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It may be air pollution like the smell of ozone that has been described as a fishy smell or even like bleach by others.


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Depending on how badly the item is damaged and how much you care, I probably wouldn't bother to do anything. A little bit of heat damage is not going to affect the function or durability. If you did want to take a crack at it, Bar Keepers Friend is a cheap and easy-to-find cleaner for stainless steel items. You could try scrubbing it with that, per the ...


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i am not sure what ben is talking about, but then again, i am unfamiliar with bialetti coffemakers. i am however, very familiar with stainless steel. if this is just a question of removing heat discoloration from stainless steel, its pretty straightforward. your part is probably made from 316 stainless, but most likely 304 stainless. you may have changed ...


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Whether you have the silver/chrome base or the stainless steel, then unfortunately, no. The steel has lost it's temper (metallurgical changes) and it is not stainless anymore (it can rust now), and this aspect can't be cleaned or repaired. It could be refinished by electroplating it (not really a DIY thing, and although there are electroplaters for hire, the ...


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Perhaps I'm missing an obvious problem, but I'd simply pour off the dirty stain in the mixture into a waste container and then save the clean spirits that remain below.


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You need at least the same flow rate out of the hose that the pressure washer uses. look at the GPM (Gallons per minute). With the hose on the roof, run the hose wide open for a minute or 2 so you will have the true flow rate. Then fill a bucket and time how long it takes divide by the size of the bucket if your unit uses 2.5 gallons per minute, a 1 gallon ...


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Muriatic acid (hydrochloric acid) is the best concrete cleaner. CLR is (mostly) phosphoric acid and soap. The problem is, concrete is essentially calcium carbonate which is just holding aggregate/material together. Calcium carbonate will partially/slowly react with phosphoric acid to produce calcium phosphate... which is probably what the "white stains" on ...


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A favorite trick of mine with surface stains on concrete, is to take a concrete block and crack it into chunks with a 5 pound hammer, or something. Then take a chunk of the concrete block and place the flat side down (what was formerly an exterior face of the block) on the concrete and start sanding in a circular motion (aka Mr. Miyagi's wax on/wax off). ...


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As someone who is a student of chemistry, I would say that lye is not toxic, it's caustic. In fact, it's less toxic than Tylenol, mg for mg. This doesn't mean it isn't dangerous; concentrated sodium hydroxide is quite hazardous, but is safe to dispose of by rinsing with plenty of water (you can't overdo it). Sodium hydroxide breaks up organic matter by ...



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