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33

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


21

The simple way to "achieve that shape" is, of course, to buy it precast, which is almost certainly what the picture is - depending on size, it's either a section of well-casing, drainage pipe, or a manhole extension. @BrownRedHawk is correct that it may (indeed, probably will) destructively deteriorate if used as direct fire containment - the interior ...


18

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


16

The item you have pictured appears to be a precast fire ring. Several companies manufacture them specifically for fire pits. Depending on pricing and availability, it might be a lot easier, and possibly even cheaper to purchase one instead of trying to create your own. Since these are specially made for the purpose of being a fire pit, the manufacturers ...


8

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


7

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


5

The metal on a wood rasp would be way to soft to make any type of dent in the concrete. The only thing you will do is destroy the rasp. You should use a roto hammer with the proper sized bit to widen the hole.


5

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


4

This may be a problem or non-problem depending on the foundation construction. You'll be much better off consulting an expert who knows how foundations are built in your area and how to diagnose them. One option is that the foundation is designed with separate large thick concrete pads that bear the load and then the space between them is filled with ...


4

It can't go over without a pump of some sort (even a siphon needs energy input to start it), so if you want a passive solution it has to go through, by installing some sort of drainage pipe through that wall. Maybe more than one. Yes, this may require disassembling and reassembling the top few courses of the wall, unless you want to try drilling through a ...


3

No this is not okay - especially for a new house. If the builder is saying it is okay, run away from this house because you have no idea what else they have screwed up. You can't put a post on a slab if it is structural (i.e. not decorative). A concrete slab is not designed (and shouldn't be) to handle structural loads like this. The concrete looks fine. ...


3

One thing that I have learned in my short life, is that when you are buying a house, always put in clauses so you can get out/get money removed from the asking price if something like this is found to be wrong. With a home inspectors and an engineers opinions, you may be able to get a sizable portion of the price of the house knocked off. Not an expert ...


3

Well, a (concrete slab) floor is just a floor, supported by its substrate. You may have some subsidence afterwards, so I'd advise my tips here, especially the one about undermining it a little to lock it all in place once you re-pour. Rebar is a must. Done right*, I have no concern for the foundation. I'd be worried that there's a pocket under the slab ...


2

If you'd like to minimize use of concrete, don't use any. I have 4 sheds that have been sitting for 14 years on sections of pressure treated wood, set on top of the ground - and a 5th that's on 4 pressure treated wood posts set into the ground. No concrete at all. Wooden floors (not pressure treated - only the ground-contact wood is PT.) Nice and dry.


2

Raise the patio surface above the brick, or lower the brick below the patio surface. If you install any type of drain system. You'll have to either slope the surface towards the drains, or install a continuous drain. Otherwise you'll have puddles.


2

Either it is a load bearing pole or someone who built the post was just practicing their pole making skills. You can remove it when you offset the load to another part of your house. Usually this would involve putting up an overhead beam and 1-2 poles to hold that. This is very specific to your house and taking out a concrete pole will definitely involve ...


1

I'd like to add another vote for "this looks bad". To proceed with buying the house, get a written report from an engineer and they use that to get it fixed, or get an allowance at closing to get it fixed. Are there other support poles that the same thing could happen to?


1

You could use a heavy duty drill and a diamond encrusted bit, such as this one They can be found on-line and in some big box stores for about $20. When grinding or cutting very hard materials like concrete, you should use a lubricant to reduce heat. Usually a small constant drip of water at the cut point helps. Images and links for illustration only, ...


1

Yes, you can and it will work. It will also dull your rasp.


1

You do not need to prime a previously painted concrete surface. The oil residue will cause adhesion problems with any surface coating, including "problem surface" primers. You need to use a detergent (or TSP) and warm water solution with a scrub brush and wash the oil residue off of the walls, then rinse clean. Then apply a high quality paint with top of the ...



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