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2

You'll need a double-pole GFCI breaker, wired like so: What you have described is a multiwire branch circuit. Because the neutral is shared, the overcurrent protection device(s) (in your case the two separate breakers) must be able to trip together. This can be remedied by installing a double-pole breaker, or by handle-tying two individual breakers. ...


2

This is perfectly FINE. In fact, many commercial panels do not have knockouts and have to be ordered FULL of breakers, even if many of them are not being used. I would however replace that bad GFI breaker with a standard piece. For a few bucks this ensures it will never even be considered to be used.


4

National Electrical Code simply states that all openings must be closed. An unused breaker or cover likely both meet that requirement, so either should be fine. I don't think there's a rule that says "Thou shalt not leave unused breakers in thine panel.". But I could be mistaken. Remove and discard the bad breaker. National Electrical Code 2014 ...


3

Indeed, a range is another name for a freestanding electric oven/cooktop combination. As to your tripping problem -- random trips on different circuits with no sign of an overload is a sign that the breaker panel busbars are on their way out, and trying to burn your house down in the process. Get a good electrician (or three) in there to get the panel ...


10

A "Range" is a freestanding combination oven/cooktop device.


4

Just to give you a rough idea of what a load calculation would look like, here's a quick rundown. General Lighting This one is easy. You just take the square footage of the building (to the outside of the wall), and multiply by 3 volt-amperes (VA). Branch Circuits Required Next, for each required branch circuit, add 1,500 VA. So if there's a kitchen, ...


1

I would double check how you are using your circuit finder. I use circuit finders all the time. They can be quite sensitive and can register on multiple breakers at the same time. That might explain why it led you to the wrong breaker. What I do to scan the panel is first I drag the finder across all the breakers. If it beeps on multiple ones, I try again ...


1

Too small a temperature swing on the thermostat can cause this issue as well. Many electronic thermostats have an adjustable temperature swing of 0.5, 1, 2 degrees. If this value is set too low and the compressor is restarted too soon (less than 10-15 minutes) after a cycle, it can trip a breaker as the compressor struggles to start against a pressurized ...


7

Certainly sounds like you have a wire/outlet that is connected to two different circuits, given your symptoms. First - when dealing with something whacky like this, just shut off the main breaker if you need to, say, cut it. If it's still hot with the main off, you have some really interesting wiring going on. And if, for some reason that should never ...



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