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5

This sounds like a rather dangerous situation. The drywall installers no doubt did not install metal straps on the studs wherever an electrical wire crossed through the stud. Most likely a drywall screw or nail has gone into the stud and entered a wire that crossed the stud in the same place. The fix for this may require a professional electrician unless ...


4

1) You can have a GFI receptacle on either a 15 or 20A circuit. Keep in mind, areas like kitchens, bathrooms, laundry, etc, typically require 20A circuits for receptacles. For areas like outside and garages 20A circuits are always a good idea. 2) Either. You can have a GFI receptacle and feed everything downstream of it off the LOAD terminals protecting ...


4

The amp rating of the receptacle and circuit do not depend on whether the receptacle is a GFCI or not: If you have a 15 amp circuit, you must have 15 amp receptacles If you have a 20 amp circuit, you can either have 20 amp receptacles, or 15 amp receptacles if there is more than one (e.g. a duplex receptacle). It's not unusual to have a 20 amp GFCI in a ...


4

There are a couple of possibilities for how this could happen, but the simplest theory is that you failed to reconnect the wire feeding those outlets to the LOAD side terminals on the GFCIs. Turn the power off to the kitchen circuits and check in the GFCI-containing boxes for loose/unconnected wires. If you don't find anything in there, there are three ...


4

10 gauge wire can have a 30 amp breaker under the current National Electric Code. (and past ones too). Most places use the NEC, but some make changes. I do not have my book right here, but if needed I can get you the exact section in the code for that data. I am 'sure' he carries a current copy of the NEC with him, for reference. Aloysius is also ...


3

The problem is, whenever you turn one set of lights on, power can go through that shared light into the other circuit. So each switch controls all lights. While it -might- be possible to make 2 light groups (1 common light) work the way you want with two 4-way switches back-wired through each other, you're asking for something even more complicated. Each ...


3

It sounds like you have a bad connection or a broken wire somewhere upstream of your main breaker. Assuming that the power company's test were valid, then the problem would be the wire between your main breaker and the power meter. Other possibilities are that your main breaker is bad, or that the meter, meter box, or something upstream of that is broken. ...


3

They DO pass current through the switch and light at all times - just a few mA. The indicator is wired in parallel to the switch contacts. For most types of bulbs its not enough for the light to turn on. However with modern LED light bulbs these types of switches (as well as dimmers, and home automation switches) that dont use the neutral can cause the ...


3

The shaking probably shook a wire loose besides causing a leak, or the leak flooded over a set of wires and shorted the wire to the casing. The GFCI did it's job by detecting the short to ground and shutting down the power. trying to reconnect with the fault in place will then cause the GFCI to trip again. The dryer is protected by the same GFCI so when it ...


3

A parallel circuit is what you're referring to. In a series circuit, if one connection is broken, the entire circuit is broken.


3

Like @Petey said you need a different kind of tester, and one of those plug-in testers with the 3 lights is great for receptacles. Assuming all is properly grounded the tester is capable of indicating an open neutral. I would first confirm that an open neutral condition exist before you go any farther, and then understand that the problem (the bad ...


2

Many switches that need a neutral have equivalent versions from other brands that do not need a neutral. You may be able to find a switch that has the functionality you want without doing additional wiring. While current code requires a neutral at switches, you are allowed to replace existing switches without rewiring if the neutral is not present. If that ...


2

You are not using a "tester". You are using a voltage sensor. Big difference. You are getting a voltage reading but it's not working? This is almost certainly an open neutral on this circuit. A circuit needs both hot and neutral to work. Get yourself a real tester and test from hot to neutral and hot to ground anywhere possible. Find the open neutral and ...


2

You or your contractor have gone about this backwards. The first step is to determine your electrical requirements, including a reasonable amount of future expansion. Then you can size the wire & breaker together to meet those requirements.


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It all depends on several things. What size is the circuit? What else is one it? What do the manufacturer's instructions say? Typically you'd only need a dedicated circuit for something like this if it is big enough to warrant it, or if the mfg requires it. When I say big enough I mean 50% of the circuit size since you are combining a fixed in place ...


