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19

I'm sorry, but from the tone of your question, and the fact that you even suggest plugging this motor into a regular 15A receptacle tells me you are so far over your head your only valid option is to hire a pro to wire this. This is NOT a simple DIY job and you cannot simply ask questions to get every little detail out of an internet message board to do this ...


17

You cannot get 220VAC from one leg in your panel. You must have two isolated 120VAC legs to do this. Using two single pole breakers on one leg will still only give you 120VAC. Why can't you have the main breaker replaced? You should be able to buy a replacement breaker without replacing the whole panel. Also, have you tried manually setting the magnets in ...


14

There should be a snap to it; the contacts are spring-loaded so that they make or break contact quickly, reducing any arcing that might occur as they approach or separate. Arcing can still happen, but there's less opportunity for it than if the contacts were moving at the speed that you're moving the switch. Like any mechanical device, they can wear out ...


14

Not an uncommon problem. I have had a lot of problems with GFI's the last few years myself. There are a few likely causes: A fault still exists and will not allow the GFI to reset. The GFI tripped due to an overload and the differential circuit was damaged, thus the outlet is now toast. This seems to be a common complaint with standard 15 amp GFIC's. they ...


12

As ChrisF mentions, any mechanical device causes some wear when it operates. With that said, let us start by checking with the National Electrical Code (NEC). NEC 2011 404.11 Circuit Breakers as Switches. A hand-operable circuit breaker equipped with a lever or handle, or a power-operated circuit breaker capable of being opened by hand in the event ...


11

Double Taps With most devices you can only have one wire per screw terminal, however, some breakers do support multiple wires under terminals. If the device allows multiple taps, it must be listed for the purpose. NEC 2008 110.14 Electrical Connections. (A) Terminals. Connection of conductors to terminal parts shall ensure a thoroughly good ...


11

If you need a receptacle that can accept a grounded plug but don't actually have a need for grounding, you have two options: (1) a GFCI-type receptacle marked with the words “No equipment ground,” and (2) a three-prong outlet protected by an upstream GFCI and marked with the words “GFCI protected” and “No equipment ground”. See section 210-7(d)(3) of the ...


11

The main breaker is sized to trip before the total current draw of the panel exceeds either a) the current carrying capacity of the feed from the electric company, or b) the current carrying capacity of the breaker panel bus bar, whichever is less. So if you order a 100 amp service and your breaker panel is rated for 120 amps, then your main panel should ...


11

Breakers are supposed to be good for a fairly large number of triggers, and they are supposed to fail open when they fail. Is there a chance that you were running at a heavier overall load when the second incident occurred? I'm thinking that if you were say within 10 amps of max on the main breaker just due to normal load (air conditioners, perhaps?), and ...


11

One of my favorite code sections, which basically says RTFM... National Electrical Code 2014 Article 110 Requirements for Electrical Installations I. General 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation and Use of Equipment. (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any ...


10

If the #14 or #12 wire is a branch going to specific loads, then it is "safe" with respect to that load. It won't overload that wiring regardless of the breaker capacity use (or even if the breaker is bypassed entirely). However, this is unsafe in the context of changes in usage. The electrical code focuses on safety and rightly prohibits this. The ...


10

Probably. Here's a diagram of how a main panel and a subpanel are usually wired together: In this diagram: The main panel (on the left) has one breaker at the bottom that controls two outlets. The subpanel on the right gets its power from the top right two breakers in the main panel. Turning that pair of breakers off will turn off the entire subpanel. ...


9

There's no good way to do this. You could (in theory) get a spare electrical box, wire it into your main box such that it had access to more current than the breaker under test, and then install the breaker into that spare box, cause a short and watch it trip. Alternately, you could install the breaker, overload the circuit in question (borrow all the ...


9

For residential, the National Electric Code (NEC) has no official min. In Commercial and Industrial you can put 10 on a 15 amp breaker and 13 on a 20 amp breaker. Local codes sometimes specify a max, so you might want to check if you are going high. But yeah, thats really low! Unless there were some dedicated appliances running there, you can definitely ...


