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7

REPLACE THIS PANEL NOW Your panel almost certainly is suffering from breaker-to-busbar contact damage, rendering it a ticking incendiary device. See this answer for the gory details on just what is wrong with FPE's "breakers". If you post a picture of your panel (dead front off), I can determine if you can have your electrician install one of the Eaton ...


6

i am not an electrician but I do know federal pacific went out of business years ago after it was found that their boxes were responsible for a number of fires. Change the entire panel just to be safe. keeping the federal pacific panel is asking for a trouble.


4

The amp rating of the receptacle and circuit do not depend on whether the receptacle is a GFCI or not: If you have a 15 amp circuit, you must have 15 amp receptacles If you have a 20 amp circuit, you can either have 20 amp receptacles, or 15 amp receptacles if there is more than one (e.g. a duplex receptacle). It's not unusual to have a 20 amp GFCI in a ...


4

1) You can have a GFI receptacle on either a 15 or 20A circuit. Keep in mind, areas like kitchens, bathrooms, laundry, etc, typically require 20A circuits for receptacles. For areas like outside and garages 20A circuits are always a good idea. 2) Either. You can have a GFI receptacle and feed everything downstream of it off the LOAD terminals protecting ...


4

They DO pass current through the switch and light at all times - just a few mA. The indicator is wired in parallel to the switch contacts. For most types of bulbs its not enough for the light to turn on. However with modern LED light bulbs these types of switches (as well as dimmers, and home automation switches) that dont use the neutral can cause the ...


4

10 gauge wire can have a 30 amp breaker under the current National Electric Code. (and past ones too). Most places use the NEC, but some make changes. I do not have my book right here, but if needed I can get you the exact section in the code for that data. I am 'sure' he carries a current copy of the NEC with him, for reference. Aloysius is also ...


4

There are a couple of possibilities for how this could happen, but the simplest theory is that you failed to reconnect the wire feeding those outlets to the LOAD side terminals on the GFCIs. Turn the power off to the kitchen circuits and check in the GFCI-containing boxes for loose/unconnected wires. If you don't find anything in there, there are three ...


4

The short answer is that the breaker protects the wire (otherwise, heat and fire can result). You can put a 20A breaker on a circuit if all the wire on the circuit is #12. If any of the wire is #14 you can put a 15A breaker on it. If any of the wire in the circuit is smaller than #14, then you cannot put a 15A breaker on it.


4

It is okay to have 800 amps of breakers in a 200 amp service panel. The reason there is a main breaker (200 amp double pole) is to prevent unsafe usage. When you run out of physical space, there are several solutions: Replace some of the main panel breakers with half-widths (two breakers per slot) to create enough space for a new breaker. Install a ...


3

A parallel circuit is what you're referring to. In a series circuit, if one connection is broken, the entire circuit is broken.


3

The shaking probably shook a wire loose besides causing a leak, or the leak flooded over a set of wires and shorted the wire to the casing. The GFCI did it's job by detecting the short to ground and shutting down the power. trying to reconnect with the fault in place will then cause the GFCI to trip again. The dryer is protected by the same GFCI so when it ...


3

The problem is, whenever you turn one set of lights on, power can go through that shared light into the other circuit. So each switch controls all lights. While it -might- be possible to make 2 light groups (1 common light) work the way you want with two 4-way switches back-wired through each other, you're asking for something even more complicated. Each ...


3

It sounds like you have a bad connection or a broken wire somewhere upstream of your main breaker. Assuming that the power company's test were valid, then the problem would be the wire between your main breaker and the power meter. Other possibilities are that your main breaker is bad, or that the meter, meter box, or something upstream of that is broken. ...


3

It all depends on several things. What size is the circuit? What else is one it? What do the manufacturer's instructions say? Typically you'd only need a dedicated circuit for something like this if it is big enough to warrant it, or if the mfg requires it. When I say big enough I mean 50% of the circuit size since you are combining a fixed in place ...


