Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Since you are in a residential occupancy, you will have residential-type sprinkler heads fit, which means that NFPA 13, section 8.10.6.2.1.3 (or the equivalent citation in NFPA 13R or NFPA 13D) applies: 8.10.6.2.1.3* Unless the requirements of 8.10.6.2.1.4 through 8.1 0.6.2.1.9 are met, sprinklers shall be positioned away from obstructions a minimum ...


1

FYI: The local propane company requires that I maintain a 12" vertical separation with my electric line, so it must dip to 32"+, supplying 12" of separation under the crossing LPG pipe; in No. Calif.


1

Here's a reference to a document published by Puget Sound Energy regarding minimum separation (both horizontal and vertical) for gas and electrical service, so you can cross them. In general it looks like at least 6" vertical separation with conduit, or 12" if the electrical is direct-bury. I'd check local code. ...


0

As explained in this Electronics.SE article, daisy chaining of AC power protectors, where they both attempt to protect the same electrical circuit, can cause interference and failure. But that's not what you're doing. You have 3 protectors, for electricity, ethernet, and phone/DSL respectively. Those are 3 separate circuits, even if some of them flow into ...


2

There are (at least) two problems with this, and the solution to both is to change to THWN (or another wet-rated labeled conductor) when you change to conduit. Problem one is that stripped NM is not labeled and not acceptable per code for that reason, as @Speedy Petey said. The second is that you are running to an external location, which means that the ...


-1

i am assuming this is a USA install. once you remove the cable sheath you install it just like single wires if they are properly rated (at least as high as your peak voltage, usually 300 or 600 volts). there is no need to leave parts of the sheath on. if these wires are not rated or are not sufficient then you need to use real THHN singles or install it ...


0

you are all over thinking this and the UK answers don't help as Europe has 240 volts. USA answer: Each duplex receptacle on a 15Amp outlet can handle 15Amps, and in this scenario the wire plugged into it can handle 20Amps (12 guage) therefore there's no chance that running even 20 amps is an issue in that outlet. here's why: The only way to exceed 15amps ...



Top 50 recent answers are included