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3

They DO pass current through the switch and light at all times - just a few mA. The indicator is wired in parallel to the switch contacts. For most types of bulbs its not enough for the light to turn on. However with modern LED light bulbs these types of switches (as well as dimmers, and home automation switches) that dont use the neutral can cause the ...


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From what I've seen, they pass a small current through the switch (and light), and that current is sufficient to power the illuminated switch light.


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I believe some of these have a neon bulb in parallel with the switch. This means they draw a small amount of current through any light-bulb the switch controls - however this is too small a current to produce any light in the light-bulb. A textured polycarbonate moulding designed to allow the glow of the two integral neons to be seen at almost any ...


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Grab a cheap $2 single pole toggle switch from a local hardware store just to make sure it's not your dimmer. If not check all your wiring using the utmost common sense and precaution, wear leather gloves if needed, turn off the power from the breaker, test the line again with a fluke tester (very cheap $5-$8, I suggest you buy one if you're going to do ...


1

The dimmer is blown, trying turning off the breaker and connecting the line and load for the chandelier(bypass the dimmer), and see what happens when you turn on the breaker. Most dimmer manufacturers recommend using a toggle switch to test new light fixtures, that way if there's a short you don't kill a good dimmer.


3

It sounds like you have a bad connection or a broken wire somewhere upstream of your main breaker. Assuming that the power company's test were valid, then the problem would be the wire between your main breaker and the power meter. Other possibilities are that your main breaker is bad, or that the meter, meter box, or something upstream of that is broken. ...


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How do you measure the voltage? Do you use a resistor or just touch the leads with a volt meter? If there is not resistive load in the circuit the voltage might just be floating. Does the voltage drop faster to normal from 1 kV when you measure over e.g. light bulb? You could measure the phase difference between the voltage or current. They should be in the ...


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Wire from the panel to the closest outlet. Use Ratchet Freak's recommendation of using a GFCI since this has a potential to become a wet location. Put the GFCI at the first outlet location and wire the line/feed side of the outlet to the wire running from the panel. Add a second wire that will chain the second outlet to this outlet. On the GFCI, the ...


2

The shaking probably shook a wire loose besides causing a leak, or the leak flooded over a set of wires and shorted the wire to the casing. The GFCI did it's job by detecting the short to ground and shutting down the power. trying to reconnect with the fault in place will then cause the GFCI to trip again. The dryer is protected by the same GFCI so when it ...


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The wiring looks normal. However, you said "20 amp breaker". The wires look like 14ga, which is 15 amps max. How powerful is the outdoor floodlight? >1000 watts and it's likely the cause. Assuming the floodlight is under 1000 watts, does the breaker trip immediately, or after a few minutes? Breakers do get weaker as they age, try replacing the breaker.


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Foam board should never be exposed, it should always covered with a fire retardant layer like drywall. So if it is installed correctly, your breaker box would never come in direct contact with the XPS and you don't have a problem. If it is exposed, then you have a larger problem then just the breaker box making contact with it.


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Heat is a byproduct of energy use. The electrical panel should not be generating heat in normal circumstances and doing so would be symptomatic of a hazardous condition. Thus, it is normal to insulate around an electrical panel.



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