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14

Not an uncommon problem. I have had a lot of problems with GFI's the last few years myself. There are a few likely causes: A fault still exists and will not allow the GFI to reset. The GFI tripped due to an overload and the differential circuit was damaged, thus the outlet is now toast. This seems to be a common complaint with standard 15 amp GFIC's. they ...


8

To directly answer your question about the unused switch in your kitchen, you have to check a couple of things before you install a receptacle in it's place: Is there a source voltage feed in the box? If there is only one cable entering the box and both the black and white conductors are connected to the switch(es), then the voltage feed is coming through ...


8

It is generally not acceptable to have wire junctions be inaccessible. The rule of thumb is: All junctions must be in a box, but that box must be accessible - you cannot legally close a box up behind drywall. There are some limited exceptions, as noted here. You should run a new line if you don't have the slack.


7

A GFCI is a good idea because of the location of the outlet. However, I don't think that a GFCI that can simultaneously protect two circuits even exists (and I doubt one would fit into a single-gang box if it did exist), so I believe you have a couple of options: Install GFCI breakers on the dishwasher and disposal circuits, and use a regular outlet under ...


7

I will echo TomG's sentiment: Yikes! By using the BX as the "neutral/ground" (really it's just the neutral; a three-prong 220v plug is considered ungrounded regardless of the continuity that should exist between neutral and ground), whenever the A/C is on, the armor of the cable is energized. It will have a lower voltage than the "hot" because the A/C is ...


7

i am not an electrician but I do know federal pacific went out of business years ago after it was found that their boxes were responsible for a number of fires. Change the entire panel just to be safe. keeping the federal pacific panel is asking for a trouble.


7

REPLACE THIS PANEL NOW Your panel almost certainly is suffering from breaker-to-busbar contact damage, rendering it a ticking incendiary device. See this answer for the gory details on just what is wrong with FPE's "breakers". If you post a picture of your panel (dead front off), I can determine if you can have your electrician install one of the Eaton ...


6

It sounds you caused a short circuit by wiring the hot and neutral together. You created a circuit with no electrical resistance so the breaker pops to prevent you from melting the wires and burning down your house. Cap each wire that you removed separately unless they were already joined together. Once the outlet is removed and everything is safely capped ...


6

If you're referring to the circuit breaker switch being in the middle after it's been tripped, that's just the "tripped" position. As far as I know it doesn't tell you anything about the reason. You have arc fault breakers, which means the breaker was tripped because: there was too much current flowing there was an arc fault. Based on the relatively low ...


5

The basic problem is that the occupancy switch that you chose to purchase is one designed to be able to work in series with the load attached to it. If the attached load is too small (too low of wattage) the switch assembly does not get enough power to operate correctly. For the particular model you have this is on the order of 40 to 50 watts of minimum ...


5

My guess is that it stands for Uniform Fire Code Listed and means that all components in the circuit have been tested to conform to the Uniform Fire Code, i.e. NFPA 1. (I'm extrapolating from a UL or CULUS listing meaning that a product has been tested to the appropriate UL standard.) Since the National Electrical Code is part of the NFPA standards, that ...


5

Important factor here: your photo shows that you have an arc-fault circuit interrupter. That means that there's a second condition besides total amperage that can trip the circuit. Particularly if this happened at the same time that a light burned out or you turned one on / off, the arc sensor could trip the breaker. A breaker that is halfway between the on ...


5

Yikes! I am not an electrician, but I would run new 10/3 BX. Your jury-rigged system might work, but it has the capacity to electrocute someone, or maybe start a fire, if anything goes wrong. Possible issues include the BX armor being hot if a fault somehow occurs where it's connected to the neutral bus or overloading one of the hot wires if one of ...


5

This sounds like a rather dangerous situation. The drywall installers no doubt did not install metal straps on the studs wherever an electrical wire crossed through the stud. Most likely a drywall screw or nail has gone into the stud and entered a wire that crossed the stud in the same place. The fix for this may require a professional electrician unless ...


4

The two branch circuit breakers will trip if the load on their protected circuit is greater than 32 amperes, and 25 amperes respectively. However, since the main breaker trips at 40 amperes. If both branch circuits are pulling a full load the branch circuit breakers will not trip, but the combination of the loads will trip the main breaker (32 + 25 = 57 > 40 ...


