraper after heating with ease. Not too close or it'll ignite. Wave it in small 6 inch circles and start in on the edges. Once it bubbles or humps it's ready to scrape.


0

I found I could get away with outdoor latex primer when resurfacing concrete with a thin layer of sand mix. I have also grown the technique using masonry screw drilled and placed into broken concrete which was then primed when Iwas faced with broken corners and edges of significant size. None have failed and it has been years. This was done at a multi ...


0

thinset removal bit $25 on amazon hooks up to an air compressor. .. gives you more control than a roto hammer. Been doing tile for 10 years and so far best bang for your buck


2

No, and no. Acid isn't controllable that way. And hydrofluoric acid is really nasty stuff.


0

According to Wiki-How, general purpose concrete is created using a 1:2:3 ratio of cement to sand to gravel by volume.


0

I built a similar thing out of 4x4 cedar posts and used "deck spikes" to hold the posts upright. That might not be the brand I used, I just went to a hardware store and bought them. In 20 years of having a LOT of kids climb and swing on it, it hasn't budged in the slightest. (We're in probably-not-as-Southern-as-you Ontario and there's been no frost ...


0

I put tie-downs in my driveway to guy down my boat canopy during the summer. I dug 2 foot holes, crisscrossed rebar diagonally into the ground, poured concrete, and sunk heavy duty eye-bolts with alternating nuts and washers into the concrete. I will be doing something similar this summer with posts, sinking them into concrete, with rebar through them.


0

No, you cannot repair them. If a large concrete structure is falling apart, it means the foundation is not good. Putting a deck over it to hide the disaster is probably a good idea. Obviously, you should make footings below the frost line for your deck, unless you want the same thing to happen to it. Personally I would probably build the deck and then sell ...


1

Ok, I'll keep this going and toss in my 2 cents worth. Dig a hole 6 inches deeper than you need. Add 6 inches of gravel. Pound it down with a fence post. Add more to bring you back to 6 inches. Repeat as necessary. Double wrap the bottom of the post with Grace ice and water barrier. This stuff sticks to wood like super glue. Finish the wrap a couple inches ...


0

The correct mixing ratio would be 1:1.5:1 — 1 cement : 1.5 sand : 1 gravel stones with 0.4 water. If you use more water it will leave holes (porosity of the mortar), and if you use less water, it will not lead to hydration.


-1

If the hole is 1 foot in diameter then each footing will be 235 pounds. I would probably make the footings weigh triple the weight of the above ground apparatus plus any people on the apparatus. Also I would have the top of the concrete at least several inches below the surface of the ground.


1

It is a little small, but yes you can support a 6x6 post on a 10" diameter concrete pedestal. However, any steel hardware you embed in the concrete to attach to the post needs to have proper clearance from the edge of the concrete. Code requires 2" clearance. Something like a Simpson PBS66 would work. Make sure you consolidate the concrete well, so you ...


1

Rent or purchase an engine hoist. The definition of a small easy to move hoist, and pretty inexpensive, with some level of engineering built in (while you can still hurt yourself with improper use, at least you remove one area of hurting yourself with improper kludging of a lifting mechanism.) They store pretty compactly and most can be easily taken apart ...


0

Cracking concrete rarely has anything to do with its thickness. If the concrete has no footing below the frost line, cracking is virtually certain in an area with hard freezes. If a no-load paving like a concrete sidewalk cracks, it is either because of a root, or because it is improperly drained. If concrete sits in water, it will absorb the water and ...


1

I had a similar problem, I made a 1" high, 3" wide concrete bump using some angled wood strips to hold it until set. The two strips were joined using small cross-bracing pieces of wood screwed from above. The strips were something like a 6 or 7 foot length of 2x1" wood at about 45 degrees to the ground. I made the concrete bump in sections that length. I ...


-1

My advice is never, and I mean NEVER fool around with water. Don’t just put some small barrier, because then water will stop at the barrier and from there God knows where will it go from there. You can cause much bigger damage than it is now. I know that you not going to like what I'm about to say but you really should rebuild entire driveway properly.


0

Yes, most likely that is water pressure causing it. Ideally, you'd install a drain tile system with sump pump to pump the water elsewhere, essentially redirecting the water. That is a very labor intensive and expensive task to complete, due to the labor involved. It does work very well, though. I've seen people get away with sealing the joint well with ...


1

Glue-down garage door seal (sometimes called threshold seal) sounds like what you want. A rubber bump.


2

Frost heaves are caused by water in the ground freezing and pushing up. The thickness of the slab has nothing to do with it. The force caused by ice expanding when it freezes is huge, and it's almost certainly not practical to resist it. Better to remove the force in the first place. There are only two ways to prevent frost heaving, and neither is perfect: ...


1

If you are only interested in thickness of your concrete slab there is a method to measure it. Sometimes when someone doesn't know the strength of some old concrete element which was poured by someone else people hire specialist for this; they use special tool which is cylinder shaped and which drills the concrete and extracts concrete cylinder, which than ...



Top 50 recent answers are included