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You guys are all nuts you dont make sense. I have the same box im putting in my shed. I have a problem with my 200 amp main breaker. Its real old it needs to be changed. Im not paying the electric company 450 dollars to turn it off and on i go in the box live. Just email me back a 200 amp 25 year old box the grounds and neutrals Are on both sides of the box ...


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You run a hundred feet or two hundred feet. Most main 200 amp service is the neutral and grounds are all together. gfci work as long on a 110 you run three wires in seperate bar screws. And it does not matter if your grounds and neturals are tied together. All houses are grounded to code. Running two one ten breakers makes double pole makes it 220 because ...


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I can't answer whether it complies with code or not since that depends on where you are, but I doubt it would matter. It's compressed some, but the volume is the same; it's just a different shape, and only slightly at that. Codes regarding airflow (and water flow) issues are mostly concerned with turns. A 90 degree angle will limit airflow whereas a larger ...


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Codes are usually minimum safety standards. However, in the vernacular, "code" is a loose term that includes national, state, county and local laws and ordinances that dictate or direct building practices of all kinds. The whim of the inspectors could also loosely be considered "code". Most of the time, the basis of these laws and whims are guided by or ...


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An opening under the building code would typically be a door or a window. If you have a gas leak, the dryer vent nearby doesn't significantly increase the hazard of the gas leak, because the hazard of a gas leak is massive. On the other hand, blowing hot moist air on a piece of equipment is more likely to create maintenance issues and routing a new ...


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galvanized will work fine for a long, long time. Yes, in time (40-60 years) you may get enough corrosion to affect water flow, but by that time, you or someone else will have changed out the trim 3-4 times.


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This is one single branch circuit, and a very common wiring method. I've highlighted the ungrounded (hot) conductors in your image, to help you understand what's going on. The wires highlighted in red, represent the feed coming to the box from the panel. These wires are split, so as to provide power to both switches. If you were to measure between any of ...


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That isn't three circuits, it's only two. The Romex on the left is the power coming in from your distribution box, and the other two are your two loads. Each switch is connected between the incoming power and one of the loads. I'm not sure why there are so many wirenuts on the supply side — it seems that if one wirenut can connect three wires, then ...


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The switch location is not an outlet according to NEC, unless you're installing a switch/ receptacle combo device. Outlet. A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment. I doubt an inspector would require the circuit to be AFCI protected, but ultimately that's who'll make the final decision. To be sure, contact ...



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