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8

It is generally not acceptable to have wire junctions be inaccessible. The rule of thumb is: All junctions must be in a box, but that box must be accessible - you cannot legally close a box up behind drywall. There are some limited exceptions, as noted here. You should run a new line if you don't have the slack.


5

The basic problem is that the occupancy switch that you chose to purchase is one designed to be able to work in series with the load attached to it. If the attached load is too small (too low of wattage) the switch assembly does not get enough power to operate correctly. For the particular model you have this is on the order of 40 to 50 watts of minimum ...


4

If you are showing hot on neutral this is an indication of an open neutral on the circuit with a load attached. You are reading the voltage on the neutral through the load. Find the open neutral and you'll find your solution. It could be anywhere in the circuit, from the panel through any box or outlet.


3

Short answer: NO. Long answer: All splices must be in a junction box, and the junction box must be accessible. Caveat: There are some products that can be used to splice behind drywall outside of a box. See this answer here: http://diy.stackexchange.com/a/4535/928 But, I think it's preferable to fish a new line.


3

'Heat Trace' is a subject of replenishing the rate of 'Heat Loss' taking place from the hot surfaces to be kept heated for the specific needs at required temperatures. These heat loss surfaces are generally 'thermally insulated' to reduce the rate of heat loss taking place, and this prevents around 80% to 85% heat loss rate occurring. 'Heat Trace' function ...


2

DMoore is spot on about using the 3-way occupancy sensor, but off a bit about needing to replace both switches with occupancy sensors. The occupancy sensor installation instructions should show how to connect the device to a 3-way circuit, without replacing the other switch. Here is an example wiring diagram from the Lutron Maestro Occupancy Sensing ...


2

Amphibient's solution is perfect. However a couple of pointers. It is both illegal and unsafe to permanently cover up a junction box by, for instance, sheet rocking over it. This can cause endless problems if a wiring problem requires troubleshooting and if something should go wrong you might end up with a fire. Also the code requires a receptacle every ...


2

In my opinion, the best option for you is also the most efficient: Use LED based set lighting. The LED based lights use power regulators to generate the 3V needed for each individual LED "lamp," and those regulators (typically switching buck controllers) are usually very tolerant to fluctuations in power. LEDs also have excellent life spans, don't typically ...


2

Many switches that need a neutral have equivalent versions from other brands that do not need a neutral. You may be able to find a switch that has the functionality you want without doing additional wiring. While current code requires a neutral at switches, you are allowed to replace existing switches without rewiring if the neutral is not present. If that ...


1

The simple answer is that the breaker is tripping because two much current is flowing through it. Here's a list of some possible causes for over-current: Faulty wiring may be partly short-circuiting Faulty appliance is drawing too much current Too many devices on that circuit, in total drawing too much power I would start by proving to yourself that ...


1

The quickest and safest may be to check the resistance of the conductors with the power off, and determine the resistance it should be based on the material, length, and cross sectional area. Testing in various locations. Of course this requires some math, and guessing about the conductor length. Another quick way is to test for voltages with the power ...


1

You only need the one set plus the switch legs, so you really have two extra sets. It's impossible to say without knowing where and what they are going to, but more than likely the circuit is simply splitting off to feed different branches of the same circuit. You can safely connect all neutrals together and all grounds together. The live conductors are ...


1

Given that you state that "no power flows to the room" when you use a normal breaker, the most likely explanation is either that there is a short/arc somewhere, or the wiring is incorrect. Shorts/arcs are not something to be messing around with. I would call in a professional.


1

1(A) In the US most general lighting circuits are rated for 15 amperes, though general receptacle outlets are typically either 15 or 20 amperes. 1(B) Calculating the wattage a circuit can safely supply is done using a simple formula. Voltage * Current * Safety Factor = Wattage 80% is a common safety factor used to insure circuits are not constantly ...


1

Can't create energy unfortunately... The voltage drops because of Ohm's Law. In your case: Voltage droop in power line = square-root of power used times the resistance in the power line If you see the lights dim occasionally, at those moments, there is too much load on the line. Your only solution, conceptually, is to add more energy to the ...



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