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6

No it is not safe. A 15 ampere rated receptacle should not be installed on a circuit protected by a 30 ampere breaker. You should not be plugging devices that draw more than 15 amperes, into a 15 ampere rated receptacle. The receptacle in your photo is a 20 ampere receptacle, so you shouldn't have a problem plugging in a 20 ampere device. They make ...


0

TL;DR: The dimmer's toast. Replace it. The short circuit or overload condition indeed likely smoked the switching element in the dimmer; modern dimmers use a special type of transistor-like switching element known as a triac to cut part of each half-cycle of the AC wave out in order to reduce the power being applied to the lamp. Unfortunately, triacs are ...


0

I'm betting that B1 provides power to the top outlet of a receptacle (probably on your kitchen counter) and B2 provides power to the bottom outlet. At some point that receptacle was changed (maybe you decided to change out the old looking receptacles and replace them with new snappy looking decora outlets?) Whoever changed them out didn't realize it was a ...


1

How about we just use the right wire with the right beakers. Electrical code is written for a reason. there's no way around it in my opinion. When we follow the code we protect our own interests and the interests of our family and customers.


1

I am of the strong opinion that for a residential application it almost does not matter what brand you choose. They are all nearly the same, even QO and CH series. Sure, copper buss is nice, but not mandatory. I have seen and installed pretty much every major brand in the last 25 years or so, they are ALL ok. I would choose something that you can get ...


1

Panel-ology, Selective (Dis)Coordination, and You What you are seeing (multiple circuits being knocked offline by an overload on a single circuit) is a not-uncommon phenomenon in some types of residental setups; however, understanding it requires some knowledge of how electrical panels are set up. Panel-ology (or how electrical panels are configured) ...


0

Although this is a very common issue you have to totally be certain that the flickering is only taking place by switching on the A/C. For the condenser to start it can take up to 100+ Amps of current for the first few milli seconds(aka locked rotor amps). This energy is much much greater than full load amps. As soon as the motor is up and running the ...


2

Im going to assume you are talking about either a window air conditioner or portable unit - not central AC. The lights flickering means the voltage is dropping. Incandescent bulbs are particularly sensitive to that. Most CFL and LED bulbs flicker less, though some may still flicker. The voltage is dropping because of a large current draw. It is normal ...


-1

I would get a electrical multi tester and verify the A/C unit is not drawing more amps/volts that it should, I would also wonder if the A/C unit is disrupting flow and possibly reversing the current. Electricity flows to the path of least resistance which is the purpose of the earth.


1

Two breakers on the same circuit that are not clipped or otherwise mechanically forced to trip at the same time... doesn't seem like a good idea. Best case: Someone upgraded the wires/fixtures on the circuit to handle the extra load but didn't want to reconfigure the panel. Worse case: Someone got tired of resetting the breaker and/or unplugging his ...


15

Alright, now that you found the blatant 240.8 violation: 240.8 Fuses or Circuit Breakers in Parallel. Fuses and circuit breakers shall be permitted to be connected in parallel where they are factory assembled in parallel and listed as a unit. Individual fuses, circuit breakers, or combinations thereof shall not otherwise be connected in ...


20

As @Ecnerwall says, definitely not safe / legal / advisable. My guess is that the guy kept tripping breaker #4 (maybe too many power tools in the garage?) and decided to share the load with another breaker by adding the extra wire. Approximately half of the current will flow through each breaker, effectively creating a 40 amp breaker. EDIT: in fact it's ...


13

Uh, NO!!! That was a hamfisted moronic code violating idiot wiring job done by a guy who said "hold my beer and watch this!" Rip it out and look around for other work this guy may have done while three sheets to the wind.


1

I would say that this is a sign the wiring itself has been damaged internally and is shorting or grounding out, which is what is causing the repetitive trips. I'd check in particular at where the wires enter the floodlight junction box -- the whack to the floodlight could have finished off abrasion-weakened wire insulation and created a short to ground.


4

To verify you have the correct one, turn off every other breaker one at a time and confirm that it controls whatever it says it does. By process of elimination, you can be fairly certain which breaker controls your garage because there should be one breaker that doesn't seem to control anything. Thoroughly check your garage for a tripped GFCI outlet. It ...



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