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0

If I understand your question correctly - let me verify that first. You have one switch controlling two outlets. You want to add a ceiling fan. It's not quite clear whether your ceiling fan is to also be controlled by the switch, but at this point that's pretty moot. You currently have 14-2 supplying power to the first outlet box, where it breaks out into ...


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If you are adding a new ceiling fan with a light and currently only have switched outlets in that room ( I am assuming that you are installing a fan rated box properly supported in the ceiling) the outlets no longer need to be switched. At the outlet in your drawing you can remove the color markings from the White in the switch loop and re connect them white ...


0

You need to identify each pair of hot wires with there corisponding neutral first try starting at the romex sheath in the panel with the power to the panel OFF and follow each to there termination and label them. And relocate breakers as necessary. If this is not possible it is much more difficult .If you can find the first box that each MWBS is run to you ...


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The easy way to tell if an outlet is powered by an MWBC is to turn off the breaker(s) known to supply power to that MWBC and see if the outlet's power goes away. The US National Fire Protection Agency's National Electrical Code does specify that all nongrounded conductors in an MWBCs must be controlled by a double-pole breaker or marked pair of linked ...


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IRC only requires 1/2" gyp. brd. for garage walls except when there is a living space above the garage. When a living space exists above the garage then 5/8" type X gyp. brd. must be used on the ceiling.


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I agree that emt is the way to go if corrosion is a big concern you can use straps that stand the conduit off of the wall with a plastic washer between the wall and strap or a non metalic strap that does the same. Personally I would use metal as opposed to pvc because if a fire did occur pvc produces poisonous smoke. I think this may be one of the reasons it ...


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I haven't found anything in the 2014 NEC that would make push-in connectors illegal to use as long as the manufacturer's instructions are followed and the ones used are UL listed for the application. But as always the NEC is a minimum standard that gives the AHJ (authority having jurisdiction) the ability to make requirements over and above the guidelines in ...


-1

California has not decided to regulate and tax toilet height yet but its only a matter of time. What they do regulate is gallons per flush. Assembly Bill 715 says that as of Jan. 1st 2014 it is illegal for manufacturers to sell toilets that exceed 1.28 GPF in California. This, along with the 14" rough-in requirement, is limiting your selection, in fact: ...


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There are still toilets with bowl heights of 14.5 - 15.5". It seems as though Kohler (among others), like to advertise their "Comfort heightâ„¢" toilets. However, they do offer toilets in all height ranges. Standard height: 14 1/2" - 15 1/2" "Comfort height": 16" - 17" ADA Compliant: 17" - 19"


6

The meters shouldn't interfere with each other. They're just ammeters, after all; current is current. You will be charged for the parasitic load your new meter introduces, of course, which may vex your test. Bigger problem is that you'll need the electric company's cooperation to turn off your circuit so you can rewire—and they are almost certainly ...


-3

The instructions for the push in connectors I have seen disallow their use with aluminum wire. This makes sense because push in (stab in connections) have always been against code. I have done rework in a house where the make up was done using these type of connectors. It seems to make for a neat installation. I did not see any failures. This house is about ...


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Plumbing code allows this. Styles are not covered under building codes, generally safety and quality are what building codes are after.


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Plumbing code is generally unconcerned with the style of whatever fixture you choose to install, only that the fixture work properly and be installed properly.


2

Standard bathroom faucets come in versions that have the faucet handles on 4" centers, 8" centers, or separate pieces that can be placed at any distance apart. I have never heard of a jurisdiction whose building codes require a specific distance for handle centers. But to be certain, check with the local plumber who will be installing the fixture.


3

The electrical ground to the water pipe is required and not a hack. It is supposed to be connected as close to the supply side as practical, preferably upstream of any cutoff valves. There should also be an electrical ground connection to your gas line if any of the gas lines inside the house are conductive, like black pipe. When I set out to install the ...


2

There is no electric code prohibiting this, and I don't think there's any gas codes on this either. Main thing is to be 100% certain you are clear of any buried lines/pipes.


0

It is fine to drill a hole in pavement to drive the rod. How do you attach clamps and wire if it is driven flush? My city inspector wanted to be able to see the manufacturer's stampings on the end of the rod to prove that I had not cut it off short (providing less than required soil contact), I was specifically required to leave several inches exposed.


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There is no reason to provide accessibility to a supplementary grounding electrode and the code requires it to be at or below surface. The important point of the code is that the supplementary electrode be driven so that it has at least 8' of full contact with the ground. Excavating and backfilling are likely to reduce the effective contact.


1

As a highly-regulated hobby, pretty much everything about DIY remodeling requires a permit. This is generally more true the more structural the project and the bluer the state you live in. However, among DIYers, permit requirements are commonly ignored with no consequences, usually because nobody can see you doing the work. However, common sense dictates ...


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At the point where someone wonders, "Is a building permit required?" the answer is usually, Yes. The only definitive answer will come from the local building department.


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Location specific advice is generally considered off topic as per the [faq] but, that said... Pretty much anything you do to a building "requires" a permit. Whether or not you actually GET one is a different question, but a blanket "yes, probably" applies here. But that said - a permit only applies to the work being done. If you get a permit for a new ...



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