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It's either a continuous pour or it's not. Whether you have to 'bond' (use rebar/scarify) depends on the thickness of the new pour, the existing substrate and the expected conditions it will be subjected to. Excerpt from Bonded or Not, a discussion on pavement restoration using concrete overlays, by William D. Palmer Jr.: (concreteconstruction.net) ...


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Pine, sawn untreated. Pine - most typical for structure civil works, doesn't need to have some better grades or something. It's just for formwork after all... Sawn untreated - concrete doesn't care, so You shouldn't also. These planks will serve as another formwork or to feed some furnace.


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Even when swept clean I would not consider that a properly prepared surface for a threshold. Just the nature of the uneven surface of those filled concrete blocks would make water tend to collect underneath. You should use a concrete patch/resurfacer to create a smooth level (or slightly sloped away from the opening) surface, then attach the threshold per ...


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I don't live on the beach, but we do live in a desert where the soil is essentially sand. I remember when we were having our house built, like everyone else has alluded to, we had to have the foundation dug very deep to where the soil was actually compacted and poured the foundation from there. The best place to find out about the mixture for your area ...


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You should consider mudjack to fill the gap. I believe it is a dirt/soil concrete mix. There are contractors who specialize in this type of work.


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1/2" is a bit thin to span that distance, although it should not be a problem with a concrete slab above it. If you are worried about it and need to use 1/2" sheathing for other reasons then just install 2x blocking perpendicular to the joist at a shorter distance on center, say 8"-12" O.C. in the area of concern. As for the wall studs, we would typically ...


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You want to attach the ledger to the edge of a concrete pad? Sounds like a terrible idea to me. It's possible that an engineer could have designed a way to carry the load through the pad and into the ground, but that would have to have been done before pouring the pad. Attaching the ledger to an existing pad, will almost certainly crack, split, or ...


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My garage floor was not prepared property , I was not tamped before pouring thus a space between dirt and cement thus cracking because no suport. Dug out old concreat where there was cracks I then placed gravel under the existing cement and jammed with a stick best I could then levelled ground in hole filled with rocks inch in diameter then drilled holes in ...


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I feel that you should dive a bit deeper and resolve the root cause of your problem. 2" of subsidence seems to indicate a bit more work than simply using a self leveling material, you have support/foundation problems. Consult a professional foundation remediation contractor to see if you can get an idea of what the cause is. I would hate to see you "level" ...


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It can be hard to find someone to do specialty work like this. Typically when it is a specialized project, you simply need to find a sub who can complete the task proficiently. This may be a concrete contractor (larger areas), a flooring contractor (smaller areas), or a general contractor who has an arsenal of subs that they are familiar with and could ...


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Such an old question... Well, I'm not satisfied with all these answers, so I put mine. I'll try to wrap most of them together. General answer is: YES, You can. But, as with everything on this world, come pros and cons of such operation. pouring concrete on particle board isn't a good idea without any isolation (like a foil); concrete is wet (when ...


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I know that your question is a couple of years old, but I thought I'd post an answer in case you haven't figured out a solution yet. We had a chimney on our house that had been repaired. The new mortar did not end up being the same color as the old mortar that was used. We found a product online called Instant Mortar Match. The website is ...


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I know this post is from a couple of years ago. I'm not sure how your project ended up, but if you did end up using mortar, you can still change the color if needed. We had our chimney repaired and the new mortar color did not match the old mortar color. We found a product online called Instant Mortar Match. The website is InstantMortarMatch.com. We ...


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Lacking a specific brand from your question, I went and looked at http://www.screwfix.com/p/mapei-ultraplan-self-levelling-compound-grey-25kg/4959f Which states that it will cover (mixed) 6 square meters at 3mm thick. I make that 100cm x 600 cm x 0.3 cm or 18,000 cubic centimeters. Last I checked, 1000 CCs was a liter, so you have 6 liters of free space. ...


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That bucket is far too small. Normally, you want to get a "concrete mixing tub" (e.g., at Home Depot), which is broad enough to allow you to mix the water and the powder thoroughly. I usually use a garden hoe to do the mixing, which allows you to do it standing up. Also, the tub is very smooth on the bottom, which means that it's relatively easy to drag ...


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These pipes are way too close to the surface. Pipes need to be buried in sand or aggregate and then 3" of slab needs to be poured on top. The problem here is the initial design: the bathroom should have been relocated across the room where proper burial and slope could have been achieved.


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It sounds to me like the internal wall construction is made of cinder blocks. These drill easily as you describe and a hole drilled into the wall would have likely entered into the hollow cavity of the cinder block. I would strongly discourage you from trying to mount these brackets to such a wall as there is no good assurance that a strong pulling force ...


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This sounds like old school plaster on metal mesh, common for that era in apartments and condos. Hard as a rock. However, you'd have to open up the wall to find the concrete block that's most likely behind it, because the plaster is only supported by furring strips tacked into the blocks with nails. Do not be fooled if your stud-finder scores a hit. Don't be ...


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Do you suppose your walls are covered with something similar to this? http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Fiber-Cement-Board/1291501553.html It doesn't sound like the wall covering is structural. There must be studs in the wall. You could try a stud finder device like you can find at your local DIY store. You could try using toggle bolts. If you do, I would do ...


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DIY epoxy floor paints do not normally require respiratory protection during application (by brush or roller) as long as adequate ventilation is provided. These "off the shelf" products are designed for use by laypersons. What is "adequate"? Open all doors and windows, for basements or other areas with scant natural ventilation put a box fan or two in a door ...


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Those aren't sub layers. I would say those are actually just layers of paint. The mesh could be left over from a carpet that was once there. Potentially, that's the glue mixed with the carpet mesh that didn't get removed when they removed the carpet. Refinishing would require you to sand that baby down, and choose what you want to paint over it. Latex paint ...


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Leveling using mortar is not acceptable in so many ways, but most important one is that it would crack. Even if it doesn't crack (and it will) you will have a problem because it is workshop: every time you drop a hammer or something you will damage the floor. Self-leveling compound is the best solution, by far but if that is not the option than I suggest one ...



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