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6

You should never, EVER put a space heater (or other high-draw appliance) on a plug strip!! Even thought they are rated for a certain amperage or wattage, most are cheaply made and cannot handle the load of a single high-draw appliance. It's not that they will definitely fail, but unfortunately your experience is not at all uncommon. What happened to yours ...


3

Breakers do not trip right away. Whether they trip depends on how far over their rated capacity the current is and how long the current has been going for. This behavior is documented in a circuit breaker trip curve for your specific breakers, which gives a range of times for a specific current amount. E.g. in that example, a current of 3x the rated current ...


6

If a breaker is tripping regularly, that's a serious problem you should look at. That is not normal or acceptable. It means something is wrong with your overcurrent protection, or a defective device actually drawing too much current. It is normal for circuit breakers to allow overcurrent for a short amount of time. This is needed by motors to start, ...


7

Get yourself a Kill-a-Watt power meter and measure each of your loads on each circuit. They also make upscale units with backlights and storage so you can unplug it and look at the stored data in a bit more comfort. Take Watts or VA (whichever is larger) and divide by 120 - this gives Amps. Or take "amps" right off the Kill-a-Watt. Tally up all the ...


8

If the breaker is working properly, you're simply overloading the circuit. If the breaker is tripping well below the rated load, it's in need of replacement. If it happens to be not merely older, but also one of the "dubious models" (such as Federal Pacific) the whole breaker panel should be replaced before something bad happens (they have a tendency to ...


1

Sum up the wattage of all the appliances plugged into the circuit and divide by the voltage. That will be the total amp they will draw in the worst case not accounting for motor starting loads which can peak above that. If the breaker is rated for more than that then it's probably gone bad and needs a replacement. If the draw is more than the breaker is ...


15

A breaker will trip according to its trip curve, at 40°C (104°F). In this condition, it should be able to carry 100% of the rated load. So if you have a 20 ampere breaker, at 40°C it should be able to carry 20 amperes. It's often recommended (and sometimes required), to only load a circuit to 80% its capacity. In most cases, devices are listed ...


2

In Canada, NMD 8/3 is allowed for up to a 40A circuit, NMD 6/3 is required for 50 A (Actually NMD 6/3 has an ampacity up to 55A, but try to find a 55A breaker…). Sorry, Eric. Additional info: You may find some ampacity tables that list NMD8/3 as having an ampacity of 55A, but these tables assume a 90˚C conductor temp, and the code says you need to use the ...


1

You most likely have an AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) not a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) on this circuit. Although it's not impossible that the breaker is bad, I think this is unlikely. It's more likely that there is an arc fault somewhere in the circuit. These can be hard to find, but worth the effort. I had a similar experience wiring a ...


1

Please do not remove the AFCI breaker. BMitch is correct is pointing out that breaker may be saving you from a fire, and removing it is certainly a violation of code. I had a similar experience wiring a new receptacle onto a circuit protected with an AFCI. After the new receptacle was installed, every time I switched on a steamer plugged into any receptacle ...


2

You'll need a double pole breaker. You'll connect the neutral to the neutral bar, the grounding conductor to the grounding bar, one ungrounded (hot) conductor to one terminal of the breaker, and the other ungrounded (hot) conductor to the other breaker terminal. At the panel in the shed, you'll connect the neutral to the neutral bar, the grounding ...


1

I agree that more knowledge is a good thing, and more knowledge is obtainable - hit one of those big-box home improvement stores' bookshelf section (they only thing they're good for) and paw through "how to wire a house" books til you find one that you vibe with. Or hit a library but those books may not reflect current code. This is learnable. Now, ...


4

Since this would be a sub-panel install, ground and neutral are NOT connected - they are isolated. There is but one bond between them per code, and that one already exists in the system that the power is coming from. I'd tend to agree with S.P. that your prior experience is either too long ago or too unrelated to what you are doing for it to seem a great ...


1

Uh-oh. Your voltage (hot to neutral) should not be 130V anywhere except a few countries where 127V is common. Start by measuring across the two hot "legs" in your panel. This value should be 220-240V, tending toward the latter, e.g. 238V. Now measure each leg to neutral, these should be very close to half that, and very close to each other, e.g. 118-...


0

I disconnected green (ground) and white (neutral) and measured resistance and it shows 0 Ohms. Does this mean that there is short between white and green? Yes, assuming you measured between the free ends of the wires. But it is normal for ground to be connected to neutral at the main panel. Note that measuring resistance of any wiring that might ...


5

A warm breaker can be normal, yes. Especially under a heavy load. If you are running a continuous load (80% circuit max for several hours) then I would certainly check the connections to be sure that extra heat is not causing problems. A heavy load will find a poor connection or termination and point it out to you as a problem in short order.


4

The reason why Zinsco/compatible breakers are so gosh darn expensive is because Zinsco panels are obsolete and have a somewhat checkered field failure history -- while they do not suffer as badly from the issues that plague FPE's line of non-breakers, the Zinsco breaker line still has some of the same problems: namely miscalibration (i.e. failure to trip ...


2

Supply vs Demand Zinsco panels/breakers are no longer manufactured because of product defect. Thus, businesses will markup the prices for them. Replacement Assuming the outdoor panel is your main panel, replacing the outdated, defected panel should be a relatively simple job using a modern Main Breaker panel sized accordingly. The Utility Company can ...


1

The refrigerator's motor may surge current on startup, but the local electrical code will discuss whether this is an issue. Anyway, this is beside the point. The point is, breakers protect wires. Whatever is the thinnest wire in that circuit - look up what amperage is permitted on that wire - the breaker should be no larger than that.


2

Most advice you'll find online is for the US, which doesn't really apply to you. They use 120V, so appliances use more current for the same power, requiring more dedicated circuits. I wouldn't run a dedicated circuit for anything except the range (stove, oven, hob, whatever you call it) and hot water (if electric). Everything else is on one of a couple of ...


3

Commonwealth countries normally use British standards in electrical wiring. For household wiring, there will be two distinct outlet from the distribution/circuit breaker board. One is 6A lines for the lighting circuits, and another one is 20A lines for all power outlet sockets. Lighting circuits are wired using 1.25 millimeter squared wires and the power ...



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