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7

If you had an professional engineer design the whole unit as an assembly it may be possible to have the railings and metal concrete reinforcing members in the steps and risers work as a trussed span structure that was only supported at the bottom step and at the top step. This is definitely not a project for any local neighborhood handyman, general masonry ...


3

Your options are: Do nothing. A little bit of standing water on an unsealed concrete floor will seep away and vanish in a few hours to days. Use a broom or squeegee and move the water outside or to a drain. Place catch basins (if it comes from a drip above) or barriers (if it comes from the side over the floor) to prevent the water from standing on the ...


3

None. The concrete should slope away from home. If you have the option to go an inch down then fine so you don't mess up the stucco while pouring.


3

I'd like to echo that if you intend to have an unsupported cast concrete staircase, the amount, size, and placement of rebar is likely essential. This is entirely a question for an engineer. As a design alternative, you may find that using steel as the structure and adding concrete as treads may be more cost effective. If you google, I think you can ...


2

Most anchors don't come out of concrete. You have two choices. If you need to keep the look (little chipping) hit it with an angle grinder plus diamond blade. If you are putting something over these, hammer and sharp chisel works really fast.


1

Normally this is done by drilling an oversized hole, filling it with mortar and inserting a threaded anchor. The modern way to do things is to use what is called a "drop in anchor". This is an expanding anchor, kind of like a dry wall anchor. You drill the hole to size, drop in the anchor (tap it in with a hammer actually). When the bolt is screwed in, the ...


1

When you have floor drains, the installer should have established a fairly smooth slope toward those drains into the floor as part of the process of "floating" (levelling and smoothing) the surface of the concrete. This is slightly annoying but not difficult -- I've done it for summer-camp shower houses, as a mostly-untrained volunteer -- so a pro should ...


1

Yes I'm afraid concrete anchors are not appropriate for wood studs. Sleeve anchors rely on being able to press against the sides of their hole with enough pressure to counter act the pull-out weight of the load they're bearing. If the sides of the hole are somewhat squishy (like soft pine is) the anchor will probably fail. You can: Move the unit slightly ...



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