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5

The concerns I'd have -- outside of whether there's anything under the floor that could be disturbed, and whether there's a rock layer under the floor that would prevent your lowering it -- would be: You're going to have to make sure this doesn't disturb the foundation. I'd suggest getting an engineer's advice before doing anything. You're going to have to ...


3

Void spaces are frequently used for utilities, it could be accumulated condensation. Leave it be and see if more water comes out to find out if it's an active leak. I hope you did not drill through an HVAC line or drain line.


2

Concrete on its own is a porous material. It may slow water down, but will not stop it. It is possible that the outside of the wall is waterproofed, but it's not a guaranteed.


2

In my years in the construction trade, here is my synopsis of concrete floats and trowels and their uses. I will start with the screed. A screed can be as simple as a short piece of framing, 1X3 or 2X4, long enough to go from side to side of a concrete form, whether it be for a 12" thick foundation or a 3' wide side walk. For larger poured slabs the screed ...


2

Those "big wooden casts" are called "forms", by the way. Very often brick is chosen over concrete for its aesthetic value. It's also relatively easy to double-wall brick for insulation purposes, but it's extremely difficult to pour two good-quality 4"-thick concrete walls immediately adjacent to each other.


2

Consider this simplified diagram of the bottom of a house. The brick wall is part of the house; It has to carry the vertical and horizontal loads of the structure. Two story or eight stories, will look very different. But the design of the house will be independent of the soil conditions at the site. The green strip represents the footings. (They rest ...


1

Given a willingness and the ability to commit all the necessary resources, lowering the floor is entirely reasonable. Whether it makes economic sense or is even economically viable depends on the local construction and real-estate markets, the regulatory environment, and the financial, equipment and labor resources at the Owner's disposal. Viewed as a ...


1

Hydration is the chemical process by which concrete mixtures harden. Absent a retarding admixture, the hydration reaction occurs in any proper concrete mix. Wood, rotten or otherwise, is not typically a retarding admixture. Embedding rotten wood in a foundation is not consistent with good practice, industry standards, and building codes. Furthermore, ...


1

Highly recommend you dig out the rotted post, especially for a patio. Do it right the first time, going back later will be a nightmare. If you want to take the lazy way out, cut the post and bury it. Add another one directly next to it.



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