Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

As an ex electrician I have real problems with this situation. 1) All devices on branch circuits say lights, radio etc plug in to wall receptacles rated at 15 Amps. 2) You say the circuit feeding these lights is 20 Amps. This does not provide the necessary protection for the light and receptacle. If the wiring IS 12 gauge the wiring would be ok but the ...


0

In this particular case, the black wire WAS NOT getting triggered by the switch. For the fixtures in question, the red wire needed to connect to the Black fixture wire, while the black wires were the "extra hot leg" that needed to be capped off separately.


4

Yes, you wired it wrong. :) The red wire is another hot leg. This is a common installation when the electrician is providing wires for a ceiling fan with lights (to be independently switched). The red wire shares a common neutral with the black wire, hence the three white wires. You should keep the white wires connected. Disconnect the red wire and cap ...


0

Sorry for the slow response, but when in the process of taking out the breakers to investigate the bus bar I figured out what was going on and it took me a few days to confirm it. The two bad breakers were in the same row of my sub panel, and it dawned on me that if one the lines from the main panel that feeds sub panel was bad, that could be causing my ...


1

Any electrician who looks at this would consider that subpanel 'maxed out' ... Not necessarily due to the technicalities of the code to squeeze another circuit or two in with complex tandems but because of the amount of wire packed into that small box and the extreme of things taken to extremes - meaning the multitude of tandem breakers. Generally tandems ...


1

Buy cheap night lights in bulk (less than $2 each), plug one into each outlet & turn them on, then all you have to do is turn off one circuit breaker at a time and walk around the house writing down what lights are off for that corresponding circuit breaker. Dollartree.com & Opentip.com sell large quantities from $1.10 to $2 each.


0

The breaker was not tripped but I did flip all the breakers off and on a couple times to be sure. Based on this and other comments, it sounds more like an open somewhere in the circuit and not a short. The other possibility is maybe (big emphasis on maybe) a bad breaker that didn't trip for a short. Here's some good reading about this subject Half ...


1

The new breaker isn't unsafe, the old one is. The old breaker--which I presume is still powering the original circuit--is still providing electricity to a circuit which appears to have a problem hidden somewhere in one of your walls. To be completely safe, shut off the old breaker (which will, unfortunately, also shut off power to everything else that is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included