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Just to propose an alternative: You could consider applying dewaxed shellac or other over the stains to seal them in, and let them be part of the item's history. (I'm presuming her main concern is that it might smudge other things around it. If she really wants it to look "clean", of course, this suggestion isn't useful.)


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Here's a few tricks I've learned from cleaning up a few old wooden handplanes, where I wanted them to look nice without taking all the patina off: give it a rub-down with oil, either curing (e.g. linseed oil), or non-curing (e.g. mineral oil, camellia oil). If you use a curing oil, it's more permanent. This may even out the stains a little bit without ...


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Mineral spirits won't work. You need something stronger like acetone. If you have ceramic tiles they won't be harmed.


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I would trying using Mineral Spirits with a scrap piece of cloth or a toothbrush/brush to scrub if need be. Mineral Spirits is used to clean brushes and other finishes from other things, so this may be something to try.


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Use a solvent degreaser for concrete floors, following manufacturer's instructions, on the oily areas. Then mop with warm water mixed with a bit of liquid laundry detergent and let it dry. If the treated area looks different due to alteration of the "waxy finish", use a hard floor wax remover on the entire floor, again follow instructions. If you wish to ...


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I recently prepped two rooms for primer and paint. I read that the best prep is to use water and sponge as you did. It was not so much the drywall compound dust, as the thin coating of kaolin the drywall manufacturer uses to keep sheets from sticking together that the water will take off. I currently have a garage ceiling to scrape, mud, and prime, that ...



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