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4

Yes, it seems quite probable that there was an electric water heater at some point, and if the last two were gas, that circuit is probably unused. Leave it off, and check for anything not working; and/or follow the wires if visible, or look for a junction box near the water heater location that has a cable going in and no wire coming out.


0

Grab a cheap $2 single pole toggle switch from a local hardware store just to make sure it's not your dimmer. If not check all your wiring using the utmost common sense and precaution, wear leather gloves if needed, turn off the power from the breaker, test the line again with a fluke tester (very cheap $5-$8, I suggest you buy one if you're going to do ...


1

The dimmer is blown, trying turning off the breaker and connecting the line and load for the chandelier(bypass the dimmer), and see what happens when you turn on the breaker. Most dimmer manufacturers recommend using a toggle switch to test new light fixtures, that way if there's a short you don't kill a good dimmer.


1

Was the motor replaced with the same size (horsepower, amperage, voltage) motor? What is the amperage and voltage listed on the motor's data plate? In many cases the motor plate will either list the size of the required breaker, or if not, the manufacturers website will have that information available. If you "had the motor changed" it might be best to call ...


3

It sounds like you have a bad connection or a broken wire somewhere upstream of your main breaker. Assuming that the power company's test were valid, then the problem would be the wire between your main breaker and the power meter. Other possibilities are that your main breaker is bad, or that the meter, meter box, or something upstream of that is broken. ...


0

How do you measure the voltage? Do you use a resistor or just touch the leads with a volt meter? If there is not resistive load in the circuit the voltage might just be floating. Does the voltage drop faster to normal from 1 kV when you measure over e.g. light bulb? You could measure the phase difference between the voltage or current. They should be in the ...


1

Perhaps. It depends on exactly what you have for a breaker box now and what it's rated for. It also depends on your current loads and capacity. Some (but not all) boxes are rated for "twin" breakers, where one slot is occupied by a breaker that has two separate handles and two separate output terminals, since it is two separate breakers in one single slot ...


1

If your panel can take more half-height (sometimes known as "cheater" or "tandem") circuit breakers, you can replace two existing 120V breakers (on the same phase!) with a tandem pair of half-height breakers; this will then free up a slot in your panel that you can then use for a full-height 240V double pole breaker. If your panel does not accept tandem ...


0

The wiring looks normal. However, you said "20 amp breaker". The wires look like 14ga, which is 15 amps max. How powerful is the outdoor floodlight? >1000 watts and it's likely the cause. Assuming the floodlight is under 1000 watts, does the breaker trip immediately, or after a few minutes? Breakers do get weaker as they age, try replacing the breaker.


1

Okay, a few caveats first. The two single phase circuit breakers are to be identical in the following aspects: Manufacturer Ampacity (30A, 40A, etc) Approximate age Known good Same size on all faces Furthermore, I believe the following should be observed: The circuit breakers being joined must not be adjacent to empty slots (the tie bar may try to ...


1

For this to work, the two single breakers must pull power off each bus leg to give you 240VAC. If they pull off the same leg, you only get 120VAC (parallel feed). Check to make sure they use alternate bus connections when they're side-by-side. If the breaker handles have a hole, I've seen a cut nail used to link them. They must be linked so both legs shut ...


0

Why would you even bother? Handle ties are just a convenience item. They will not turn two single-pole breakers into a common-trip double pole breaker. Stick a piece of tape over the two breakers, to make it clear where they are, for the short period of time until you get a proper 2-pole breaker.


0

Foam board should never be exposed, it should always covered with a fire retardant layer like drywall. So if it is installed correctly, your breaker box would never come in direct contact with the XPS and you don't have a problem. If it is exposed, then you have a larger problem then just the breaker box making contact with it.


0

Heat is a byproduct of energy use. The electrical panel should not be generating heat in normal circumstances and doing so would be symptomatic of a hazardous condition. Thus, it is normal to insulate around an electrical panel.



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