New answers tagged

1

It depends on your building/fire code jurisdiction, some do and some do not. More importantly, if the garage is a separately occupied dwelling it should be isolated from the other apartment via fire-resistant materials. This presumption (which is almost always a part of the local building code) is what alleviates the need for an interconnected alarm in the ...


1

I try to replace galvanized when ever possible. I've noticed in tub/shower installs water eventually tends to come out discolored due to rusting of the galvanized piping. Also, I've found that galvanized, when installed in direct contact to copper or brass tends to rust quicker and I've been told by at least 2 different plumbers that it is because of the ...


4

TL;DR -- find the breaker that shuts that red wire off, then slap the builder with it, so to speak The builder of your house needs a slap with the NEC. There are two very clear Code violations here, and they're both things that are trivial to avoid. First off, the lack of panel labeling isn't just a massive inconvenience to you, it's against Code -- the ...


3

Windows above 72 inches from exterior grade are required to have a sill at least 24 inches off the floor to meet 2012 IRC requirements, which should be what you're required to comply with (IRC at least, it might not be 2012 but AFAIK it's been 24 inches for years). If you can limit the windows from opening more than 4 inches, or use a "Window Opening Control ...


12

In the cases where I've run I to something like this, the hotel originally had open walkways around the rooms -- allowing more light in, and probably cheaper to build -- which were later closed off with an outside wall to provide a sheltered approach to the rooms and to reduce energy needed to heat or cool the rooms. The windows were left in place because ...


6

First of all, building codes covering private residences are typically not the same as larger commercial buildings. In the USA those are often the IRC and IBC, respectively (although each state has their own versions and amendments). But to the issue you asked about: were the windows into the hallway operable? Hotel windows are usually inoperable and are ...


0

I have no idea what you are talking about. I get both coated and standard from big blue and little orange. They don't carry a ton of different ones at the store because why would they? They are really heavy, hard to stock, the boxes break all the time (ones with a lot in there because you know you want thing cardboard for nails naturally), and there ...


1

Most building authorities will insist that all framing connections are joined so that there is no space between them. Most carpenters will follow this idea as a matter of principle. When metal framing connectors are used the joists should abut the metal plate in the same way; as close to the inside of the connector as possible with no space.


2

Short answer: No Here's the quote you had: that are present at each building or structure served shall be bonded together to form the grounding electrode system Notice it says at each building not between buildings. It should finish that sentence with "for that building". So, if you have a lightning protection system and the required grounding ...


2

Since there is still some uncertainty here, I took a minute to create an image that might fix some of this. Lightning is a DC shot of electricity going to the ground, it's source. So it's easiest to consider it that way. Next, lightning is so powerful that it creates a surrounding zone of energy on any conductive material that is able, the yellow circles. ...


1

Yes, they should be connected so that the power has a set path back to the source. Rods in the ground are there for a direct shot of electricity (lightning.) Connecting back to the source is for actual grounding - to tie in with the neutral and cause a short if any sort of ground fault were to occur. Without this, running the ground rods and electrodes would ...


3

I think you may be over-thinking this. You can make a connection on either bus without reaching across an ungrounded bus in that panel. The ground and neutral bars are so located as to give you free access to them without have to reach around or near an energized bus. You could stand to the right or left to make your connections without reaching across the ...


2

I think this is more for larger switchgear, not panels like this. This would prevent a manufacturer from building a cabinet where you have to reach your hand past the hot bus to reach the ground terminals.


2

Imagine the panel in your first photo with 78 positions, the main breaker snug against top, and the buses running all the way to the bottom. No headroom to route wires above or below the buses. Every connection must cross the buses with either a neutral or ground. It becomes a well understood convention to put 2 rows of blank covers 1/4 and 3/4 of the way ...


0

With a sub panel the neutral side is isolated and a new earth ground is needed. The neutral comes from your service panel to tie the 2 together as I believe your photo shows would “create a path for objectionable current flow” this is the reason the neutral in the sub is isolated from the ground. you can have a ground on 1 side and a neutral on the other or ...


0

At the end of the day it's about safety. So it pays to account for the user's force-of-will. If a code violation of one type or another is inevitable, it is a matter of least harm. My first read of "Continuous outer covering" was "more than the usual band of black tape you find on switch loops", e.g. covering the wire with many spiraling loops of ...


7

To my understanding, no. 250.119 Identification of Equipment Grounding Conductors. Unless required elsewhere in this Code, equipment grounding conductors shall be permitted to be bare, covered, or insulated. Individually covered or insulated equipment grounding conductors shall have a continuous outer finish that is either green or green with one ...


5

This varies greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It also depends on what kind of work and how much. In many locations, minor electrical work, in-kind plumbing replacement, interior construction that does not change the overall footprint or the number or types of bedrooms, bathrooms, etc, (such as the building of a closet in an existing room) need no ...


3

If it's officially considered "habitable space", then it's a finished basement and GFCI is not required. AFCI protection is required. An AFCI breaker, is probably the cheapest and easiest way to provide the protection.


2

Yes, this allowed according to recent versions of the IRC building code. (If your state or region has a different building code you will need to look it up yourself or specify.) To quote the code: R310.1 Emergency escape and rescue required. Basements and every sleeping room shall have at least one operable emergency and rescue opening. Such opening ...


0

The only answer is to ask your inspector. I can't see why in any case this would pose a problem as you have doors. The whole point of the egress is accessibility. Your basement has to two points in two different areas and really whether you have a door there or not.


1

If the red flaps on the red wall are doors, you should be fine, so long as the doors are and remain functional, and cannot be locked in the egress direction - i.e. from the "family room" to the office.



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