9

Put your computers on a UPS, even a small one. Just protecting yourself from short power outages will save you a bunch of downtime. Even if you resolve your overload issue, this is still worth it. Most computer users today can get by with a laptop that's under $500, giving you built-in battery backup & portability in a compact, low-power package. Plug ...


9

They make Circuit Breaker Tracers for this purpose You plug in one end to the circuit you want to trace, then use the probe to identify which breaker in your panel the tracer is connected to. These devices differ from a telco tracer tool in that they work on live elctrical circuits. This particular model is about $45USD at the time of writing.


9

While I think you'll be smart to hire an electrician and consider replacing the whole panel... Circuit breaker boxes vary in style. You have to buy the correct replacement breaker for your specific box. To determine what you need, examine the box itself. Somewhere on the box will be the name of the manufacturer. Tip: "Square D" is not it. (Personal ...


8

There should only be one wire per screw terminal. One of my wiring books says that some local codes allow splices inside a service panel, and some don't, so you should check with your local authority to make sure it's OK in your area. However, regular circuit breakers are only a few dollars, so even if it's allowed in your area, my advice would be to ...


8

You are missing something. Either you have not found the correct breaker yet, or the breaker is not inside the breaker panel for your house. Walk through each breaker in the breaker planel for your house. You could have a mislabled breaker. (The breaker you are looking for is likely a two-pole 240V breaker, maybe 30 amps or better.) Since this is a ...


8

I use a circuit finder, like this: It requires a little finesse, but not too much. http://www.amazon.com/GB-Electrical-CS550A-Circuit-Breaker/dp/B001DT6NC6/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1289622691&sr=8-2


8

I am not a physicist, but i don't think the larger more expensive breaker is going to make much difference in your residential situation. If you draw 1,300 amps, not only will the breaker arc over, but your wiring will be arcing, burning , not to mention your main breaker and service entry cable from the utility, which is probably only 4/0 alu rated at 200 ...


8

Unraveling this mess may be difficult. Seeing the 30 amp breaker join the two sides indicates that the two hot lines go straight down each side in the back of the panel rather than alternating every other breaker. If it were alternating, then any 220 circuit only needs two vertical slots rather than taking up all the space of both sides as well. What this ...


8

Disconnect the power Start by turning off the breaker, and pulling the serviceman disconnect, which will typically look something like this. This will insure no electricity is flowing to the condenser unit while you're working. Open the unit Next you'll want to disassemble the unit, to allow access to the electrical parts. This will vary from unit to ...


8

100% you need an electrician out there ASAP. If you can't manually trip it, there's a good chance it won't trip in an overcurrent situation and that could be very dangerous. Your electrician will probably need to arrange this with the power company. To do this, the power must be cut upstream, and usually this involves removing the seal on your exterior ...


7

Some research says that a QP circuit breaker is the 1" or 2" wide breakers that protect a 110V or 220V circuit respectively, and is made by Siemens. Square D is another manufacturer of circuit breakers and service panels. Ideally, you would want to have all your circuit breakers be manufactured by the same company that makes your service panel; the ...


7

Let me try and explain the breakers using this hypothetical scenario. Let's say you have a 20A circuit which has 3 computers on it, totaling 12A. Let's say you have a power strip with a coffee pot and a heater, totaling 10A. Now plug in the power strip to the 20A circuit. Your 20A circuit now is overloaded with 22A, while your power strip is not ...


7

30 amps is where a 30 amp breaker should cut off, and to avoid that, you should only use 80% of the breaker's capacity. So for a 30 amp breaker, you shouldn't be using more than 24 amps. Using a 50 amp breaker and a dedicated outlet ensures that you don't exceed the capacity of the circuit with that appliance.


7

Sounds like either your replacement fuse is bad or perhaps it is not fully screwed in. First thing, try another new fuse. While you are replacing it, visually inspect the connection. You are looking for burns or other debris. The other possibility is that he overloaded the circuit to the point where a connection or wire failed somewhere. If you have a ...



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