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A location that requires combination arc fault protection and gfci protection needs both. CAFCI breakers do not provide the gfci protection required by the NEC. A gfci needs to open the circuit with a ground fault between 4 mA to 6mA to provide the required protection. A cafci may not react at this level read the specifications to see if yours does.


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Nuisance trips are generally easier to reset at a receptacle than in the breaker box.


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While I'm sure the cost seems prohibitive, it might be time to start thinking about changing out the panel. If the breakers are known to fail closed, you could end up watching your home burn to the ground (hopefully from the outside).


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We are talking about garage and outdoor receptacles. These are both required to be GFCI protected. It is extremely easy to trip a GFI if you are working on the circuit live. Simply touching the neutral to ground, or even testing from hot to ground can trip them. You have a tripped GFI somewhere, you need to find it. Could be nearly anywhere; garage, ...


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If the above excellent answers don't work.... The three outlets may be daisy chained, and one may have internally failed, or a wire connection loosened...effecting it like a chain of old school Christmas tree bulbs.


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Sometimes breakers can die if they are overloaded. (They aren't supposed to —they're supposed to trip—but not everything works perfectly forever.) Go to the main breaker box and test all the breakers to see if any of them has no voltage on the output side. (Or shut off the main disconnect and test them all for continuity.) P.s. I assume you have no sub ...


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The only way to test a circuit breaker is to present it with various loads and see how quickly it pops, and measure whether that matches the formal specifications for that breaker. Theoretically, the folks selling refurbs SHOULD have done exactly that testing, and the manufacturers should have done so at least on samples from the production line... so this ...


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Each circuit is rated 20 amperes. Handles are typically tied together when all the breakers are supplying a single piece of equipment. For example, in a 120/240 volt single phase system, two breakers might be tied together for a piece of equipment that requires 240 volts. Three breakers tied together would be common for a 3 phase systems. In all ...


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There are several reasons for having two-pole breakers, or handle-tied breakers. 240V circuits or multi-wire branch circuits (shared neutral) both require two-pole breakers. The amperage of a breaker is what's on the handle. You DO NOT add up the numbers. A single pole 20A breaker is (for residential in the US at least) a 20A/120V breaker. A two-pole 20A ...


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3.15A is indeed an appropriate value for a BUSS GMA 5x20mm fuse. Chances are something else is blown out. If you're not up to doing component level troubleshooting, probably a board will have to be replaced. One part that frequently takes the brunt of power surges is MOV (varistor) devices, which look like big (often red or blue) ceramic disk capacitors. ...


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In response to TDHofstetter's comment, I opened the thermal cutoff: The 14-3 cable (on the bottom of the picture) is coming from the panel. The black wire terminates all by itself (on the left). The red (coming from the same breaker) runs through the cutoff and to the black wire in the armored cable that proceeds to the boiler controller. The ground and ...


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If that is the red and black from the same 14/3 cable it is anyone's guess why they did this. In any case they are using the same circuit on both wires, obviously. If there is no problem at this time just splice the two wires to a tail of the same gauge and put that one tail on the breaker. Those GE breakers are NOT made to accept two conductors, but it's ...



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