New answers tagged

1

While there is no rule that says a switched receptacle provided under 210.70(A)(1) Exception 1 must be used for lighting loads -- and the exception in 404.2(C)(7) does not exclude the switched receptacle outlets that are provided under 210.70(A)(1) Exception 1 -- I would consider it good practice to provision a neutral at the switch for a switched receptacle ...


3

Code is a guide for localities to establish rules. As such, if a locale adopts the code as is, it will be up to them to enforce their rules. Now we are down to the inspector's decision as to whether you comply. Since the switched outlet is serving functionally as a luminaire, many inspectors would probably take the view that luminaire switches need a ...


0

I read that with the same surprise that you do: a grounded conductor (neutral) is not required at a switch that controls a receptacle.


2

Doing this right now. Simple 50 amp sub feed to a shed. Two hots (ungrounded conductor), one neutral (grounded conductor), one ground (equipment grounding conductor) in 1" pvc. Ground rod at the shed. Simple, that's how you do it.


0

I see this is a real old thread but I'll chime in to see if it helps clear other people's minds as they Google search this question. I think people over think it. A 15 amp plug has two vertical blades, 20 amp plug has 1 vertical and 1 horizontal. The different configurations are so you don't accidentally plug a piece of equipment that draws 20 amps into a 15 ...


-2

Putting two breakers of same size and rating in series can be dangerous. manufacturers give the short circuit breaking current for ONE device. Modern CB operated with the magnetic force generated during the short circuit. This magnetic repulsion of the contacts is linked to the energy generated during the short circuit. The breakers are designed to open ...


2

You can run the fridge but not the dishwasher as shown in exhibit 210.28. It also depends on where you live local code may have exemptions or tougher requirements. I usually run a dedicated circuit for the fridge. There is an exception that allows a gas stove igniter and a clock outlet on the 2 small appliance circuit. The wording is counter top a ...


0

Edit- Based on comments above tape cannot be used (alone) for creating a splice. As Tester101 pointed out if the splice was soldered or crimped or joined with some (UL approved) device, then tape may be used for insulating the splice. With regard to splices made with connectors, the method below could be used for insulating the connector (of specifically, ...


0

Yes. It's legal. I'm not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. I think you're talking about positioning portable furniture (not really portable, but you know what I mean). If the loftbed is permanent construction, you'd have to look a little harder at this. Even in that case, I suspect you'd be fine. Because this sounds to be a dry standpipe for fire ...


0

This is an old thread, but I think people have missed the point. 15 amp receptacles are designed for use on 20 amp circuits, but 20 amp receptacles are not designed for use on 15 amp circuits. In other words, the 15 amp rating ALLOWS the outlet to be used on a 15 amp circuit. The 20 amp rating PROHIBITS the outlet from being used on a 15 amp circuit. Either ...


1

Perhaps I could be wrong on this but when I worked as an electrician in California many years ago, the coast 3 way switching was developed for the following reason. Many homes and offices were wired using steel flex (aluminum came later). Most cities in California at that time had their own electrical code, governed to some degree by the state code and NEC. ...


4

Your problem is that you have looped/paralleled the neutral (white) wire both through and around the 3-way switches, which can be interpreted as a NEC 300.3(B)/310.10(H) violation. What I would do instead is run a 14/4 between the two 3-way switches, with black as the unswitched hot and red and blue as the travelers, then run a 14/3 from the 2nd switch box ...


2

It seems like the space under the cabinets is inaccessible and would be treated like the interior of a wall. In that case, you could merely cut a hole in the wall at the back bottom of the cabinet that will hold the heater and continue your cabling into the opening that will hold the heater. Once the cable is attached to the heater and the heater is ...


2

This could be a tricky one, as it depends on what you consider an "appliance", and how you define "dedicated space". National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 4 Equipment for General Use Article 406 Receptacles, Cord Connectors, and Attachment Plugs (Caps) 406.12 Tamper Resistant Receptacles. (A) Dwelling Units. In all areas specified in ...


1

Where do you live? In Oregon non tamper outlets and non GFCI's are allowed behind an appliance not easily moved. in section 100 of the NEC an appliance is utilization equipment, generally other than industrial, that is normally built in standard shapes or sizes or types and is installed or connected to preform one or more functions. It gives some ...


10

The use of these devices is limited to specific situations, which are described in 334.40(B) of the National Electrical Code. The 2011 version of the code had this to say. National Electrical Code 2011 334.40(B) Devices of Insulating Materials. Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in ...



Top 50 recent answers are included