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11

Many vendors do recommend pouring the concrete in dry, but then they advise to pour a specific amount of water on top to immediately set, not to allow rain and ground moisture to cure the concrete. This lets you skip mixing in the wheelbarrow or bucket and then shoveling the wet concrete in with a lot more cleanup of the tools required. For strength, the ...


10

Personally I don't like concreting in wooden posts, because eventually they will rot and have to be replaced. Getting the old concrete out is then difficult. Ideally, concrete in a short concrete fence post and use coach screws to fix your wooden posts to these. The concrete will never rot, your wooden posts can be set off the ground, so will last almost ...


4

Using dry concrete is very helpful in places where a hose is not available and where tool cleanup is not going to occur within the next few hours. I have set hundreds (maybe thousands) of wooden fence posts with dry concrete with satisfactory results (0 fails). I've only done this in an areas with moist soil though, so this method might not work everywhere ...


3

You do not want to just place the concrete tiles on native ground soil. A proper installation would be to dig out the native soil down to a solid base. Then lay in a layer of crushed rock to aid in water drainage. Directly under the concrete tiles would be some sand that makes it possible to level and even out the tile installation. With the correct ...


2

I'm sure the following is just for the money, but here's the cut-n-paste answer: Storage Conditions Protecting building materials from water and weather elements is important. Exposure to the weather not only damages building materials by moisture intrusion, but it also causes other harm not immediately obvious. Examples include: – Moisture can affect ...


2

I would wrap it in plastic. The rain won't intrinsically hurt it but mud and other particles could ruin some of the ability for the thinset to adhere.


2

Isherwood's statement is correct in that basement floors are smooth but the surface is made smooth using a power trowel. A power trowel would be much too large to use for your application. I suggest using an aggregate free Portland cement and sand (or silica powder if its available). The ratio is typically 1 part cement to 3 parts sand and water of course. ...


2

For fence posts you really do not need the quick setting type. If you are using 50lb bags it tells me that you are likely working with the small batch pre-mixed material. If that is the case the first posts you do are likely to be setup long before you get to posts 49 and 50.


2

If the PVC drain indicates the age of the plumbing and the house, or at least when the slab was installed, there should be a layer of poly acting as a moisture barrier in between the concrete and gravel. Aside from that, all you need is to add the original gravel back into the hole and repair the vapor barrier and finish off the fill with a bag or two of ...


2

Both sand and soil will not hold up long as water flows through the cracks the slabs will sink when driven over. At a minimum 3-4" of crushed quarry rock heavy compacted. Concrete under the edges to tie them together would be much better at least 2" thick in my opinion.


2

In my last house a daylight basement the original sheetrock was glued to the cement walls with liquid nails that worked very well. I did pull it all out and add furring for electrical spaces. (I don't like exposed conduit and surface boxes in a room that became my man land). If you are worried about cracking at the sill add a accent trim over the gap.


2

I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At ...


1

From the description, I suggest renting a proper concrete grinder (bottom of the page) from your local rental shop or big box. This will allow finer control and result in a flatter, smoother surface than if you attempted to use abrasive or diamond-bitted handheld power tools. If you'd rather not go that far, an angle grinder with an appropriate disk would ...


1

One possible solution (there are no doubt others, and I'll be interested to see what they are) is to set a strip (4 to 12" wide) of 1/2" cement-based tile-backer board at the bottom edge of the drywall.


1

If you had one of those drills with a hammer setting rather than an actual hammer drill then that would explain it. Like this one. You need an SDS hammer drill like this. Before you buy one just for a small project, see if there is a place to rent one near you. In the US, Menard's rents tools for small projects. Most rental places have them. You may have ...


1

In lieu of expensive underpinning or buttressing, you could use tie-bars and plates. This method is commonly used to strengthen old brick (or other masonry) structures in areas prone to seismic activity. You would drill through the foundation walls below floor level and run several iron tie-bars all the way through, with gusset plates on the outside. On ...


1

I know this is an old question, but here's what I did: (1) drill holes in the concrete. Yes, this is a PITA, but with the right bit it is not too bad. The holes do not need to be huge, nor do they need to be deep if you use the right screws. (2) Use the right screws. The ones I used are from a standard Big Box store, and are specifically designed for ...


1

I would acid etch the old cement with a strong muriatic acid solution to clean and make the surface rough. Then add a adhesive promoter like Moos milk painted on the slab that will help the cement bond and reduce cracking. I have done this on floors as thin as 3/4" and as thick as 2" with good results. With a thin slab a fine aggregate like 1/4" will also ...


1

Plywood. Lay down some sheets and connect them together to stop them shifting if you want to keep them there for a significant period.


1

your prep seems fine. probably great. i would do the following: 1) fiberglass backer mesh on all surfaces. since its concrete, probably a 2 oz is fine. your fiber admixture makes the slab stronger, but a layer of sub-mortar mesh ensures that the tiles move together if the slab moves or cracks. this way you have less chance of tile breakage. 2) use a ...


1

You certainly wouldn't pour dozens of yards of concrete in there. You'd remove the organic soil, fill it with sand, and pour a 4" slab on that after setting up the plumbing. Alternatively, look at an internal drain tile loop, along with some ventilation. It would be fairly easy to trench in perforated and socked pipe inside the footing. The tough part ...


1

It is a good idea if heavy mixing and shoveling aren't in your best interest. Moisture is absorbed and distributed very well by capillary action and other mechanisms, and the concrete will eventually cure as well as if you had mixed it yourself. It will take a while in some cases, so the drawback is that the post may move in the meantime.



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