4

You simply need to convert the outlet into a junction box: Flip the circuit breaker off Unscrew the hots, neutrals, and ground from the outlet and remove the outlet Splice the hot, neutral, and ground from both sides (charge and load) and put wire nuts on Cover the box with a junction box lid Flip the circuit back on That way the receptacle continues ...


4

Replace Capacitors in LCD TV Power Supply I would suspect that the problem is within the LCD TV. The power supplies inside LCD TVs and LCD monitors use cheap electrolytic capacitors that go bad and cause problems with the device. Your symptoms are representative of the TV power supply just starting to go bad. Small amounts of transient noise on the AC power ...


4

If you are showing hot on neutral this is an indication of an open neutral on the circuit with a load attached. You are reading the voltage on the neutral through the load. Find the open neutral and you'll find your solution. It could be anywhere in the circuit, from the panel through any box or outlet.


4

They DO pass current through the switch and light at all times - just a few mA. The indicator is wired in parallel to the switch contacts. For most types of bulbs its not enough for the light to turn on. However with modern LED light bulbs these types of switches (as well as dimmers, and home automation switches) that dont use the neutral can cause the ...


4

1) You can have a GFI receptacle on either a 15 or 20A circuit. Keep in mind, areas like kitchens, bathrooms, laundry, etc, typically require 20A circuits for receptacles. For areas like outside and garages 20A circuits are always a good idea. 2) Either. You can have a GFI receptacle and feed everything downstream of it off the LOAD terminals protecting ...


4

The amp rating of the receptacle and circuit do not depend on whether the receptacle is a GFCI or not: If you have a 15 amp circuit, you must have 15 amp receptacles If you have a 20 amp circuit, you can either have 20 amp receptacles, or 15 amp receptacles if there is more than one (e.g. a duplex receptacle). It's not unusual to have a 20 amp GFCI in a ...


4

There are a couple of possibilities for how this could happen, but the simplest theory is that you failed to reconnect the wire feeding those outlets to the LOAD side terminals on the GFCIs. Turn the power off to the kitchen circuits and check in the GFCI-containing boxes for loose/unconnected wires. If you don't find anything in there, there are three ...


4

10 gauge wire can have a 30 amp breaker under the current National Electric Code. (and past ones too). Most places use the NEC, but some make changes. I do not have my book right here, but if needed I can get you the exact section in the code for that data. I am 'sure' he carries a current copy of the NEC with him, for reference. Aloysius is also ...


4

The short answer is that the breaker protects the wire (otherwise, heat and fire can result). You can put a 20A breaker on a circuit if all the wire on the circuit is #12. If any of the wire is #14 you can put a 15A breaker on it. If any of the wire in the circuit is smaller than #14, then you cannot put a 15A breaker on it.


4

It is okay to have 800 amps of breakers in a 200 amp service panel. The reason there is a main breaker (200 amp double pole) is to prevent unsafe usage. When you run out of physical space, there are several solutions: Replace some of the main panel breakers with half-widths (two breakers per slot) to create enough space for a new breaker. Install a ...


3

'Heat Trace' is a subject of replenishing the rate of 'Heat Loss' taking place from the hot surfaces to be kept heated for the specific needs at required temperatures. These heat loss surfaces are generally 'thermally insulated' to reduce the rate of heat loss taking place, and this prevents around 80% to 85% heat loss rate occurring. 'Heat Trace' function ...


3

Simple answer to your question is: All load fixtures must be wired in parallel, never in series. This means you need to feed each fixture with 120vac. You can use a single run of wire, but the feed to the next fixture must be wired so that the hot and neutral are always connected uninterrupted to each fixture. Practically speaking, the black hot wire coming ...


3

There are 2 situations where the main breaker could trip before the branch breakers: As others have mentioned, the main is sized less than the sum of the branches; if all the branches pull heavy loads, you can exceed the main without exceeding the branches, and the main will trip. If this is the cause, you can; Accept the overload, and be ready to flip ...


3

Typically your master breaker is sized to be less then the sum of all of the sub breakers. The reason for this is in a typical house, you don't pull the maximum current from all branches at once. However, this setup does allow for the situation that you are running into where your master breaker can trip even though none of the sub breakers have tripped. ...



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