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I would use a heat gun. Been here before even on thick drywall with up to four layers of paint. Wear a mask and have good venting. Shaves off with a scraper after heating with ease. Not too close or it'll ignite. Wave it in small 6 inch circles and start in on the edges. Once it bubbles or humps it's ready to scrape.


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No, and no. Acid isn't controllable that way. And hydrofluoric acid is really nasty stuff.


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Ok, I'll keep this going and toss in my 2 cents worth. Dig a hole 6 inches deeper than you need. Add 6 inches of gravel. Pound it down with a fence post. Add more to bring you back to 6 inches. Repeat as necessary. Double wrap the bottom of the post with Grace ice and water barrier. This stuff sticks to wood like super glue. Finish the wrap a couple inches ...


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It is a little small, but yes you can support a 6x6 post on a 10" diameter concrete pedestal. However, any steel hardware you embed in the concrete to attach to the post needs to have proper clearance from the edge of the concrete. Code requires 2" clearance. Something like a Simpson PBS66 would work. Make sure you consolidate the concrete well, so you ...


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There are specific concrete color additives. I would use those. Not paint.


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You can pour a new slab up to the level of the foundation, not higher. In this case, you could basically fabricate a new concrete patio that's below the level of the previous one and build some steps leading down from the door to the patio. You could also forget about making a concrete patio and build a wooden (or composite decking) patio at the current ...


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You typically want pavers sitting on top of a sand and compacted rock base. This allows for some movement as needed and some drainage if needed. If you are in a freeze/thaw climate, adhering the pavers to the sidewalk likely wouldn't work very well as water will eventually get under the pavers and start cracking everything a it freezes. Ideally, you're ...


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If you are going to put 3" down you would be better served to do a new walkway. Have you looked into "slabjacking" or "mudjacking" to raise your old slabs. Might be cheaper if the surface of your old slabs is still in good shape.


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I have never tried to adhere pavers to a sidewalk, but can't say I wouldn't recommend it. Instead I would install paver edging along the edges of the sidewalk and set the pavers in between them. Then I would fill in between the pavers in with polymeric sand to lock them in. Paver edging:


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That is really sketchy. Built-up 2x4s aren't great for carry loads - something like a 4x4 is much much better. If you want to replace it, a temporary support on each side, take out the wall, dig out a section of the floor, and then pour a footing underneath, let it cure, then put in a replacement post. Steel is a lot more common for this usage than wood.


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Piles to bedrock (essentially what you are proposing, albeit with really short piles) is an excellent foundation. I'd suggest drilling some holes in the rock so you can pin (with steel rebar) the base of the concrete post/pile into the bedrock. I don't think you'll have any issues with the freezing - it will happen, but the bedrock isn't going anywhere, ...


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You don't construct houses on sand. Sand can't be compacted and, as such, will never be a solid piece of earth to place a foundation on top of. Houses that are built on beaches are typically built upon concrete piers which go down to solid earth under the sand. Ideally bedrock. As for what kind of foundation you need (or are even allowed to have) it will ...


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You can rent floor grinders. Properly set you can take off a very thin amount of concrete/paint. Then you would likely have to get the edges with a smaller tool. On a side note a slightly rougher surface will help your mortar etc stick to the concrete. I think you're correct in trying to get this up though. Seems like it could be a problem in the future. ...



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