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7

This is a reasonable concern, but not necessarily a problem. It is not uncommon to have concrete forms the way you describe. The solution depends largely on the consistency of the concrete mix. A very wet mix will run all over the place, a very dry mix will hardly flow out the end at all. This property is known as the "slump" of concrete, measured in inches. ...


5

This sounds like old school plaster on metal mesh, common for that era in apartments and condos. Hard as a rock. However, you'd have to open up the wall to find the concrete block that's most likely behind it, because the plaster is only supported by furring strips tacked into the blocks with nails. Do not be fooled if your stud-finder scores a hit. Don't be ...


2

It's either a continuous pour or it's not. Whether you have to 'bond' (use rebar/scarify) depends on the thickness of the new pour, the existing substrate and the expected conditions it will be subjected to. Excerpt from Bonded or Not, a discussion on pavement restoration using concrete overlays, by William D. Palmer Jr.: (concreteconstruction.net) ...


2

X-ray? Sure they do this often in commercial buildings but it's probably well outside of something that is cost effective in a house. A metal detector would locate the rebar and a tone generator could be used on a wire in the conduit in order to locate it.


2

I know this post is from a couple of years ago. I'm not sure how your project ended up, but if you did end up using mortar, you can still change the color if needed. We had our chimney repaired and the new mortar color did not match the old mortar color. We found a product online called Instant Mortar Match. The website is InstantMortarMatch.com. We ...


1

Assuming there is no toilet above, all the waste going through these pipes should be water only (maybe a bit of hair in the sink). If so, you may be able to plug the leak with a solid rod that fits the hole. The water should run easily around it. You need to figure out if there is one hole in the pipe or two (did you punch through upstairs? Even if not, ...


1

Acquire a rotatory impact hammer drill so that you can pocket rebar into the existing concrete. Buy 'high-strength' expensive concrete. If you called a truck for onsite mixing (an unnecessary expense), tell the driver, 7 bag mix. An alternative to rebar, for such a small patch, is to use long masonry screws, left standing proud to provide an anchor. E.g., ...


1

Sometimes hiring pros is the best option. There are various approaches to the problem. You can set screed guides/rails that you first use to get it flat, then pull and fill in the void they leave. Some are designed to be left in place as expansion joints. You can use a dense foam insulation around the edge of the slab and use that to guide your screeding. ...


1

Concrete does not have very good tensile strength. Rebar is laid in such a manner that it adds tensile strength in the concrete. Depending on the size and weight load the pier/footer assembly is expected to support and the length of the pier, it could be reinforced in the following manner. A rebar circle in the footer to prevent weight spread from ...


1

I'm not sure what your level of expertise is, but it's important to note that footings and piers are two different things (no offense intended). Usually for a deck piers will suffice on their own, provided they are wide enough (typically 12" is good) and deep enough to go below the frostline in your area (3 ft deep is a good rule of thumb). The main ...


1

Even when swept clean I would not consider that a properly prepared surface for a threshold. Just the nature of the uneven surface of those filled concrete blocks would make water tend to collect underneath. You should use a concrete patch/resurfacer to create a smooth level (or slightly sloped away from the opening) surface, then attach the threshold per ...


1

You want to attach the ledger to the edge of a concrete pad? Sounds like a terrible idea to me. It's possible that an engineer could have designed a way to carry the load through the pad and into the ground, but that would have to have been done before pouring the pad. Attaching the ledger to an existing pad, will almost certainly crack, split, or ...


1

Lacking a specific brand from your question, I went and looked at http://www.screwfix.com/p/mapei-ultraplan-self-levelling-compound-grey-25kg/4959f Which states that it will cover (mixed) 6 square meters at 3mm thick. I make that 100cm x 600 cm x 0.3 cm or 18,000 cubic centimeters. Last I checked, 1000 CCs was a liter, so you have 6 liters of free space. ...


1

Leveling using mortar is not acceptable in so many ways, but most important one is that it would crack. Even if it doesn't crack (and it will) you will have a problem because it is workshop: every time you drop a hammer or something you will damage the floor. Self-leveling compound is the best solution, by far but if that is not the option than I suggest one ...


1

I don't live on the beach, but we do live in a desert where the soil is essentially sand. I remember when we were having our house built, like everyone else has alluded to, we had to have the foundation dug very deep to where the soil was actually compacted and poured the foundation from there. The best place to find out about the mixture for your area ...


1

I know that your question is a couple of years old, but I thought I'd post an answer in case you haven't figured out a solution yet. We had a chimney on our house that had been repaired. The new mortar did not end up being the same color as the old mortar that was used. We found a product online called Instant Mortar Match. The website is ...



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