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2

Well usually when "half" of something dies in residential electrical, it means one hot leg is down. This could be an issue at the transformer, the wiring to your meter, the meter itself, the wiring from the meter to your main panel, the main breaker or a fault within your panel. It is pretty easy to test for, you're just looking for 240v at the service ...


1

Check for a tripped (or faulty) GFCI outlet. If power is being fed through it, then you'd see your results.


1

Call a friend and have them come help you. Tell them to bring a cell phone. They will go from room to room and floor to floor with you on the phone, as you switch off each breaker one by one. When the power goes off in the room they are in, mark on your electrical panel which breaker/fuse you pushed and confirm what room your friend is in. No matter the ...


1

Addressing your points in turn: 1) Handle ties do not make a BR breaker pair common trip (2-pole BR breakers have an internal common trip mechanism) -- see footnote 2 on page 84 of Eaton's catalog. 2) Common trips are generally used in 240VAC circuits -- while what the previous installer did with the pump circuit is not wrong as per the 2014 NEC ...


3

It is NOT okay to have a 20A circuit breaker on a circuit that has any 14 gauge wire. If there's any #14 wire anywhere downstream, you must use a 15A breaker to protect that wire. It's about fire prevention. #14 wire is rated for 15A. Sure, it will carry more, but the N.E.C. ampacity ratings take into account the resistance of the wire insulation to heat ...


0

If you had a short from a hot to ground (screw through some wires) and an open ground (broken connection somewhere), then fixing the ground could result in a circuit breaker tripping. If that were the case, you'd see voltage on the ground. But since you're fixing the ground at a fixture, and I'm assuming you didn't do anything like a bootleg ground to ...


0

Sounds to me like a coincidence. Grounds have nothing to do with the functionality of a circuit breaker. Meaning a circuit will work properly (albeit less safely) with or without a ground. The ground is a "safety backup" in case of a short circuit to metallic parts and pieces. Hopefully all the work you did on the sconces is proper. Did you install and ...


-2

Even if the baby was shocked, there would be nothing to do about it now. If it did not wake up, then it's a safe bet there were no psychological effects. Lucky you weren't standing in a puddle of water when that happened or you would be dead and your finger would just be a black stump made out of charcoal. People who get electrocuted generally do not ...


2

No need to worry about you or your son, but the lamps were obviously done wrong, or at the very least the work was extremely shoddy. Have them re-done by someone who knows what they are doing in your area.


0

If you at all worried about making such a connection it would be best to call a qualified electrician, or power box expert (or what ever you might call that type of person on your side of the pond). Placing an amp clamp over the single main insulated wire might be enough with possibly just some small error amount.


2

There should be a breaker or fuse somewhere, even if there is no single main. There HAS to be a way to shut it off. Thing is, yes, there is a way to hack a job like this so bad that there is no breaker. If not then someone catastrophically messed up. Are you 100% sure there is not another panel or disconnect somewhere?


4

If there's no main breaker, then there is probably another breaker box somewhere, possibly in the same enclosure as the meter. Also, it's possible that the panel you are looking at does not have a main breaker at the top; it could be one of the breakers mixed in with the branch circuit breakers. If you can, post a picture of your breaker panel with the ...


0

No breaker and no master switch in the breaker box would be against code in my jurisdiction. There must be a way to shut off power to the circuit without your electrical company having to shut it off. What is your jurisdiction?


2

I would find some way to attach the measuring clamp around the live feed near the meter. My house, as many do, has an external wall-box flush-mounted into an external brick wall. It used to look like this Mine is a bit unusual in that the supply is three-phase rather than the more usual single-phase but the general layout is the same. At bottom left ...


0

Before unscrewing any screws on the fusebox, turn off the electricity! But even before doing that make sure you've got a torch handy, 'cos fuseboxes are invariably in dark places (a head-torch is useful).


0

I just had the same problem. The power company came out and discovered their line went bad underground, and only 1 of the 2 cables coming into the house had power at the meter.


3

Many devices will draw a slightly larger load at startup, especially if there are motors involved (ie. fridge/freezer compressors). But even computers will draw more at startup due to all of the devices initializing. Likely you are very close to the max capacity of that breaker, and on startup you are exceeding it hence why it trips. The way to resolve ...


3

The purpose of fuses is not to protect your appliances. The purpose of fuses is to keep your wiring from starting a fire and burning down your house. If your wiring is up to code the fuse will blow long before the wiring has an issue. By reducing the amperage of your fuse you are simply setting yourself up for more headaches and costs from un-necessarily ...


6

Should you? No, of course not. Most electronics should already have a suitable fuse installed. In some things (kettle leads, extension cables) these fuses are rated high because the end load is unknown. Can you reduce them? Sure. If you feel something requires extra protection from surges or feel it has been incorrectly rated, you can lower the fuse to the ...


8

Originally, in the UK after BS1363 was introduced, there were 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 13A fuses but nowadays mostly 3,5 and 13 are used/available. The plug fuse is to protect the wire between plug and appliance, it is not primarily intended to protect the appliance (which can have it's own fuse or other protections). So the choice of fuse principally ...


2

No, that's not at all how it works. This feeder will provide 60A @ 240V. That is 60A on each leg of the panel, NOT 30A on each. The 60A is available, you use what you need up to roughly 60A, again, on each leg. A residential panel will be hard pressed to be fully balanced, or greatly imbalanced, due to the transient nature of usage.


1

Depends on how the panel is wired. Domestic North American panels have each side wired in an A-B-A-B arrangement, so all the circuits on the left side do draw from both feeds. But each (electrical) side is still independent, so you cannot draw more than the master breaker's rating on either bus. 240V / 60A usually means you have 2 x 120v feeds, each one up ...


0

No, you would overload one leg and the circuit breaker would trip. There is no self-balancing. You should balance the load for average use. Obviously it is impossible to keep balanced 100% of the time as you use different devices.



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