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The old way of running kitchen plugs was to split the top and bottom plugs so each plug was on a seperate feed. This was accomplished by running 3 wire between the plugs and removing the breaker tabs, the entire thing was conected to a dual pole break so the entire plug would trip at once. If your house was built to code before the advent of gfci this is ...


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Tester101 nailed the question, so I'll cover another option. Depending on your situation, it is often possible to retrofit ground. Normally, wires in a circuit must be kept together for good reason. Ground is a special case, it can be routed separately from the other wires in a retrofit situation. That is because ground is not used to flow current ...


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They are not grounded, though may be GFCI protected. If they are wired off the load side of the GFCI, then they are GFCI protected. In which case they should be labeled with stickers that say "GFCI PROTECTED", and "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND ".


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No, they are not grounded. Yes, they are GFCI protected (as long as they are on the LOAD side of the GFCI). You are allowed to protect older ungrounded outlets by GFCI protecting them, though it's still preferable (but more invasive) to actually get ground wires everywhere. If you have any 3-prong outlets without a ground, they must be GFCI protected and ...


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You know those coils are cheap, consumable, field-replaceable items. It's common for departing tenants to replace drip pans and coils that are too dirty to clean easily. The coil may have lost some of its insulation and developed a short to chassis. But generally they are not valuable enough to ask "why".


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Sounds like the coil is shorted and providing far less of a resistive heating path than it should be. It should be trashed and replaced as I don't think there is a way to fix that coil, unless you can specifically see the short between the two prongs that plug into the range.


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Modern GFCI devices will not set if the LINE and LOAD are reversed. If there's power on the LOAD wires, the device will not (and should not) set. It sounds like the GFCI is working as designed. You're going to have to figure out how both circuits are wired, to determine if this is intentional or accidental. If it's intentional, you can simply cap one set ...


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Yes, you can use existing wiring to feed a sub-panel. (you cannot put a plug on a sub-panel as far as I know.) If the wiring is not quite long enough to reach your sub-panel location, put a junction box there and splice to an additional cable. Your sub-panel absolutely requires a ground wire to the main panel. Grounds can only be bare wire, green or ...


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Jay welcome to stack exchange. You can create a sub panel from your house to the garage it will take a minimum of 3 wires and possibly 4 depending on where you live. 2 hot 1 ground, 1 neutral. The ground and neutral need to be isolated in a sub panel. The big question is the size wires. Wire size depends on the breaker you will be feeding it with and the ...


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Given the large size of the conductors, I would use aluminum for this, specifically the new AA-8000 series alloys. Yes, aluminum has a bad reputation as a wire. But that only applied to the faulty AA-1300 alloys installed during the postwar housing boom, and even then to the small-gauge stuff where it was used instead of 12-14 gauge copper. 1300 is now ...



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