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3

Concrete does not react well with normal wood, so don't pour up along the post. That's why the little block is on top of the pier you have, its made either of pressure treated wood, or redwood. If you really want a better pier, pour one a little larger then what you have, and you can include a metal hold down or strap to make sure nothing moves later. (and ...


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Concrete slabs crack. Period. For this reason, "control joints" are often cut or tooled into slabs where aesthetics are a concern. They encourage cracks to occur along straight lines where they create less of a visual blemish and can better be accommodated by expansion joints in rigid flooring. In your case, it's not likely a concern.


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You do not want to just place the concrete tiles on native ground soil. A proper installation would be to dig out the native soil down to a solid base. Then lay in a layer of crushed rock to aid in water drainage. Directly under the concrete tiles would be some sand that makes it possible to level and even out the tile installation. With the correct ...


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Both sand and soil will not hold up long as water flows through the cracks the slabs will sink when driven over. At a minimum 3-4" of crushed quarry rock heavy compacted. Concrete under the edges to tie them together would be much better at least 2" thick in my opinion.


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I have always used bricks. A flat brick placed in cement form 25" X" will take you 18 bricks laid flat. 58 times of this will equal 60 feet each road side, so 60 x 2 x 2.25 thickness gives the following materials: 20 bags of pure Portland cement 30kg 40 bags or equivalent of 1/4 inch crush stone for the mix 42 bags of sand Ratio: Mix 1 bag Portal, 2 bags ...


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And the WINNER is................................"remove all " I have the problem of three uneven steps that need the height adjusted, the slope of the first step outside the threshold, and extend the three of them. The absolute simplest, after extensively pursuing this research is: The more cures the higher the risk. Tear everything out. Worth the work for ...


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Cut slots in the concrete close together with an angle grinder and diamond blade, knock off the little ridges you have just created, and then either flatten with a cup grinder or level up with compound.


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Beams rarely follow curves in cases like this. Put a standard beam at the height of the zenith and frame down to shape the arch, thereby creating the proper rough openings for the windows. Install the center post under the beam.


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I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At ...


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For 20 square feet of concrete I would simply saw it off the adjacent patio if the strip is not a separate pour and then break out the strip with a jack hammer. Haul that away and then re-prep the base for new concrete. In the case of the tree roots just chop them out of the way. This will give you the cleanest solution with the longest life. Trying to ...


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In your shoes, I'd do this: Trench out along the concrete strip to give yourself access to the soil under the raised portions of the strip. Make the trench 6-8" below the bottom of the concrete and wide enough to work in. Determine whether there's remaining root under the concrete. If so, dig and chop it out completely. Using a water hose, begin ...


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It doesn't look to me like the slab has shifted, since the crack appears level and isn't terribly wide. I would contact a concrete contractor, one that specializes in repairs, if there is erosion under the slab they can usually pump a slurry under it to fill in the void. Is your garage floor "Floating"? Look around the edges, if the floor goes under the ...


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It's a process, not a "special" material. A good steel trowel job can give a glass-like finish on standard concrete. It's partly technique, and partly timing (or timing is part of the technique.) Troweling knocks down larger particles and brings up smaller ones, resulting in a smooth finish. In many places it's too smooth, IMHO - easy to sweep, but also easy ...


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If you want to get a smooth finish after-the-fact, there are some great products out there that will set smooth and very thin - a real 'feather edge'. I recently used Henry FeatherFinish Patch and Skimcoat to prep a rough and uneven concrete floor before laying luxury vinyl tile and was really pleased with the results. Once mixed, it spreads like butter with ...


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If you live in an earthquake zone, it may already have a feature to prevent that, such as a central steel pin. In any case, slap-dash "reinforcing" can have effects opposite what you expect (could be your new system would break the post where it entered the concrete by concentrating forces there) - and the rot issue was already pointed out by #2448131 I ...


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First I want to point out that the hardness has a lot to do with cure time and temperature. Longer cures (6-8 weeks) at cool temperature (say 50 °F) are harder. Short, hot cures are harder initially, and crumble later. Generally, the 1pt cement : 2pt sand ratio is best and will have a 3500 psi compression stress. A 1:3 ratio will have less than 3000 psi. ...


1

A rotary hammer is the standard tool for a job like this, with a carbide-tipped masonry bit. You can rent a heavy-duty model at your local rental center. They're not difficult to use. Be sure to wear ear, eye, and resipration protection. As for your question about depth, you haven't provided nearly enough information about your plans for anyone to ...


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If you don't have to make the overlay "very thin" and the patio is structurally sound, there's not a whole lot of "bonding" needed - a 1-1/2 - 2" thick overlay on a sound, solid concrete substrate will happily sit there, unless it has voids to encourage spalling (by filling with water and freezing) in the winter. As it happens, that looks like a pretty good ...


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You definitely want to leave an expansion gap. However, you can fill the seam using a flexible material. Foam rod covered with a seam filler, is one common solution. There are also products sold that can simply be pushed into the seam. Check your local hardware/home improvement store, to see what's available in your area.


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From the description, I suggest renting a proper concrete grinder (bottom of the page) from your local rental shop or big box. This will allow finer control and result in a flatter, smoother surface than if you attempted to use abrasive or diamond-bitted handheld power tools. If you'd rather not go that far, an angle grinder with an appropriate disk would ...


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If there isn't a lot of seasonal movement, it won't matter. I'd layer a small amount of sand as a pad and leveler (plus landscape fabric to control weed growth if you like) and go with whatever looks nice to you. If things do move a fair bit, smaller pavers will handle it better and be less likely to break over time.


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Hairline cracks are not a problem. If they get to 1/4" at any point, then you probably need to have an engineer give it a look over. However, not sure if radon gas is a problem in your area, but cracks in the basement will let radon gas seep in, so it would be worth your time and the money to purchase a radon gas detector. You could probably call your ...


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Welcome to crap construction in the 21st century, where nobody gets basements, just footings, and those that do get basements get 4" slabs on sand often above the frost line. Whether water comes in is a function of the water table in your area and whether you have proper drainage on your property. There is nothing you can do except install a sump pump. ...



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