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9

Your tub has an overflow drain. You just have to find it. Remove the two screws next to the combination drain toggle & overflow plate. Now gently pull up to reveal the overflow hole and the drain plug: Get out your snake (you've got a snake, right?) and thread it down the newly revealed hole. Also remove the single screw holding the drain screen. ...


6

The toilet auger is designed to protect the visible finish at the bottom of your toilet where a drain auger could leave scratch marks. It's also possible for a drain auger to get twisted inside of the large diameter of the toilet drain. Given the issues with the drain auger, I'd recommend going back and getting one designed for the toilet.


6

If the sink is backing up into the toilet, then the clog is at or after the junction of the two in your drain lines. You'll have to snake the drain to remove the clog, and it will likely be beyond the reach of a standard toilet auger. You could remove the trap on your sink and attempt to snake it from there, or remove the toilet and run the snake down that ...


6

Sounds like the chewed up gunk from the disposal has largely blocked the drain pipe. Try a plunger first (block all other connected drains) but that may or may not be effective depending on how far along the clog is. If the simple solution doesn't work, you'll have to open a clean-out (or the U-trap) and use an auger to break it out. You can rent a ...


5

Sounds to me like your sink and toilet run to the same sewer line and the clog is after they join. You won't be able to plunge it free because the water will push back up the drain towards the sink rather than applying pressure on the clog. Even plugging the sink drain won't help because there is a vent stack that will be open (and you don't want to risk ...


5

The cover for the bath plug includes the overflow drain. The bottom has an opening that is your overflow drain. If you remove the cover of the over flow to snake it, exercise care not to drop any parts down either drain. And be gentle with the snake so that you don't damage the drain plug assembly. If you use the plungers, remember that you're trying to ...


3

You probably (and hopefully) have a large amount of sand/grout stuck in the P trap. If so your best bet would be to remove the P trap and give it a good thorough cleaning (out in the yard, with a hose). (While the trap is off you'll be able to inspect the tailpiece and the drain line as it goes into the wall and clean those up too if necessary.) If you ...


3

You are going to need to "pig" the line. You will need to insert something very slightly smaller than the pipe diameter (so it doesn't get stuck!) into the pump side of the pipe (i.e. where the whiffle ball wants to go "to") a tennis ball or racquet ball might work, so might just some crumpled up news paper. Seal your pig into the pipe and rig up a fitting ...


3

One frequent cause of backups is that a root from a tree or large bush has grown into the pipe. If that's happened to you, you'll need to dig up the clogged area to sever the root and then repair the pipe, or if it's a porous drain pipe, wrap it in a landscaping fabric. As Tester says, use a snake to see what you can find. You can also measure the distance ...


2

Look under the sink to know for sure, but you likely need a combination of pipe wrenches (cast iron) or screw drivers (compression fittings) or possibly just your hand (hand-screwed PVC joints). Be sure to unplug the garbage disposal first. What has likely happened is that it's your disposal that's clogged rather than the pipe. Disposals can't handle ...


2

You'll need an auger to clear the clog in the pipes: Loosen the clamp at the metal end and begin inserting the snake (metal coily wire) into the pipe until you hit the blockage (or get stuck in a corner). Tighten the clamp and turn the plastic handle to spin the snake. That will help penetrate the blockage (or realign the snake to get it around the ...


2

I would start by removing the trap, putting a bucket underneath the tailpiece (below the sink) and just running some water and seeing what happens. Clean out the trap while you're at it and make sure there isn't a mess of hair stuck in there. If it all comes through without a problem and doesn't back up, then I would suggest buying a snake and going ...


2

Water usually seeps past most blockages, but not always. You may have to hand bail the bowl down 1/3 or 1/2. THEN employ a plunger. The older cup plungers worked best with a strong UP pull (hence the bowl draining). If its a newer, smaller tank, an older cup plunger may not make a tight fit: This style may work better and will both push and pull ...


2

The plumber you had out kind of left you hanging. He should have put a camera down there to give you more details on what is going on. Basically your septic tank is backing up or you have an issue with the main line. It could be slight collapsed or pinched or have roots growing in it or whatever. So your first step is to have someone come out with ...


1

Sounds like your sewer line is clogged. Call a plumber for this one, they have the long snake and the power to eat through things like tree roots.


1

I have to wonder if the bathroom vent is really "fine" or if it's failed in some manner so that it vents out of the bathroom, into the attic (rather than out of the bathroom, through the attic and out of the wall) - that would certainly add a lot of water vapor to the attic...which would be one way to clog up the vents.


1

You'll need a different tool to get the plunger and/or linkage - your drain snake would be unlikely to get it. You might have one of these grabber tools somewhere in the house, and it would be worth trying it (down the access plate opening, so it's got a straight shot at the plug.) If that fails, you're probably near the tipping point where calling a plumber ...


1

Any of those options will work, let me reorder them to: Easy option: Cap off the sink hole & garbage disposal. Leave the P-Trap and cap the pipe off after that. Remove all the pipes under sink & garbage disposal and cap off main pipe at wall. Now they're in order of ease and how temporary you want. If you want to simply stop the sewage fumes, ...


1

Check your pop-up and clean it. You might need to replace the pop-up. Snake the drain and clean the sink before installing a new pop-up.


1

I'm at a loss to explain how water is getting into the overflow area such that it runs out the inlet. Perhaps your basin has an unusual configuration that allows leakage from the faucet to collect in the overflow area. Not only is this an unusual configuration, but faucets should not be leaking anywhere as well. Even lacking a reasonable explanation, one ...


1

Plunging may not help since the clog is past the point where the sink and disposal tie together. The pressure the plunger generates is vented into the disposal. If your disposal has a rubber drain plug have someone hold it firmly in place while you plunge. This is most effective with water in the sink and the disposal. Since the water won't compress like air ...


1

I had similar issues with some items in the disposal. I removed the output and saw that something was blocking the exit tube. It turn out the exit tube itself was rusted and in bad shape. Since my disposal was older I just replaced it and it has been working well since. I never would have thought the exit tube would be deformed from the rust. It was blocked ...


1

The chemical I know for cleaning mortar is muriatic acid. You should be able to find it in a home improvement store. You might try pouring a cup or two down the drain and letting it sit for a few hours before hitting it with a plumbers snake and a lot of hot water. My only word of caution is that I don't know if it would react with the drain pipes at all, ...


1

Have a look at the trap under your sink. Assuming it's PVC with large plastic nuts, all you should need is ChannelLock pliers: Unscrew the trap from the wall and disposal, and clean the trap itself, or snake the drain going into the wall, depending on where your clog is. Be sure to have a bucket and towels handy since there will be water backed up before ...



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