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You have got your work cut out for you if you plan to do this by hand. I really would have you consider renting or hiring a backhoe or mini excavator to do this. If you feel you really need to do this by hand, you will need to get at the minimum, an electric demolition hammer, at the most an air compressor and jack hammer. Break the concrete down about 6 to ...


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If they had a 32' play structure resting on top of them and they had 6" U brackets I'm guessing the footings are at least a foot in diameter? Maybe more? Keep in mind that even if you could dig the entire thing out of the ground it's going to weigh hundreds of pounds. Unless you have some heavy equipment to pull them out you're going to have some trouble ...


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Depends on where the natural water table is and how much pressure it can put on the pool (which is a function of the porosity of the earth immediately surrounding the pool). If you know the bottom is above the water table you can leave it empty until the ground freezes. Otherwise you're counting on the water table level and surrounding soil to not exceed ...


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Unless the existing window is leaking, the sole criterion for judging better and worse options in this case is the likelihood of future bulk water infiltration. The current installation is performing functionally and aesthetically as part of the building envelope. Breaching and patching the envelope is not a repair, and at best will only perform equally ...


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There's no problem per-se with covering it up. However, with a windows there's lots of chances there for leaks. And since you can't see the window from the outside and it will be behind a wall inside, you probably won't be able to see any evidence of damage or leaks until it's too late and caused significant damage to your new walls and flooring. Based on ...


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Would this work? Or is this too close to other buildings?


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Hi I had the same issue and some similar thoughts. I tried the drilling out process with and extended drill spade bit, But could not drill all of the post out. In the end I was able to remove all of the remainder by driving a stainless steel tube down the hole cutting the rotten post out a chunk at a time. Then sliding another smaller tube down the middle of ...


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Unless you have a particular reason to think your garage is sinking into the ground, I wouldn't worry about this much weight. Presumably the existing asphalt floor can support the weight of a car, which has more than 500 lbs of weight per tire (concentrated on a much smaller contact area than your safe). Besides, what's the worst that could happen? If in a ...


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Base on your description: Concrete strength does not appear to be an issue. With a minimal 2500 psi concrete the entire safe could bear on one square inch. The size of the footing depends on the bearing capacity of the soil. Suppose the soil has a bearing capacity of 20 pounds per square foot. Then the foundation would need to be 25 square feet. Other soil ...


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Unfortunately, your real problem here actually isn't that you have cracks in the cement; it's that your cement has developed several cracks in 2 days. They are a symptom indicating that the cement is weak (typically because it was not mixed correctly; most often, it's too wet). Nothing you do to repair the cracks will fix that weakness. The right thing to ...


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Treat it like you would ammunition. If there's no corrosion, they're probably fine. If you start using it and you get misfires, dispose of it.


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While their power may be degraded, using them is not likely to be dangerous. The barrel of the nail gun is what really contains the blast.


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You should be able (with a cheap metal-drilling bit you don't love much) to drill those out and try again. Drill them out, use a correctly-sized masonry bit to drill the holes larger, vacuum all the dust out of the holes, and set new anchors. Perhaps set the anchors a bit deeper to compensate for the slight spalling at the surface here. You can use ...


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The concrete looks fine, other than a little surface damage (and obviously the holes themselves). I would drill them out, then fill the holes and damaged area with hydraulic cement. Make sure you use the drill bit specified by the anchor manufacturer next time. These shouldn't be that difficult to insert into holes.


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Use wood to cover the end of the gap, mix cement and pour it in.



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