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2

You have 2 easy solutions. You can pull two breakers from the main panel, and relocate them to the sub. Or you can replace 4 breakers with half height breakers to make room and free up the connection to the new panel.


2

I'll tell you with 100% certainty that you CANNOT do this. Period. It is a serious code violation and safety issue to have the new 100A feeder be unfused.


1

Yes, FAU is "forced air unit", but this term is not used everywhere. Around here you'll many times see AH, or A/H for "air handler", which is what we would call the inside blower unit of a split air conditioning system.


0

There should be no problem running 4 ceiling fans on a single 15 ampere circuit, though it will depend on what else is on the circuit. Say a 52" fan is 90-100 watts (at high speed), plus three 60 watt bulbs. That puts each fixture at 280 watts or so. Which means four of them, would be 1120 watts. A 120 volt 15 ampere circuit, can supply 1880 watts (120 ...


0

With the main breaker on there is no guaranty. The ONLY way to be sure is if any and all main breakers are off.


4

FAU is likely a "forced air unit" (e.g. a heater or air conditioner). If it's two breaker switches tied together, that's a 240V volt circuit (if there's no tie between the two switches, that's an immediate hazard and must be fixed).


1

The one on the left is old, quite old, early 1960's to early 1970's I'd say. The one on the right is the new replacement for that old style breaker. The replacement for the one on the left is a non-CTL BR1515. See the question/answer here: http://www.amazon.com/BR1515-Circuit-Breaker-Without-Rejection/forum/-/-/1?_encoding=UTF8&asin=B002YF912M


5

I am assuming you mean there is no marking on the handle or front of the breaker (since that is all you see with the electric panel cover still on). If that is the case, there should be at least a part number on the side of the breaker, which can be looked up online if the rating isn't part of the part number. But you will have to turn off the power, ...


2

According to NEC 2014 210.12(A). ...kitchens, family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected...


3

You need to install a 20 ampere double pole GFCI breaker, instead of two single pole breakers.


0

There isn't a way that you can use a GFCI breaker on this circuit. The way a GFCI works, roughly speaking, is by measuring the current leaving on the hot wire and comparing it to the current returning on the neutral. The two currents should be identical – any difference is indicative of current "escaping" via a different ground path, possibly through a ...


2

You have a FPE panel, so why are you trying to put breakers in it? Just replace the entire panel, as the panel is telling you to...the fact you can't stick a breaker in easily should be a gigantic red flag that something is badly broken inside and you shouldn't bother trying to repair it!


7

REPLACE THIS PANEL NOW Your panel almost certainly is suffering from breaker-to-busbar contact damage, rendering it a ticking incendiary device. See this answer for the gory details on just what is wrong with FPE's "breakers". If you post a picture of your panel (dead front off), I can determine if you can have your electrician install one of the Eaton ...


6

i am not an electrician but I do know federal pacific went out of business years ago after it was found that their boxes were responsible for a number of fires. Change the entire panel just to be safe. keeping the federal pacific panel is asking for a trouble.


2

Do not just install a 2 pole 50 amp Breaker. First your wire would need to be rated for the correct breaker. Second if the oven is rated at FLA (Full Load Amp) not to exceed 40 amps and there was a fault, the 50 amp breaker may not trip and could start a fire or kill someone. If you can wait look at Amazon, one quick search and there it was. Also look at a ...


2

You'll need a double-pole GFCI breaker, wired like so: What you have described is a multiwire branch circuit. Because the neutral is shared, the overcurrent protection device(s) (in your case the two separate breakers) must be able to trip together. This can be remedied by installing a double-pole breaker, or by handle-tying two individual breakers. ...



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