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8

No, that box can absolutely NOT be fixed. There are parts that are physically broken that are not replaceable, aside from that fact that it is generally in poor shape. Plus, I see evidence that that right-hand line side screw has overheated. Even if it could, as Aloysius said, it is really not worth it. Someone, probably a home inspector, will see it and ...


6

Unless you're in a real estate market so hot that people are doing drive-by-buying, just spend a few bucks to get a replacement panel. They're not expensive; labor won't be excessive, and then it won't be an impediment to sale. Even if the existing one was fixed, your potential buyer will be calculating money off to replace it.


4

First, it sounds like the old breaker is a GFCI or AFCI, and the new one is not. Changing types like that is likely a code violation and can compromise the safety of your electrical system. Do not do this unless you know why a GFCI or AFCI breaker was installed and that you have removed the conditions from that branch circuit that required their ...


2

If the lights stay on while the breaker is tripped, they must be getting power from another circuit. That means the electrician has mixed wiring between two different circuits. A GFCI breaker trips if there's any imbalance between the hot and neutral wires connected to it; if the lights are sharing the GFCI circuit's neutral wire while also drawing some ...


2

First item of order is to identify this breaker panel and find out if there is a national recognized fire hazard danger from the make and model breaker panel you have installed. Square D, Zinsco/Sylvania and Federal Pacific had failure modes where this happens. Stop, call a qualified electrician and have them inspect the panel. The bus bar contacts are ...


1

No screws holding it in? Some older panels had push-in small breakers and screw-in large ones. If no, your breakers are possibly corroded in place. Pull one of the breakers that comes out easily and look at the contacts in the box. Shiny, or dull and pitted? If the dryer breaker won't move easily you will probably have to force it out. Not difficult but it ...


0

This behavior is because arc-fault breakers have an interesting quirk: they also provide a small degree of ground fault protection as well! (They are not GFCI's because their ground-fault trip threshold is set to the 30mA used for equipment protection (GFPE) devices as opposed to the 5mA ground-fault (differential) trip of a Class A personnel protection ...


2

From the description, it sounds like the neutral may be shared between the two circuits, which you can't do with a GFCI. The GFCI is looking for an imbalance of current on the hot and neutral lines, so if the neutral is shared with another circuit, there will be some current returning on the neutral that did not go out on the hot. If you can trace the ...


0

I'm not sure where you live but US code calls for a minimum of #8 if you're using copper or #6 if you're using aluminum. There would be no advantage in using a larger wire size in this case because at 30ft you will have negligible losses. I don't know what your voltage is or how many phases you have but for an example of what your losses may be, I will ...


2

Well usually when "half" of something dies in residential electrical, it means one hot leg is down. This could be an issue at the transformer, the wiring to your meter, the meter itself, the wiring from the meter to your main panel, the main breaker or a fault within your panel. It is pretty easy to test for, you're just looking for 240v at the service ...


1

Check for a tripped (or faulty) GFCI outlet. If power is being fed through it, then you'd see your results.


1

Call a friend and have them come help you. Tell them to bring a cell phone. They will go from room to room and floor to floor with you on the phone, as you switch off each breaker one by one. When the power goes off in the room they are in, mark on your electrical panel which breaker/fuse you pushed and confirm what room your friend is in. No matter the ...



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