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2

Pull out the wire that's in conduit, (look it over, but it's probably just fine) pull in that wire and a ground. It's darn near impossible to pull in another wire without pulling the whole bundle out and back in. It's fairly straightforward to pull the whole bundle out, add a wire and pull back in, unless the conduit is too small. Code-wise, (250.118) ...


2

I'd drop in a sub-panel and run circuits from there. Overload would blow the sub-panel breaker. Unlikely that a shop and dryer would be used simultaneously causing an overload. Same thinking using a dryer circuit to charge an EV.


1

There are a few concerns: Neutral and Grounding First and foremost to do any of this would require a neutral conductor and a non current carrying conductor known as a ground/earth. Undersized Grounding Most double pole branch circuit grounds are only sized at #10. This is only good for up to 60 Amps according to the NEC. The total Amps gained with the ...


1

The code doesn't care if you say you're not going to use stuff at the same time, it assumes you will. I don't think it would be a code violation to have multiple outlets on a 240 volt circuit (though I could be wrong). The number of outlets is not restricted (at least not that I've seen), based on voltage. However, the conductors have to be sized for ...


5

For an 8.5' span I'd say no. The purpose of the jack studs isn't just to hold up the header - it also helps distribute the load more evenly to the foundation. For that wide of a span the IRC calls for 2 jacks(see R502.5 Allowable girder spans).


0

I don't know about code requirements, but what I have seen done with disconnected electrical wiring abandoned in the wall is: Disconnect and remove from the electrical panel. Label it. At the other end where the baseboards were, connect the hot and neutral with a wie nut, tape it on, and shove it in the wall. Shorting it like that prevents someone from ...


0

The code is more concerned with wires you can access and remove. A good example would be a drop ceiling grid. In your case if you do not have that ability then yes just snipping off the wires will suffice. As an extra precaution stager the cut ends and tape off the ends with electrical tape. Then remove them completely from the panel as to prevent any ...


0

There should be no problem running 4 ceiling fans on a single 15 ampere circuit, though it will depend on what else is on the circuit. Say a 52" fan is 90-100 watts (at high speed), plus three 60 watt bulbs. That puts each fixture at 280 watts or so. Which means four of them, would be 1120 watts. A 120 volt 15 ampere circuit, can supply 1880 watts (120 ...


1

Any plastic type back boxes should be lined on the external side with fire resisting material. A fire resisting putty is available for metal back boxes you should not use open back boxes in fire walls. seal the open end of conduits with FR putty


3

NEC Article 362 I've copied the NEC portions that cover corrugated HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) conduit for your reading pleasure. The NEC differentiates between corrugated and non corrugated HDPE conduits by referring to corrugated HDPE as ENT and non corrugated as just HDPE. Non corrugated HDPE is not allowed at all in any buildings, whereas ...


2

It is okay to drill from below as long as you know, for a fact that you are not going to hit ANYTHING, otherwise go into the attic. The conduit can run on the floor of the attic but I would use a two hole strap and get it above the insulation . I would use a plastic pull box with a plastic cover, the backless may not give you the support that you need when ...


2

I'm not a fire expert, but I doubt fire will actually spread through the conduit. Toxic fumes, sure, but not fire (unless the conduit is really short). Flames will, however, quickly jump through a hole in a 1 1/2" - 3" thick barrier. If you really want to take fireblocking to the extreme, you could seal the ends of the conduit around the cables with ...



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