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2

In my years in the construction trade, here is my synopsis of concrete floats and trowels and their uses. I will start with the screed. A screed can be as simple as a short piece of framing, 1X3 or 2X4, long enough to go from side to side of a concrete form, whether it be for a 12" thick foundation or a 3' wide side walk. For larger poured slabs the screed ...


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Put it in with some rebar dowels to be sure that there won't be any differential settlement of the foundations. You might need to underpin the missing foundation to properly support the blocks.


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A good way to determine the seriousness is to call an engineer, as you have done. Because soils can settle, water can degrade materials, concrete and other materials can expand and contract over time, storms exert wind forces, and seismic events occur, design and/or construction issues may express themselves in the structural system at any time. So may ...


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Mortared bricks settle much more extensively than plaster. Have a look at Chicago's 15 story masonry Monadnock Building, still settling since 1891 more than 20 inches. The building was designed to settle 8 inches (200 mm), but by 1905 had settled that much and "several inches more", necessitating reconstruction of the first floor.By 1948, it had settled ...


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An Oregon project. I soaked my 6"X6"X18' deck roof support posts with two coats of Flood preservative stain. The posts had been kiln dried then sun baked before treatment. The stain dried in the hot sun for a few days. The surfaces were then flooded with Helmsman Spar Urethane - 3 coats. The urethane extends up a foot above concrete to shed water. The ...


3

Void spaces are frequently used for utilities, it could be accumulated condensation. Leave it be and see if more water comes out to find out if it's an active leak. I hope you did not drill through an HVAC line or drain line.


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The issue is not the water-proof qualities of the concrete, it is the flood-proof status of the building. That status is largely a function of location. If flood water rises to the level of the second floor, the basement of just about any building will be full of water regardless of how it is constructed. General practice is to treat floods as statistical ...


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I think your best bet in this case is a pressure washer. If that doesn't work by itself you can put some solvent on it to soften it up, let it sit a few minutes then pressure wash.


0

You can try a heat gun and a putty knife. Heat a section until the adhesive softens, and then scrape it off. That should get most of it off.


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Concrete on its own might migrate some moisture, but can be used to create water tanks. Cracks however are not waterproof, and it's certain that your basement has some. Your concerns should resolve around humidity, mold and ongoing dampness, not overt flooding. And of course you'll need some video picture frames to compensate for the lack of windows.


2

Concrete on its own is a porous material. It may slow water down, but will not stop it. It is possible that the outside of the wall is waterproofed, but it's not a guaranteed.


1

Hydration is the chemical process by which concrete mixtures harden. Absent a retarding admixture, the hydration reaction occurs in any proper concrete mix. Wood, rotten or otherwise, is not typically a retarding admixture. Embedding rotten wood in a foundation is not consistent with good practice, industry standards, and building codes. Furthermore, ...


1

Highly recommend you dig out the rotted post, especially for a patio. Do it right the first time, going back later will be a nightmare. If you want to take the lazy way out, cut the post and bury it. Add another one directly next to it.


0

It goes by many different commercial names, but the generic terms is "Permious" or "Pervious" concrete. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pervious_concrete


0

It's been a long while since I worked construction, but I think I remember dowelling into concrete in a similar manner with a 1/2" drill bit and #4 rebar. We used a sledgehammer to drive the rebar pegs in. It MAY have been a larger bit, but I think I remember it being the same size.


2

Those "big wooden casts" are called "forms", by the way. Very often brick is chosen over concrete for its aesthetic value. It's also relatively easy to double-wall brick for insulation purposes, but it's extremely difficult to pour two good-quality 4"-thick concrete walls immediately adjacent to each other.


2

Consider this simplified diagram of the bottom of a house. The brick wall is part of the house; It has to carry the vertical and horizontal loads of the structure. Two story or eight stories, will look very different. But the design of the house will be independent of the soil conditions at the site. The green strip represents the footings. (They rest ...


1

Given a willingness and the ability to commit all the necessary resources, lowering the floor is entirely reasonable. Whether it makes economic sense or is even economically viable depends on the local construction and real-estate markets, the regulatory environment, and the financial, equipment and labor resources at the Owner's disposal. Viewed as a ...


0

The much more common solution for that problem is not to lower the basement floor, but to raise the house.


5

The concerns I'd have -- outside of whether there's anything under the floor that could be disturbed, and whether there's a rock layer under the floor that would prevent your lowering it -- would be: You're going to have to make sure this doesn't disturb the foundation. I'd suggest getting an engineer's advice before doing anything. You're going to have to ...



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