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9

They look like the form clips where large forms were held in place to pour the walls. They can be handy as anchors if you add furring strips to drywall the walls instead of drilling for supports. They were just there for the pour and can be removed.


7

For form leftovers like this we usually hit them with the angle grinder and then go back and forth with pliers until it snaps at wall. I wouldn't just directly hammer these as you might be surprised at how big of a chunk of wall you take out with it.


4

They're left over from the forming system the contractor used. You may remove them by striking them sideways with a hammer or repeatedly bending them with any other tool. They're hardened steel and will snap off.


4

It's called terazzo: The basic process is: add your 'sparkle' substance as aggregate (glass is a typical option) pour concrete after concrete sets, you use a diamond grinder to expose the top layer of aggregate


3

I do light underwater work as a part of my job. One thing I do is drill in rock underwater with a CP9 rock drill. This is a pneumatic tool but is designed to work both above and under water. It works great as long as it is properly lubed before and disassembled and lubed as soon as possible after the job is done. I have no first hand experience of other ...


2

It's all in the aggregate. There are a lot of options depending on the look you're going for. Abalone shell is popular, and monochromatic glass chips could work well too. What you do is add a lot of these aggregates to your concrete mix (appropriately colored, and including performance-enhancing additives such as metakaolin or ground granulated blast furnace ...


2

The first question in regards to the channel outside the garage floor is to leave it be. It appears to me to be a sluice-way cut into the concrete to direct rain water away from the interior floor or to channel it in a safe direction. The photo doesn't show the bottom of the channel, but it's probably was cut after the driveway (not the garage slab) was ...


2

The answer is E. Not enough information. Even more important than the mix is what is under the concrete. If you poured concrete on granite bedrock you could probably put the heaviest piece of equipment in the world on it without any issues. The factors here: what is under the concrete. If it is a loose rock bed or there are cavities then it will hold ...


2

PC-Concrete is a brand I have used especially if you are going to paint over it. It is a good idea to acid wash the area (10% muriatic and water) then rinse. Once dry fill the area and let cure. Remember if you use Acid to add the acid to water.


2

My typical answer to these questions is talk to a Licensed Engineer because there are a lot of considerations that are needed. I firmly stand behind that. On this project make sure you're using the correct information. Water ~3,300 pounds Tank ~ 180 pounds, Concrete (4in thick without reinforcement) ~2,400 pounds Piping ? other accessories? Thats ...


1

If you can find the same size arbor (hole in the blade) it works great. A thin blade uses less horsepower but won’t last as long. Make sure to blow the dust out of the motor after done as it will shorten the motor life if left in the motor. I do this with a table saw and skill saw for brick and cinder blocks when I want a clean cut. Also wear a dust mask you ...


1

Laminated MDF is the typical form material (aka, prefab shelf boards). You can usually get the laminate in strips (for backsplashes and edge-banding counter tops). I'd make the square parts of the form, then use several layers of the edge banding laminate to create your curve. Create a curve template out of plywood, then glue the laminate around the curve.


1

Any type of thin plywood will do. Cut it into 6 inch strips and it bends easier. You might need two layers. Intalls the strips inside your frame, don't use the strips as your frame.


1

1/4" birch underlayment plywood (Tecply) should take that bend even without kerfs, moisture or heat. I'd probably double or triple it (without fastening together) for stiffness. Build your form out of lumber, then either rabbet the lumber for the plywood to achieve a flush joint, or lay plywood all the way down the 2 sides adjacent to the bend.


1

In the photo there is evidence of two different concrete work. The original is the curb with the 1 x 4 projecting from it and a more recent mix just above it. There is also a visible seam line on the wall which may indicate the wall was opened for some reason. In either case the board was most likely part of the concrete form that was constructed when and if ...


1

Use a solvent degreaser for concrete floors, following manufacturer's instructions, on the oily areas. Then mop with warm water mixed with a bit of liquid laundry detergent and let it dry. If the treated area looks different due to alteration of the "waxy finish", use a hard floor wax remover on the entire floor, again follow instructions. If you wish to ...


1

This should work for your situation: http://www.quikrete.com/AtHome/Video-Thin-Repairs.asp


1

Since it is a dwelling unit, and the metal is not a roof, then you can wire it like you would any other basement. PVC would be acceptable or MC cable. 1/2" to 1" PVC needs to be supported within 3 feet of a box and every 3 feet thereafter. MC cable needs to be supported within 12 inches of a box and every 6 feet thereafter. Although this may look pretty ...


1

I did a rehab on a warehouse this way, it's the way to go. Use metal EMT conduit and pull the common single-strand THHN wire. You don't have to pull a ground wire, the conduit is the ground (plus, it's screwed or clamped to the building). Use 3/4" conduit wherever you can, it costs little more and is a lot easier to pull wires through especially ...


1

The common way of doing this is to use conduit and surface mount all boxes. The conduit provides mechanical protection (especially important for a shop) and the nice thing about this it keeps everything accessible, in case you want to add lights or a power drop for a tool or something later. Alternatively, you may also be able to use MC (armored cable) ...


1

Concrete dust becomes air-bourn when it is pulverized (due to tool use: drilling, sawing, hammering, etc.). The fine silt concrete dust is thrown into the surrounding air by electric tool motor fans or other air currents. The particulate is so small and light-weight any slight breeze will distribute it until it finally sinks and lands on a surface. Where, ...


1

You can put tile over old thinset. Make sure it not loose, vacuum to remove any debris, check for cracks, apply membrane if needed. I've done it hundreds of times for fifteen years including my own five houses. Remove the old thinset to get a flat surface for wood or laminate installation.



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