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4

The short answer is that the breaker protects the wire (otherwise, heat and fire can result). You can put a 20A breaker on a circuit if all the wire on the circuit is #12. If any of the wire is #14 you can put a 15A breaker on it. If any of the wire in the circuit is smaller than #14, then you cannot put a 15A breaker on it.


2

It doesn't sound like a short. It happens after five minutes... each time. To me it also sounds like loose wiring or a bad breaker. I would turn the circuit off and than I would visually inspect the back of the receptacle first. Are the screws tight? Any burnt looking wires anywhere in the box? Than if that is good I would switch that breaker out for a ...


2

There is obviously something wrong, and I highly doubt it is the breaker. You can view the wiring in the panel by turning off the main breaker and unscrewing the cover plate. You will see something like this: As you can see, there is not much opportunity for a short, however, if the wires are touching somehow and burnt, then it could be a short. You could ...


0

What type of breaker do you have? I have experienced a similar issue with circuits protected by GFCI breakers. It could be bad wiring or it could be a light fixture that has a short of some type or it could just be the GFCI breaker. Id try everything prior to rewiring!


1

There is no need to worry about who manufactured your breaker. Siemens and SquareD are two of the larger manufacturers. In fact there is likely to be no difference as long as both are labeled as type QP. Your panel has a label on it which will tell you what type of breaker is required. For instance mine tells me to use type C or BR. The physical ...


1

Another possibility is that there's too much bare wire exposed, and the act of inserting the plug is pushing the whole outlet enough to cause a short. Again, you'd need to turn off power, confirm that it has been turned off, and open thing up to check... and if you're going to do that much work putting ina new outlet only adds a few bucks. Or you could put ...


3

Let's start with what it likely is NOT: You plugged in multiple devices and they all trip the breaker. Therefore, it's very unlikely a bad device is shorting out the circuit. A phone charger, tablet etc. draws such tiny amps, it's very unlikely you're overloading the circuit. It's possible you have a bad breaker or other issue. But, also unlikely since ...


1

Are you 100% certain that it blows when the thermostat opens the call for cooling circuit to shut it down? Or, does it run for a good while, shut down, and then you notice that the fuse is blown? If I were you, before going down that rabbit hole I would put one more fuse in it, run it for 5 minutes or less, shut it down from the tstat yourself, and see if ...


2

You'll need: NEMA 14-50 receptacle. 40 ampere double pole breaker Four 8 AWG copper conductors, or four 6 AWG aluminum conductors (Hot, Hot, Neutral, Ground). It's common for builders to use a 50 ampere breaker and larger conductors, to make sure the circuit can handle any range the owner's might use. But if you're installing the circuit to support a ...


1

The install guide for the oven lists a 40 amp circuit.



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