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5

This sounds like a rather dangerous situation. The drywall installers no doubt did not install metal straps on the studs wherever an electrical wire crossed through the stud. Most likely a drywall screw or nail has gone into the stud and entered a wire that crossed the stud in the same place. The fix for this may require a professional electrician unless ...


4

If you are showing hot on neutral this is an indication of an open neutral on the circuit with a load attached. You are reading the voltage on the neutral through the load. Find the open neutral and you'll find your solution. It could be anywhere in the circuit, from the panel through any box or outlet.


3

The problem is, whenever you turn one set of lights on, power can go through that shared light into the other circuit. So each switch controls all lights. While it -might- be possible to make 2 light groups (1 common light) work the way you want with two 4-way switches back-wired through each other, you're asking for something even more complicated. Each ...


3

A parallel circuit is what you're referring to. In a series circuit, if one connection is broken, the entire circuit is broken.


3

Like @Petey said you need a different kind of tester, and one of those plug-in testers with the 3 lights is great for receptacles. Assuming all is properly grounded the tester is capable of indicating an open neutral. I would first confirm that an open neutral condition exist before you go any farther, and then understand that the problem (the bad ...


2

Many switches that need a neutral have equivalent versions from other brands that do not need a neutral. You may be able to find a switch that has the functionality you want without doing additional wiring. While current code requires a neutral at switches, you are allowed to replace existing switches without rewiring if the neutral is not present. If that ...


2

You are not using a "tester". You are using a voltage sensor. Big difference. You are getting a voltage reading but it's not working? This is almost certainly an open neutral on this circuit. A circuit needs both hot and neutral to work. Get yourself a real tester and test from hot to neutral and hot to ground anywhere possible. Find the open neutral and ...


2

You or your contractor have gone about this backwards. The first step is to determine your electrical requirements, including a reasonable amount of future expansion. Then you can size the wire & breaker together to meet those requirements.


2

Amphibient's solution is perfect. However a couple of pointers. It is both illegal and unsafe to permanently cover up a junction box by, for instance, sheet rocking over it. This can cause endless problems if a wiring problem requires troubleshooting and if something should go wrong you might end up with a fire. Also the code requires a receptacle every ...


1

If the breaker is tripping then either the breaker is faulty or the load is higher than the rated load of the breaker. The safe assumption is that the safety system is working correctly and the load really is too high. To do more research I would consider getting a load monitor -- Kill-A-Watt, for example -- and use it to see how much current each of those ...


1

Whether or not that's too much depends on what is plugged into the outlets, how often each item is used, and how many items are used together. That seems like far too many things on one breaker to me. If I was wiring that, I would not have done it that way. Now that it's already like that, fixing it is most likely a big chore. If, and that's a big, unlikely ...


1

Should be doable with relay logic. Switch one powers the center top light and the coils of two relays that do the top left and right corners. Switch 2 powers the left-center 2 lights and the coils of two DIFFERENT relays that power the top and bottom left corners. Switch 3 (once you correct your diagram per comments) powers the bottom center light and the ...


1

Imagine a ladder. This is a good representation of a parallel circuit. A lamp on any rung of the ladder will light but it is not required that any one of the rungs have a lamp working in order for the others to work.


1

I'd agree with Keshlam, ask the local inspector about that specifically. It sounds to me like you don't plan on taking out a permit, which I would probably recommend, it gives you peace of mind knowing the job is done right, it's not very expensive, and you can tell the future homeowner when you sell that it was inspected and done to code. As for circuit ...


1

If the the AC power wires are connected to the receptacle using poke-in type connections then it is the possible source of your problem. The string of receptacles are wired in a string. The AC feed starts at one end and feeds the first. Then another run of wire daisy chains to the second receptacle. This repeats to the last one in the string. If you are ...


1

Definitely sounds like either breakers/fuses/main power were left turned off, or he did something that caused breakers to trip or fuses to blow, or he damaged the wiring in some other way. Breaker/fuse box is the first thing to check. If that isn't it... he touched it last, he didn't get you to confirm that everything was working properly before he left, ...


1

Interference The problem could be caused by Electromagnetic interference, or an attempt to filter the interference. Older Ground-fault circuit interrupting (GFCI) devices may be more susceptible to EMI related nuisance tripping. If you have an older GFCI device, you should first try replacing the GFCI device. Some fluorescent fixtures have an EMI/RFI ...


1

The bit about the light shutting off when the GFCI trips is very important, as it tells us that the light is connected to the load side of the GFCI outlet. What this means is the outlet is also protecting the light. This is a little overkill. It may be possible to connect it to the line side of the outlet with the other power wires. This should fix your ...


1

Get a wiring tester and verify the GFCI outlet is wired correctly. Swap out he 20A AFCI breaker for a standard 15A or 20A breaker and then see if the GFCI outlet works after that. Use a multimeter at the GFCI outlet to see if the voltage is in the expected range. Post photos of wiring at all locations so we can better help you.


1

The simple answer is that the breaker is tripping because two much current is flowing through it. Here's a list of some possible causes for over-current: Faulty wiring may be partly short-circuiting Faulty appliance is drawing too much current Too many devices on that circuit, in total drawing too much power I would start by proving to yourself that ...


1

The quickest and safest may be to check the resistance of the conductors with the power off, and determine the resistance it should be based on the material, length, and cross sectional area. Testing in various locations. Of course this requires some math, and guessing about the conductor length. Another quick way is to test for voltages with the power ...


1

You only need the one set plus the switch legs, so you really have two extra sets. It's impossible to say without knowing where and what they are going to, but more than likely the circuit is simply splitting off to feed different branches of the same circuit. You can safely connect all neutrals together and all grounds together. The live conductors are ...


1

If the 2 prong receptacles are existing receptacles, there shouldn't be a problem. As long as you realize the 2 prong receptacles will not have a ground, and you don't replace the 2 prong receptacles with 3 prong receptacles.


1

1(A) In the US most general lighting circuits are rated for 15 amperes, though general receptacle outlets are typically either 15 or 20 amperes. 1(B) Calculating the wattage a circuit can safely supply is done using a simple formula. Voltage * Current * Safety Factor = Wattage 80% is a common safety factor used to insure circuits are not constantly ...



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