Hot answers tagged

7

REPLACE THIS PANEL NOW Your panel almost certainly is suffering from breaker-to-busbar contact damage, rendering it a ticking incendiary device. See this answer for the gory details on just what is wrong with FPE's "breakers". If you post a picture of your panel (dead front off), I can determine if you can have your electrician install one of the Eaton ...


7

i am not an electrician but I do know federal pacific went out of business years ago after it was found that their boxes were responsible for a number of fires. Change the entire panel just to be safe. keeping the federal pacific panel is asking for a trouble.


6

Friedo's answer is essentially correct regarding the multi wire branch circuit except if these are 15 amp circuits they could not be used to feed the kitchen receptacles. Those are required to be 20 amp circuits. The code requires multi-wire branch circuits to be fed with either a multi-pole breaker or two breakers tied together with an approved handle tie. ...


5

My guess is these might be multiwire branch circuits for use in kitchen receptacles. In this type of circuit, the two hot wires (180 degrees apart in phase) are used to power different receptacles in the kitchen so high-current appliances don't all end up on the same circuit. Because they are opposite phases, they can share a neutral without fear of ...


5

It's either a loose connection, a bad switch, or a poltergeist. Turn power off to the circuit. Verify power is off. Remove the cover plate from each switch. Remove the screws holding the switches to the box (should be two, one top, one bottom). Pull the switches out a bit. Inspect the wiring and connections, looking for loose wires, charred/burnt/melted ...


5

Good question, but pause to think: What if all your wiring was in EMT metal conduit? (In which the conduit is the ground). There'd be no choice to bond the grounds, and thus, it is OK. This question is even easier since you are working out of a sub-panel, which already has its ground bonded to the main panel; that is, one ground rod for the whole house. ...


4

It is okay to have 800 amps of breakers in a 200 amp service panel. The reason there is a main breaker (200 amp double pole) is to prevent unsafe usage. When you run out of physical space, there are several solutions: Replace some of the main panel breakers with half-widths (two breakers per slot) to create enough space for a new breaker. Install a ...


4

Update the panel, it needs it.... An electrician needs to do this. The breaker simply cannot be changed out to a higher rated breaker, the wiring has to support it too. This is what a qualified electrician can do. The electrician can tell you if it is possible for it to be done with your existing wiring.


4

They are not grounded, though may be GFCI protected. If they are wired off the load side of the GFCI, then they are GFCI protected. In which case they should be labeled with stickers that say "GFCI PROTECTED", and "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND ".


3

You can use most types of conduit outdoors, though some will require liquidtight fittings. Cost wise, and due to the ease of use, I'd recommend schedule 80 PVC conduit. As long as you use the proper size conduit and boxes, you can indeed run all the circuits through the same conduit. If you used 14 AWG THWN conductors (15 ampere circuit), you could ...


3

Bottom line is NO, you definitely cannot do what you propose. You CANNOT parallel a circuit like this of this size. It is expressly forbidden in the NEC, and could very well be a safety hazard. If the appliance takes two separate circuits like your old one that is a different story. Do you know what size and type of wire is feeding the old 30A circuits? ...


3

The National Electrical Code defines a Multi-wire branch circuit as follows. Branch Circuit, Multiwire. A branch circuit that consists of two or more ungrounded conductors that have a voltage between them, and a grounded conductor that has equal voltage between it and each ungrounded conductor of the circuit and that is connected to the neutral or ...


3

You say you are replacing a 100A panel with a 200A, but the wires won't reach??? It is almost a certainty that you will need to replace the wires. It is extremely unlikely that they originally ran wire large enough for a 200A service, yet only installed a 100A panel. Also, with pretty much all new main-breaker panels, the breaker can be mounted top or ...


3

Aside from being a code violation of outrageous proportions, if this is 120VAC you would have the delightful condition that the light sockets were always hot/live - this can make changing a lightbulb into a shocking experience, and under the right conditions, also your last. You may also get some interesting magnetic effects from the loop wiring. Don't do ...


3

One likely reason is that the light bulbs came from a defective batch. You could try moving a known working bulb from a different location to the suspicious location to verify. Another reason is that there could be an over-voltage. If possible, use a volt meter to measure the voltage. The voltage should be somewhere between 105 and 125 V (in the united ...


