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7

Bifold rough openings: to the hinge (pivot ) side add 3/4", to the other other side, 1/4" So for single 24" wide door, a 25" RO (which is really a finished opening for bifolds) is needed. You need a bit more clearance on the pivot side, because the pivot is inboard a bit and it needs clearance to swing through (pivot around) the thickness of the door. ...


5

There is no reason you cannot have conventional double doors on a closet. Bracing the Inside Corner To solve the free corner issue, you can put a small stop, attached to the floor at the center point between the two doors. It needs to be wide enought to stop both doors (probably anything over 1 inch would do) and tall enough to catch the doors at the ...


5

There are two styles that I've seen: "Automatic closet lights" that mount at the top of the door and include the light socket. And "push button door switches" that are mounted in the door jamb and connect to a hardwired light fixture.


5

The closet doors are most likely listed in actual finished opening size. However it is a good idea to use a tape measure to check 100% for sure. Some doors are made a little oversize to allow trimming into final size for the specified opening size. Other doors may very well be made a small amount undersize to allow for the necessary clearances needed for a ...


4

You don't. Either stop the baseboard at the corner and live with the gap, or frame the opening with baseboard or molding and overhang the edge. Notice how in this picture you can't see the metal track at the top, and you also can't see the gap between the outer left/right edges of the doors and the wall. That's because the molding overhangs the wall by 1/4 ...


4

Since you want to have the drywall piece be 5" high I think you will want to have backer behind it for its full height. Consider making it 5.5" high and then using a piece of 2x6 lumber (that comes 5.5 inches wide) as the backer piece. Cut a couple of pieces to straddle across the bottom of this opening at the back and middle to hold up the shelf the full ...


4

That is a very shallow space. I think you'd need at least a couple of inches for your doors / front wall, so you're looking at less than 8" deep for the final closet. You might be better off just installing built-in shelving and/or hooks on that part of the wall to serve as storage space. You could make the shelves 8" deep and then put a sheer curtain over ...


3

As far as I know, there is no "standard" for this. I've looked for them. The only standards have to do with the actual closet dimensions that are specified in building codes. A common convention is 12" from the back wall to the center of the rod. People typically put the closet rods in the middle of the closet. Minimum closet depth is 24" so that puts the ...


2

Polyurethane Foam. The type that is used for insulation. Remove the door, remove knob and screw Tape rear hole to contain foam. Lay door flat Enlarge knob hole to allow dispensing wand to fit. (If this enlargment is too close to the knob base size, this method won't work) Dispense foam into hole. Probably a 3-4 second burst will be enough After curing ...


2

Half a hanger + the thickness of the clothes would be your minimum, but the vast majority are 12"/300mm, and most but possibly not all brackets are that size.


2

Two inches is an odd size for framing material. It might be a 2x4 set flat, which is actually 1 1/5 inches thick. It is highly likely that this framing member is attached to the cinderblock at several points. If this is so, there is no issue with just attaching to the framing. If the framing is not attached to the cinderblock, it would be significantly ...


2

Why not build your closet wall along the dotted line, but end it at the inset near the window. Build a short return wall to the edge of the inset. Then on the short wall to the left of the window, build in a bookshelf ceiling to floor that is slightly less deep than the closet wall (inset about 2-3") and just short of the window trim. You could also build ...


2

Instead of changing the size of the opening, use a pair of 24" doors in the "bypass door" configuration. They'll overlap 4" when closed and you'll have a 20" opening when they're open. If you want to increase the 20" opening, you can cut the doors to make them narrower and this will still be less work than changing the size of the doorway. Even garbage MDF ...


2

Here's another idea. Hang it from the ceiling with chain. You can then use both the top and bottom bar to hang clothes. You'll need a couple of heavy hooks to screw into the ceiling joist, some attractive chain, and a clasp to connect the chain over the pipe. You can find all of this at Lowes, Home Depot, or a hardware store. Tell them what you're doing and ...


1

You'll start by connect the grounding conductor to the green screw. The black wires that are currently attached to the old switch, will attach to the black and brass colored screws on the new switch. Finally you'll have to locate a grounded "neutral" wire; or group of wires, within the box. Using a twist-on wire connector, connect a short bit of wire to the ...


1

If you want to "get rid of the shiny look" why would apply lacquer at all? Shiny is what lacquer does. If the only issue you have with the lacquer is that it's shiny, all you may need to do is rub the doors down with steel wool or Scotchbrite® (generically, non-woven abrasive pads) to take the shine off. But don't apply more lacquer if you don't want it to ...


1

The standard is 67" up to the top of a 1X4 ledger and 12" from drywall for single hanging. the centerline of the closet pole cup is typically is 2" from the top of the ledger, it can be lower, then the ledger needs to be wider to accommodate. That puts the shelf at 67 3/4" to the top. The 11 1/4" shelf will give the room needed to get the hanger on. This is ...


1

The most straightforward way to make this into a clothing rack is to add a piece of wood as a base or "foot". You can probably remove one side of the rectangle to turn it into an upside-down "U" shape. Connect the sides to a wood base using pipe flanges. If this is put together with threaded plumbing pipe, you can simply buy flanges to match at the ...


1

That is a reflective sheet to help use more of your bulbs' light output. So if you want the same sort of brightness as you had, yep, you do need to replace it. But for a closet, I personally wouldn't bother. The maximum wattage should be stamped somewhere on the light. If in doubt, use LEDs or similar bulbs that don't push out as much heat as the equivalent ...


1

10 inches (254 mm) to the center of the rod, minimum. The widest hangers I know about are 18.5", so half of that is 9.25" plus 3/4" wiggle room. Though some hanger rod brackets are ~12" (304.8 mm) to the center of the rod.


1

Not really. To frame it out you would need to use 2x4 or 2x3. Add in the sheetrock thickness on top and now it is only 5 to 6 inches deep at most. That's not a lot of depth. It sounds like a good area to put shelves or a built in with shelving. I know if I saw a closet in a house like that I would wonder why it is there. I think @Henry's idea is the ...


1

Most likely nailed from above into braces. May be glued and/or caulked, so run a utility knife or window razor (single straight edge razor in a holder). Then, as suggested by DA01 and Jacob S, wack upwards with a rubber mallet or a regular hammer into a block of wood


1

As far as I know junction boxes are ok for closets. Your local jurisdiction may have other ideas. Please consider consulting them. Today's circuit panels are full of (expensive) AFCI breakers that will be damaged by flooding and running many wires can get expensive with current copper prices. Could you instead run a heavier gauge wire to a subpanel ...


1

You usually start with the current opening (if finished) and pick a standard door size, add in for gaps (3 gaps: Left hinge, right hinge and center). Typical gap sizes would be 1/8 on either side and 3/16 in the middle If the opening is currently drywall, the corner beads would be removed and a wooden jamb is installed left, top and bottom. Casing ...


1

You can get custom made doors of almost any size that you need. Even if they cost a little more than the low cost standard sized units from big box strores you are likely to come out better off than trying to get into a lot of work modifying an existing opening. (Saving that pain is worth something too). For your sized opening I really recommend that you ...


1

One thing that instantly came to mind was this: I bought one from Goodwill years ago, the top on mine swivels but then you would have to take it out or fight it to get to the other side. I also found this: This model specifically seems to be for over the door mounting but I bet you find a flush mount one or install a 2x4 in the back of the closest as a ...



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