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0

I just want to clarify what you're asking. You have a sub-panel in your garage. How large is the breaker feeding this sub-panel? (located in your house) This sub-panel in the garage, has two 15a breakers, one of which is connected to the red, one to the black wire in a run of 10-3 wire. What does this circuit power? I'd assume your 240v heater? Is ...


1

If the two individual breakers are not tied together (e.g. both levers are physically connected), then your current setup is incorrect and unsafe. Both hot wires need to be tied together so they won't be tripped/switched off independently. You should replace the two individual breakers with a 240v breaker. It is only safe for said 240v breaker to be a 30 ...


0

No, it seems like each phase is wired to 15A putting a single 30A breaker wold pull 30A from one phase, only give you 115V and pull no current from the other phase.


6

Concurring mostly with Some Guy's answer here -- the reason why I take an aggressive tone in my other answers regarding FPE is because many of the OPs are coming to us because they want to do something to the breaker box, such as adding a new circuit or replacing a breaker that "died". Trouble Brews in the Panel I will start by linking my main source here, ...


5

You could not just have asked a question that would start a simple debate, like who will win the Superbowl next year. There is not a reason to replace the panel in a panic. It has worked this long, there is no reason to expect it to fail. Replace it when you can comfortably afford it. Yes, you almost certainly have FPE breakers. Instead you threw a ...


1

The breakers should be specifically marked as to what wire types and sizes the terminals are compatible with; they also should be aluminum wiring compatible if the house is wired with aluminum wire. But it's always good to check. You may need to remove the breakers to read the markings on them. You should be aware (before you buy) that Tyco "COPALUM" is ...


0

Lights flicker when the voltage drops. When voltage drops, current goes up. Hopefully the lights, only flicker when you turn something on. The rule of thumb for calculating loads is 1.5 'unit' for a receptacle, 1 for a light, and rated load for anything that is hard wired, you want to units to be less than 80% of the breaker current rating. So you want a ...


-2

Ask him what part of the code he thought putting a 30 amp breaker would cause the violation. Ask for true curiosity, if no other reason than I want to know. :) Is there a plug on the saw, so you can plug it into an outlet on the wall ? If not, put a plug on the saw and an outlet on the wall. (I can see him calling foul on a hard wired 15 amp rated saw, ...


4

I don't know about "slow trip circuit breakers", but maybe I can help you understand trip curves (and circuit breakers) a bit better. Then you'll see that all circuit breakers are "slow trip". Your basic, everyday, run of the mill circuit breaker offers two types of protection. Short-circuit protection is provided using a magnetic trip function, while ...


4

10 gauge wire can have a 30 amp breaker under the current National Electric Code. (and past ones too). Most places use the NEC, but some make changes. I do not have my book right here, but if needed I can get you the exact section in the code for that data. I am 'sure' he carries a current copy of the NEC with him, for reference. Aloysius is also ...


1

The simple answer is the one you least want to hear, though most likely the correct one. There's a fault in the wiring, and the breaker is doing the job it was designed to do. If you don't have the tools and/or knowledge to locate and repair the fault, it's time to step aside and let the pros do their thing.


0

I know you are to avoid making statement based on opinion, so here is my thought. The Breaker, like me, has gone soft and infirm. The 'thermal' part of the thermal-magnetic breaker was willing to tolerate the slow death of the burned switch, but it weakened itself in the process. So the slightest load will now trip it.


1

TL;DR: If you haven't incinerated yet, replace that panel as soon as possible, if not sooner!!! It looks like your panel may have been an archaic piece of equipment (fuse box?!) at some point which someone (illegally!) gutted and replaced with the guts of a FPE Stab-Lok panel. Sadly, what they did is replace old, but somewhat-functional service equipment ...


1

Yes, "down-rating" panels by installing a lower amperage main breaker of a type that meets the panel's listing is fine -- in fact, you can often order the exact same panelboard from the factory with different main breaker amperage options, or main lugs -- and then change it out freely in the field depending on installation conditions.


0

I seem to recall avoiding "Square D Homeline" due to possible issues with the copper over aluminum buss bars. I considered trying to get an "interchange/nonproprietary" brand having seen some folks with obsolete panels flailing to find breakers, but ended up with Square D QO as both available, affordable and with a solid copper buss. I hope it turns out to ...


-1

I don't think it violates the working clearance in the electrical code. I have seen tons of sump pumps under boxes. Tons. I have never seen them mentioned in inspection reports or in disclosures nor the city say anything after doing a new home inspection. Most sump pumps have covers and are flat on the floor and really there should be less water by the ...


1

Whoever put in the pump and/or the closet most likely created a "working clearance" code violation. I'd move it if you could. Doesn't sound like it would have to go far.


2

First off -- if the sump/sump pump protrude above the surrounding floor level, then they are a 110.26(E)(1)(a) violation: (a) Dedicated Electrical Space. The space equal to the width and depth of the equipment and extending from the floor to a height of 1.8 m (6 ft) above the equipment or to the structural ceiling, whichever is lower, shall be ...


0

10/3 copper NM is rated for 30A under the NEC, so the old oven was more than adequately wired, and it will support the new oven without difficulty as well. If you are of the unlucky type to have aluminum wire in your walls -- 10/3 aluminum NM will still handle 25A, so you will be fine. However, the load must be considered as the nameplate load (no demand ...


0

I would use 10 gauge wire and run new wire. You could use the old wire, but I would check it carefully for cracks. My experience is that old wire tends to get cracks in the insulation. Since you are replacing the breaker and oven, you may as well run fresh wire.



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