3

Orision, My take on this is that you understand what you want pretty well, and understand electricity only at a very surface level. That's not a great mix. My suggestion would be for you to do some googling on home automation products and see if you can come up with a way to set up a system that accomplishes this with off the shelf home automation products ...


3

Your question is so general that it can only be answered in generalities. Assuming you are referring to lights that are turned on at specific times, there are several methods. You can use a purely mechanical timer with cams that turn on switches that, then, turn on lights. One step up is an electrical timer run by a synchronous motor that also turns on ...


3

Aside from being a code violation of outrageous proportions, if this is 120VAC you would have the delightful condition that the light sockets were always hot/live - this can make changing a lightbulb into a shocking experience, and under the right conditions, also your last. You may also get some interesting magnetic effects from the loop wiring. Don't do ...


3

The National Electrical Code defines a Multi-wire branch circuit as follows. Branch Circuit, Multiwire. A branch circuit that consists of two or more ungrounded conductors that have a voltage between them, and a grounded conductor that has equal voltage between it and each ungrounded conductor of the circuit and that is connected to the neutral or ...


3

Bottom line is NO, you definitely cannot do what you propose. You CANNOT parallel a circuit like this of this size. It is expressly forbidden in the NEC, and could very well be a safety hazard. If the appliance takes two separate circuits like your old one that is a different story. Do you know what size and type of wire is feeding the old 30A circuits? ...


2

Steven - I am also in Vancouver, and just installed a new kitchen with permits and inspections. Yes, the gas range and hood can be on the same 15A circuit, as mine are. Just be sure that the oven is also gas, and does not have any electric broiler or electric self-clean. If the rating is under 12A you are fine. If you are splicing into an existing 15A ...


2

Assuming the electrical parts of the gas range are an oven lamp, igniters and some control circuitry it will not consume any significant amount of electricity. Therefore, plugging the vent fan into the same circuit should be fine. If you want a definitive answer you will need an ammeter. Good news is they are readily available for under $100. You do need an ...


2

While I don't necessarily like using plumbing as an analogy for electricity, it can be helpful in this situatuon. Think of a kitchen sink as an electrical device, or load. The supply lines are "hot", while the drain is "netural". The supply lines have pressure, which forces the water out of the tap. Once at the sink, the pressure is released. The water ...


2

Well, it's not electrical engineering just because it's magnets. I suppose an active version could be made, but there is this option: It doesn't appear to be available for purchase, but it doesn't look difficult to build.


2

First, you can only connect one wire to a screw. If you need to connect multiple, then you create a pigtail by cutting a short piece of wire and attaching one end to the screw, and the other end is connected to the other wires with a wire nut. Second, you need to figure out which cable provides the power to the box. Most likely it is the cable without the ...


2

Do not just install a 2 pole 50 amp Breaker. First your wire would need to be rated for the correct breaker. Second if the oven is rated at FLA (Full Load Amp) not to exceed 40 amps and there was a fault, the 50 amp breaker may not trip and could start a fire or kill someone. If you can wait look at Amazon, one quick search and there it was. Also look at a ...


2

You have a FPE panel, so why are you trying to put breakers in it? Just replace the entire panel, as the panel is telling you to...the fact you can't stick a breaker in easily should be a gigantic red flag that something is badly broken inside and you shouldn't bother trying to repair it!


1

Your first picture shows a diagram on the junction box, where two screwdrivers are prying in certain spots to get it open.


1

If the membrane buttons are on the circuit board, a new one might fix it. On the other hand it's an electronic device that's 19 years old. Assuming you can even get a replacement part, it will probably cost a significant percentage of just replacing the whole thing with a new unit (and typically the new unit will have a warranty period, while a replacement ...


1

Code may vary where you live Yes. You are going to create a "Shared Neutral" circuit. This isn't difficult or dangerous, but you should do some labeling in the panel and the box itself. First, it looks like the receptacle is a 30A/220V grounded receptacle (the wire itself may also be 30A -typical for an electric dryer- but that doesn't matter since you ...



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