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4

This happens because of the common color codes for multi-wire cables. xx/2 cable is Black, White, and Bare. xx/3 cable is Black, Red, White and Bare. A 240V (only) load like a water heater only needs 2 conductors. So they use the /2 cable, which is Black, White and Bare. However they are both "hot", so white is the incorrect color. The rules ...


3

The white wire is being used as an ungrounded (hot) conductor, though it has not been properly marked as such. Looks like a fairly large wire, so it's surely feeding a larger 240 volt load. The breaker that it's terminated at, should be a double pole breaker, and is likely rated 50 amperes (check handle label for rating). The load being supplied by this ...


4

The answer is No. brhans, guess is correct. Many water heaters are wired this way because there are no neutral's in a standard 240V water heater. The white wire needs at least 6" of other than white or green identification some inspectors want everything in the box identified (taped or painted). Black is the most common color using tape but, it can be ...


0

Motor starting loads (its the compressor motor in your A/C drawing all the current) can be very high and it is normal for them to briefly exceed the continuous rating of their circuit including the breaker. If breakers were designed to open with more sensitively, with that kind of load they would nuisance trip all the time.


0

Sounds like you have skinned a hot wire that is touching the metal box or one of the ground wires. With the power off pull the switches and look for a burned spot. If the wire is still ok not damaged from shorting it can be taped with a quality electrical tape. If the wire is damaged you will want to cut it and pigtail a new piece. This happens even to ...


3

On 50A circuits, the rule is one breaker - one homerun - one outlet (NEC 210.23) The only exception is circuits which supply only cooking appliances (210.23C). If you want to use two devices on one circuit, unplug the one you're not using and plug in the one you are. It may be legal to feed two outlets with 2 breakers in a sub-panel. However I would think ...


2

As long as the ungrounded (hot) conductors of the circuit are fed by different legs of the service, then there's no problem with the wiring. According to modern codes, the breakers need to at least have a handle tie. However, since the installation presumably predates the code, it does not have to be changed (unless you're doing work that requires it). If ...


0

It seems to me, after reading all the stuff in your first question and on here that the problem is inside your cloths dryer. There is a good chance that some part of the heater coil is becoming shorted out and causing huge amounts of current to flow when the coil becomes hot. The probable reason that it is the main breaker that trips is due to that breaker ...


1

Your panel uses type BR breakers -- these are currently made by Eaton. The time-current curves are available here.


2

I just followed the link. The trip values for the breakers are the numbers on the handles. You have at least 3 different sizes in your panel the red, blue & black (the top left one is the main 240V 100A) the blue and reds are the 120V 15 amp & 20 amp the top right is a 240V and there should be a number on the handle that is its amperage. The numbers ...



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