3

I have recently had issues with different electrical appliances ... Having the outlets very low down must put a strain on the leads where they enter the plug. Other than that any suspected problems with the electrical supply need to be discussed with the supplier. / light bulb ... Incandescent bulbs tend to fail when there is problems with the ...


3

As long as the junction box is not over filled (as per code), the connection device (Wire-NutĀ®) is properly sized for all the wires, and the junction box remains accessible. There's no problem wiring the circuit in such a way.


3

You know those coils are cheap, consumable, field-replaceable items. It's common for departing tenants to replace drip pans and coils that are too dirty to clean easily. The coil may have lost some of its insulation and developed a short to chassis. But generally they are not valuable enough to ask "why".


2

You have a FPE panel, so why are you trying to put breakers in it? Just replace the entire panel, as the panel is telling you to...the fact you can't stick a breaker in easily should be a gigantic red flag that something is badly broken inside and you shouldn't bother trying to repair it!


2

There are 60 new homes next to my house using AFCI breakers. Low power radio signals trip these breakers as some AFCI designs use a radio receiver to detect the presence of RF in the HF spectrum. For these breakers, even a kids CB walki-talkie (not FRS) can trip every breaker in the house. Load or no-load, it does not matter. The branch circuit wiring is ...


2

Do not just install a 2 pole 50 amp Breaker. First your wire would need to be rated for the correct breaker. Second if the oven is rated at FLA (Full Load Amp) not to exceed 40 amps and there was a fault, the 50 amp breaker may not trip and could start a fire or kill someone. If you can wait look at Amazon, one quick search and there it was. Also look at a ...


2

You should check if your new panel (or return it and buy a new panel that) can have the main at the bottom. My 200 amp panel (Sq D QO - evidently "convertible") is labeled/listed for both directions. My habit-following electrician (I do many things, but hired a pro for the main service connection) was about to complicate life considerably by trying to put ...


2

The first thing to check since this is an outdoor outlet is to see if there is a GFCI device built-in ("test" and "reset" buttons on the outlet). The GFCI may have cut power to the outlet. Sometimes several outlets are connected to a single GFCI so if there isn't one at that outlet look for others nearby. All outdoor outlets are required to have GFCI ...


2

In a residential load calculation, general-use receptacles are included in with the 3 volt-ampere (VA) per square foot general lighting value. In other than dwelling units, receptacles are calculated at 180 VA. If you wanted to use the 180 VA value, it would be 1.5 amperes (180VA / 120V = 1.5 A).


2

If there's no current to the fixture or switch, then the fault is upstream. The fact that it was flickering indicates a failing connection, possibly arcing somewhere, which can be a fire hazard. You should check all the junctions on this circuit from the switch back to the breaker until you locate one with a good hot, neutral, and ground connection. And then ...


2

Possibly a coincidence having 3 bulbs burn-out, but here are some suggestions. The voltage in the circuit is over the normal household 120 volts. It would be best to verify this with a voltage tester. It could be the brand of bulbs that you used. My local Ace brand light bulbs are the lowest priced bulbs on the shelf (for good reason), but they don't last ...


2

If the switches are basic (not 3-way and not having some special feature needing a neutral), you are correct. The simplest way to remove the switch and leave the outlets always live is to twist the two wires (other than the bare or green ground wire) from the switch together and cover with a wire nut. These will most likely be both black, black and red, or ...


2

Whether or not the GFCI is the first as far as proximity from the panel, it would have to be the first if you want it to protect the other receptacles. However, since you're going the route of covering so many receptacles. I'd recommend just getting a GFCI breaker to cover the whole line. Do you want to have all of the receptacles GFCI covered? You would ...


2

That's a big job. I had to sort out a bunch of wiring in an old factory which had a lot of neutral problems. I shut off service to the building and, at the panel, "pulled off" one hot and neutral off each circuit and did a series of diagnostics, checking for resistance between it and the rest of the neutrals, and resistance between the hot and neutral, ...


2

It depends on what you have access to see. Typically wires are colored accordingly to their ampacity for easy identification. For a 50A breaker, and 40A, you'd need #8 AWG wire so it should be sized correctly now. However this is assuming it's up to code, so it's best to check. Should be black coated wire. Again though, it all depends on what's ran. The ...



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