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As a highly-regulated hobby, pretty much everything about DIY remodeling requires a permit. This is generally more true the more structural the project and the bluer the state you live in. However, among DIYers, permit requirements are commonly ignored with no consequences, usually because nobody can see you doing the work. However, common sense dictates ...


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At the point where someone wonders, "Is a building permit required?" the answer is usually, Yes. The only definitive answer will come from the local building department.


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Location specific advice is generally considered off topic as per the [faq] but, that said... Pretty much anything you do to a building "requires" a permit. Whether or not you actually GET one is a different question, but a blanket "yes, probably" applies here. But that said - a permit only applies to the work being done. If you get a permit for a new ...


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The reference to a switch loop in the related question describes a pair of wires that are both hot or live. The white wire is serving as a black and should have a black marking or tape on it. The switch is serving as a break in the hot line. Every operating device (like a fan or lamp) in standard wiring needs a hot line and a neutral line, and usually a ...


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Taller bathroom vanities are typically advertised as "comfort height". My 5'6" wife strongly agrees that the 36" counters are far more comfortable. Few people complain about kitchen counters being too tall, so I don't know why there's so much concern that they'll be unusable in bathrooms. For small children.. they're not going to be small forever. Get a ...


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Key-in-Knob sets are common because they're cheap and easy to throw into a door, and they save the contractors the hassle of installing a deadbolt. That does not mean they're mandatory. Even where self-locking doors are needed, there are multiple ways to achieve that, many of which are more secure than the typical KIK set. The downside of not having the ...


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Some jurisdictions, such as New York City, require self-closing, self-locking doors to the entry of multiple family dwellings (,8 or more units), but do not seem to require them on smaller housing units (such as one or two family homes) or on the individual apartments within a larger unit. Even when locks are required, they do not need to be in the knob of ...


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As others have said, what is involved depends on the jurisdiction. Many homes were built before there were building or electrical codes. Many never got a certificate of occupancy. Most buyers (and their banks and insurers) now require a C of O or its equivalent before a sale. However, most jurisdictions recognize that it is generally not practical or ...


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Only the office that told you you need the CofO can tell you what it involves. First off, what happened to the original CofO? They don't just expire. Whatever caused the CofO to be open is what you need to have inspected. You CANNOT just have an 80 year old house inspected like it was new. Depending on your area the building department can tell you who ...



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