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1

Depends how they are wired - "star" wiring (where each outlet has its own wire leading back to a junction box) will give the described result, but is unusual. Then again, as implied in comments, a "pigtailed" circuit where each outlet is connected to a short wire that connects (typically with a wirenut in the box) to the wires leading to the source of power ...


0

Even if the 150A breaker existed (and it seems like it doesn't), that's unfortunately just the start. You would almost certainly need to upgrade the conductors to and from the 150A breakers for the higher ampacity, and quite possibly the conduit in which they travel as well, which would involve significant expense. And then the main panel to which they ...


2

If you really had an open neutral, that outlet would not work. My theory is that the surge suppressor is a surge suppressor, not an outlet tester, and it is a terrible outlet tester. Otherwise, this means some lunkhead wired every single outlet in your house backwards. Can you try it at a friend's house (in a different housing tract) or at the office? Is ...


2

L and N reverse; and Open Neutral ... Is it normal? No. Should I avoid using appliances?(untill corrected) I would make getting this properly diagnosed and fixed a top priority.


3

That is precisely a Multi-Wire Branch Circuit (or MWBC). Those are defined as exactly what you drew: 2 hots that share a neutral up to a point. Your setup is fine, but with one problem. It's not the breakers. When you removed that outlet, you interrupted the neutral for the other half of the circuit. Around 2002, they changed Code to prohibit MWBC ...


1

As an answer to the last part of your updated question: If you want two separate breakers instead of a double-pole breaker, you will need to rewire from the panel to the point at which the circuits currently diverge from the 14/3 wiring so that there are truly two separate circuits without a shared neutral. I would recommend an electrician for this type of ...


6

That's what's known as a Multi-wire Branch Circuit, and it's perfectly acceptable if done properly. Though it sounds like yours is not. First, the ungrounded (hot) conductors must be on separate legs of the service. Secondly, the breaker(s) protecting the circuit must have the handles tied together, or a double pole breaker should be used. To fix the ...


3

Anytime a dead wire runs parallel to a hot one, it will pick up phantom voltage. You can see it with a rather sensitive voltmeter like a modern DVM, but it won't do any useful work. In other words this is an issue with your voltmeter. Stick a dollar-store nightlight in each outlet and that will eliminate the phantoms. The bigger problem is this ...


2

Sounds like you have a Multi-wire Branch Circuit, so the breaker handles should be tied together, or a double pole breaker should be used. And each breaker should be on an opposite leg of the service, to avoid overloading the neutral. If only one breaker is on, then the other hot is floating. Which means a digital multimeter could measure anywhere from 0 ...


0

It will likely fit & you probably won't have any problems. But, read the panel's door for specifics of a replacement. Some panels are very particular about what materials or brands of breakers go in. If there's no mention of "only these brands", then whatever fits securely will be fine...they all have to meet the same standards, looks don't mean ...



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