2

While I don't necessarily like using plumbing as an analogy for electricity, it can be helpful in this situatuon. Think of a kitchen sink as an electrical device, or load. The supply lines are "hot", while the drain is "netural". The supply lines have pressure, which forces the water out of the tap. Once at the sink, the pressure is released. The water ...


2

Well, it's not electrical engineering just because it's magnets. I suppose an active version could be made, but there is this option: It doesn't appear to be available for purchase, but it doesn't look difficult to build.


2

First, you can only connect one wire to a screw. If you need to connect multiple, then you create a pigtail by cutting a short piece of wire and attaching one end to the screw, and the other end is connected to the other wires with a wire nut. Second, you need to figure out which cable provides the power to the box. Most likely it is the cable without the ...


1

Steven - I am also in Vancouver, and just installed a new kitchen with permits and inspections. Yes, the gas range and hood can be on the same 15A circuit, as mine are. Just be sure that the oven is also gas, and does not have any electric broiler or electric self-clean. If the rating is under 12A you are fine. If you are splicing into an existing 15A ...


1

Assuming the electrical parts of the gas range are an oven lamp, igniters and some control circuitry it will not consume any significant amount of electricity. Therefore, plugging the vent fan into the same circuit should be fine. If you want a definitive answer you will need an ammeter. Good news is they are readily available for under $100. You do need an ...


1

The dimmer is blown, trying turning off the breaker and connecting the line and load for the chandelier(bypass the dimmer), and see what happens when you turn on the breaker. Most dimmer manufacturers recommend using a toggle switch to test new light fixtures, that way if there's a short you don't kill a good dimmer.


1

Wire from the panel to the closest outlet. Use Ratchet Freak's recommendation of using a GFCI since this has a potential to become a wet location. Put the GFCI at the first outlet location and wire the line/feed side of the outlet to the wire running from the panel. Add a second wire that will chain the second outlet to this outlet. On the GFCI, the ...


1

Based on the description you've provided in your comment. You should be able to install a combination GFCI switch device in the first bathroom, which will provide GFCI protection to the light and the rest of the circuit. Install the GFCI switch combo as follows: All grounding conductors left off for simplicity. Make sure all devices are properly grounded. ...


1

Imagine a ladder. This is a good representation of a parallel circuit. A lamp on any rung of the ladder will light but it is not required that any one of the rungs have a lamp working in order for the others to work.


1

Foam board should never be exposed, it should always covered with a fire retardant layer like drywall. So if it is installed correctly, your breaker box would never come in direct contact with the XPS and you don't have a problem. If it is exposed, then you have a larger problem then just the breaker box making contact with it.


1

If the breaker is tripping then either the breaker is faulty or the load is higher than the rated load of the breaker. The safe assumption is that the safety system is working correctly and the load really is too high. To do more research I would consider getting a load monitor -- Kill-A-Watt, for example -- and use it to see how much current each of those ...


1

Whether or not that's too much depends on what is plugged into the outlets, how often each item is used, and how many items are used together. That seems like far too many things on one breaker to me. If I was wiring that, I would not have done it that way. Now that it's already like that, fixing it is most likely a big chore. If, and that's a big, unlikely ...


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Should be doable with relay logic. Switch one powers the center top light and the coils of two relays that do the top left and right corners. Switch 2 powers the left-center 2 lights and the coils of two DIFFERENT relays that power the top and bottom left corners. Switch 3 (once you correct your diagram per comments) powers the bottom center light and the ...


1

Definitely sounds like either breakers/fuses/main power were left turned off, or he did something that caused breakers to trip or fuses to blow, or he damaged the wiring in some other way. Breaker/fuse box is the first thing to check. If that isn't it... he touched it last, he didn't get you to confirm that everything was working properly before he left, ...


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Interference The problem could be caused by Electromagnetic interference, or an attempt to filter the interference. Older Ground-fault circuit interrupting (GFCI) devices may be more susceptible to EMI related nuisance tripping. If you have an older GFCI device, you should first try replacing the GFCI device. Some fluorescent fixtures have an EMI/RFI ...



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