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No. Those holders give virtually no torsional support. Your gate will tear it right down. Plan on robust posts in a substantial concrete footing to carry that torque load. Either that and do what I did and run some snow fence on a pair of 1/4" vinyl-coated cable. The gate won't contain a toddler, and the snow fence wouldn't either, but it gives a visual ...


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Assuming that this is a new 4 inches of floor on a ground level structure... No this is definitely not ok. Greenboard is mold resistant. It is, however, still just gypsum with paper over it. Neither is using pressure treated wood as a barrier. Why? Concrete wicks water. Any water near the area will be distributed to be brought into direct contact with ...


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CLR is what you're looking for. I had a similar problem as you (I was cutting metal on my driveway and did not sweep up the fines that night...Rusted the next day!) and it worked like a charm. It comes in a grey bottle with a multicoloured label. Dilute using the measurements on the bottle, and scrub hard with a stiff bristled broom. Rinse well. This ...


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I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...


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There are two primary types of anchors for concrete. I'd trust either if properly installed. Holes must be drilled cleanly and to the proper size. Bolts must be of the correct diameter and length. Both require fairly large holes (7/16" to 5/8" or so). Sleeve or Wedge Anchor (with integrated bolt) Lag Shield (with standard lag screw)


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The 4" to concrete figure you see is a minimum clearance value, and really has nothing to do with the size of the footing required to support a load or prevent twisting or uplift. The size(volume) of the footing is what your engineer calculates out to have adequate mass to support/hold down your structure. One thing I noticed on the spec sheet you linked to:...


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For anyone in the future, in most areas with not insignificant snowfall this is not code. Upwards of 6" of clearance above ground level (grade) is required to minimize moisture rot, specifically, after the buildup beam (min 5.5"), joist structure (min 3.5"), and boards (min 1") and variance (~.5"). Your deck will fall at a minimum of 16.5" from grade (the ...


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You can always drill into the concrete (behind the foam) and use a 4 or 5" concrete screw (Tapcon). Should be good for 300 lbs per 1/4" screw. Don't hit any wires or pipes burried in the foam



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