New answers tagged

0

It will likely fit & you probably won't have any problems. But, read the panel's door for specifics of a replacement. Some panels are very particular about what materials or brands of breakers go in. If there's no mention of "only these brands", then whatever fits securely will be fine...they all have to meet the same standards, looks don't mean ...


0

The fuse box appears to be superfluous -- standard 4-wire 120/240VAC ovens do not need this sort of rigging. It appears that some antiquated built-in ovens brought their control circuit hot out separately from the oven element hots, hence the fuse box.


0

Are the pictures ones for your oven? If so it's a bit confusing that the oven control panel wiring is shown intact and the fuse box picture doesn't show this wire coming in. I assume the fuse box was disconnected from the oven for some reason? The schematic of a similar oven looks appropriate with red/black/white/green coming into the fuse block box but this ...


-2

Putting two breakers of same size and rating in series can be dangerous. manufacturers give the short circuit breaking current for ONE device. Modern CB operated with the magnetic force generated during the short circuit. This magnetic repulsion of the contacts is linked to the energy generated during the short circuit. The breakers are designed to open ...


0

I'd move the breaker with the red wire (the one you're replacing with the GFCI) to the other side of the panel as access to the neutral bar will be easier.


2

You have a panel with 12 spaces and you are using 4. Just move the red wire to an AFCI in a new space in the panel. I would also move the lower black wire to where the red wire is now, so it becomes visually obvious that both wires are meant to be on the same pole. I'm all for using a rainbow of colors in conduit/THWN, but in residential use with NM ...


3

You know those coils are cheap, consumable, field-replaceable items. It's common for departing tenants to replace drip pans and coils that are too dirty to clean easily. The coil may have lost some of its insulation and developed a short to chassis. But generally they are not valuable enough to ask "why".


2

Sounds like the coil is shorted and providing far less of a resistive heating path than it should be. It should be trashed and replaced as I don't think there is a way to fix that coil, unless you can specifically see the short between the two prongs that plug into the range.


2

Breakers protect wires. The wire to the sub-panel can only be protected by the breaker in the main panel, and that must be correct for the wire's type and size. Like Ed Beal says, you don't need a master breaker in a sub-panel. The breaker in the sub-panel wouldn't protect the wire to the sub-panel. It protects the sub-panel itself, which is listed for ...


0

With a 100A breaker in your main panel you do not even need a main breaker. I would leave the 200A in the sub as a disconnect. Take back the new 100A and get your $ refunded. If you ever decide to upgrade the service you will need the larger breaker.


1

Does this sub panel need a grounding wire connected to the main panel in the garage? Yes, you need a 4 wire connection (2 legs hot, neutral, and ground) from the main to the sub panel. Also the sub needs to be grounded, as you have planned two ground rods you are all set there. I agree with Ed Beal that in the case of electrical panels, bigger is ...


5

That Federal Pacific panel has to go as they are dangerous. As far as concerns about your skill, you sound like that particular kind of newbie who is well capable of learning to do it all safely and well; however my hunch is you are still thinking too much, and need to read a little more. It's OK, we all start there. Normally, just replacing a sub panel ...


0

In looking at the pics you posted, those two breakers are connected to what appears to be 12/3. This allows two separate circuits to share one neutral, although technically to do this, each circuit must be connected to opposite phases, since two 20A circuits on the same phase if loaded to capacity, would be putting 40A on the neutral. One 20A on each phase ...


3

I am a licensed Oregon electrician and it IS 100% legal to do your own wiring including planning. It needs to meet code or it will not pass inspection. First I would never update to a new panel for a home with a 100A even as a sub. I would put in at least a 150A panel with more breakers, the cost difference is not that big. 100A is the minimum size allowed ...


0

As mentioned in previous response, I would assume the repl. transformer is miss wired and it sounds like the effected breakers are likes GFCI and/or AFCI which means they are more sensative. Some of the Rail lights use the fixture structure as a conductor on the LV side fo the transformer. If you are not careful to isolate and not cross to ground this would ...


0

It sounds like a bad connection to the main breaker or a bad hammer in the main breaker. Try making the measurement at the main prior to the breaker. If your voltage is normal above the breaker the hammer in the breaker is not making a good contact. If it is the breaker turn your small breakers all off. With all the small breakers turned off flip the main ...


1

It is likely your breaker type... The CVS Power Unit is engineered using a high-performance motor. As with all power units, it is recommended that the CVSPU have a dedicated circuit to ensure consistent operation. ISSUE: Standard Square D Circuit Breakers May Cause Tripping Several dealers have reported nuisance tripping issues with the CVSPU. We have ...


2

Modern GFCI devices will not set if the LINE and LOAD are reversed. If there's power on the LOAD wires, the device will not (and should not) set. It sounds like the GFCI is working as designed. You're going to have to figure out how both circuits are wired, to determine if this is intentional or accidental. If it's intentional, you can simply cap one set ...


6

This is trouble, but easily solved. Simply swap out the 50 ampere GFCI breaker, for a 15 ampere GFCI breaker. You'll possibly have to use pigtails to connect to the breaker, as it may not accept the size wire used for the existing circuit. As "subpanels" seem to be quite popular around here, I'm surprised it hasn't been suggested yet. You could always ...


1

Last thing you want is a dodgy circuit breaker. I suggest that you replace it so when and if you ever have need for that breaker to protect a circuit you can depend upon it to work properly. I got the impression from reading your posting that you are using this circuit breaker as a regular switching function. Be aware that some breakers are not intended to ...


-1

I had a similar problem in my basement where all the outlets were dead except the two that control each garage door openers. I made a jumper cable with two male ends and fused the hot line with a 10 amp automotive fuse. You plug one end of the jumper into the door opener plug and the other end into one of the dead outlets. Now all the rest of the plugs on ...


2

This sounds like a bad connection upstream of the panel. No load, you get voltage - apply a load, voltage goes away. Try turning off all the breakers on the affected bus, with it connected. Does voltage return? Try (since you seem comfortable handling the feed wires - right, you do say sub-panel) marking the feeds and see if the problem follows the wire, ...



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