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Most current US building codes require filling all holes that penetrate floors with fireblock foam. Building inspectors routinely look for it. The purpose is to slow down the spread of fire from floor to floor, similar to the firebreak blocking required in many jurisdictions in every stud bay in framed walls. This would preclude leaving pull holes and ...


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If you don't run conduit, you won't be able to pull wires with a pull string going through holes in studs anyway. So you might as well firestop them (or run conduit and firestop around the outside of it.)


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Pardon my wordiness below – I just wanted to be as clear as possible, and hope some of it will be useful. I have not searched the NEC re. crimp/solderless connectors so I will not address that question. As someone who also has a strong preference for stranded wire, however, I will offer some suggestions that might alleviate some compliance concerns – based ...


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Generally, law questions are off-topic, so I'll answer in a way that's broadly applicable. For the most part, building components that are no longer code-compliant are grandfathered in until work needs to be done on them. So if you have a section of galvanized pipe that's rusted or clogged, you'll have to replace that section with copper or something else ...


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Not only is sheetrock required to protect NM-type wiring from physical damage, the sheetrock itself is the primary source of fire resistance in a light-frame (wood or steel stud) wall -- without it, fire can directly get into the structural members and mess them up in a hurry! So get that drywall replaced ASAP.


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Generally fire code will require that any exposed wiring (not run through metal conduit) be behind sheet rock or some other wall board. I would imagine the same is true for plumbing. The logic here is that you can't pull, bump or otherwise disrupt wires and pipes if they are behind a wall. I don't know the particulars of code in MSP BUT I can't imagine ...


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If there is nothing in the code of practice which specifies a limit to the number of holes, then there is no limit to the number of holes. From an engineering standpoint, this is because a beam with holes in it can act like a truss (see e.g. the bailey truss). The minimum hole sizes and minimum spacing is to allow enough timber to act as the ...


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According to the National Electrical Code, a gas furnace (or any other central heating equipment) must be on its own circuit. So connecting a water heater (or anything else), would be a code violation. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 4 Equipment for General Use Article 422 Appliances 422.12 Central Heating Equipment. Central heating ...


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You do not need water proofing in between the ledger and the rim joist, but the joint needs protected some how. Flashing, roofing membrane, etc. And what ever it is needs to go under the siding and over the ledger in a continuous fashion with no seams at the ledger. Tar paper is not enough. Metal, EPDM, etc is what is needed.


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A 20 amp receptacle and a 15 are the same aside from the face. It is the appliance itself which determines the draw. 20 amp plugs have the side slot to prevent attempting to power a 20amp device with a 15 amp service, under powering the device and overdrawing on the circuit. Most new microwaves and MW/good fans combos require a 20 amp circuit but come with ...


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You guys are all nuts you dont make sense. I have the same box im putting in my shed. I have a problem with my 200 amp main breaker. Its real old it needs to be changed. Im not paying the electric company 450 dollars to turn it off and on i go in the box live. Just email me back a 200 amp 25 year old box the grounds and neutrals Are on both sides of the box ...


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You run a hundred feet or two hundred feet. Most main 200 amp service is the neutral and grounds are all together. gfci work as long on a 110 you run three wires in seperate bar screws. And it does not matter if your grounds and neturals are tied together. All houses are grounded to code. Running two one ten breakers makes double pole makes it 220 because ...


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I can't answer whether it complies with code or not since that depends on where you are, but I doubt it would matter. It's compressed some, but the volume is the same; it's just a different shape, and only slightly at that. Codes regarding airflow (and water flow) issues are mostly concerned with turns. A 90 degree angle will limit airflow whereas a larger ...


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Codes are usually minimum safety standards. However, in the vernacular, "code" is a loose term that includes national, state, county and local laws and ordinances that dictate or direct building practices of all kinds. The whim of the inspectors could also loosely be considered "code". Most of the time, the basis of these laws and whims are guided by or ...


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An opening under the building code would typically be a door or a window. If you have a gas leak, the dryer vent nearby doesn't significantly increase the hazard of the gas leak, because the hazard of a gas leak is massive. On the other hand, blowing hot moist air on a piece of equipment is more likely to create maintenance issues and routing a new ...



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