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There is nothing you can do once black mold grows, I've tried everything. Just throw it away and buy another and do this. When you get your new one after using the tub remove the rubber mat and roll it in a towel to dry it. When thoroughly dry no mold will grow. Sorry to say there is no easy way to keep your mat mold free other that to keep it completely dry ...


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I think you have a "chrome" film over the faucet. It looks like the film has corroded badly. I have fixed shower heads with auto body primer (spray paint), spray paint for the finish, and then a gloss coat. This being touched a lot you can try painting it but replacement is probably the better option - and never buy any plumbing fixtures that aren't a ...


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First of all, real "chrome" finishes are actually nickel. Secondly it is not a nickel finish, it is some kind of plastic or cheap metal engineered to look like nickel. Buffing with scotch brite might make the color more uniform, but the mirror look is probably gone forever.


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Im am no expert in this topic, But I do clean metals often. I can only say what I would try. Most of the time the answer is just to polish and clean manually. From what I can see, you have relatively hard water, and you tried to clean mineral deposits off the faucet. The Vinegar was the correct application, however you are left with some residual mineral ...


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I use lighter fluid and a paper towel. Works great!


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Acid. Vinegar, Citric (aka sour salt), CLR, Barkeepers friend, phosphoric, etc. Keep applying (and re-applying) it, and see if perhaps you can get dry citric acid or barkeepers friend mixed to a "paste" or "slurry" form that might cling to the problem area - or fill the trap with acid and use sections of rope or rags (secured against going down the drain) to ...


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Cigarette stench is a bad one - good luck, you'll need it. I would have moved on to a different sale, personally. You could try using saddle soap (buy it at a tack shop) and scrubbing the surface down. Follow the instructions on the can. Might need to repeat 3-4 times. If there's a fabric bottom, remove, discard, and replace it. You might also consider ...


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If you are sure it is hard water deposits- CLR. If it is soap film (and it might be)- cleanser with phosphoric acid. Close the door and keep your sensitive child (really, all kids) out. Rinse and repeat ad nauseum... then ventilate.


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You can also try a shot of vinegar concentrate poured into a small bowl with water.


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Couple things I have used that work well and are fairly mild are Barkeeper's Friend Soft Cleanser and Simple Green Clean Building Concentrated Bathroom Cleanser along with a blue scotch sponge. It's important to leave either cleaner on the glass for a while before you start scrubbing to let it work. The more you leave it on the easier it is to clean. ...


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This really depends on the exact cause of your water issues. When I buy a house with a lot of build up on the glass I try the following steps in pretty much this order: Hot vinegar on paper towels. Stick paper towels on door. Note that when using vinegar you can ruin nearby towels/clothing. Hot vinegar/Dawn/baking soda paste. Rub it on door, let sit ...


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Ammonia is not the right chemical anyway. Try vinegar; if that's too much of a chemical for you, get out a razor blade and start scraping. Or rinse after using it.... Once you have it clean, use a squeegee to remove any water from it before it dries after each use to keep it clean.


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I think the most common solution is to just let stuff slip under your couch and move couch every once in a while and pick up the stuff. If you want to get fancy you can get some metal "L"s from the big box around you and screw them to the bottom of the couch to create a "crap barrier". This would take a couple of cuts and 4-5 screws per "L". $10-15 and ...


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You will probably need to use a combination of methods which were suggested by longneck and Tester101 to completely remove the residue. A window scraper tool uses the type of blades in Tester's picture. Using the tool will make it easier to scrape with instead of just a blade. After the majority of it is scraped off, then you can use a solvent to remove ...


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You might have luck with a razor blade. This is what's commonly used by mechanics, to remove registration and inspection stickers from vehicle windshields. *Warning: Don't use razor blades on windows with films or special coatings.


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WD-40 says it removes adhesive residue Research: http://wd40.com/uses-tips/construction/removes-adhesive-residue


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Use something like Goof Off or Goo Gone to dissolve the solvent, or something with orange oil in it, and then scrape it off. You might have to repeat a couple of times. BTW, taping windows provides no additional protection during a hurricane. Don't bother.


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For years, I tried to find the source of my stinky sinks. Not just the kitchen sink, but my bathroom sinks also had a 'sewer odor'. I cleaned sinks, pipes, garbage disposal, etc. I cleaned, poured, disassembled and checked traps, cleaned traps, you name it; I did it. FINALLY, someone suggested that I clean my dishwasher. I never would have thought of this. ...


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Cleaning them: If I have good access from outside I push up screen (or remove), close window and hit it with a hose or power washer - from a decent distance. Open window and get everything wet. Soap and hot water. With one paper towel you can take away 90% of the dirt on one window. Use old toothbrush, old butter knife, and a washcloth on the rest. Dry ...


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If this is for adults only I wouldn't be worried about it. I have a large dry-erase board in my office that my family uses and light tan carpet and we have never had an issue. The key is making sure you whiteboard has a tray to put the markers in and not to leave markers open (which dries them out). If for kids I would say you run the same risk as them ...



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