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7

Depending on your location, build a planter. This included the base and the wall surrounding it. You could do a traditional rectangle or something modern like these...


6

Plant climbing vines at the wall, let them climb and cover. Take note of the "sound walls" around the interstates or beltways around the cities. Many have vines growing over them to aid in the sound deadening. Find what the specie is and go from there.


5

The metal on a wood rasp would be way to soft to make any type of dent in the concrete. The only thing you will do is destroy the rasp. You should use a roto hammer with the proper sized bit to widen the hole.


5

The easiest way to insulate concrete block is to glue foam insulation board directly to the block. These boards come in 4 ft X 8 ft sheets and different R values. The other method is to build a wood or steel stud wall along the block to hold blanket style insulation along with electrical wiring etc. This method is a lot more work, but gives you a base to ...


4

There is no need to give the panels 100% coverage. Just get some on the edges and a few good daps here and there. As long as it sticks to the wall, you should be OK. Once you backfill the bottom, the panels shouldn't go anywhere.


4

This website has a good explanation of hydrostatic forces on a dam surface. You could build your wall with a submerged lip to help counteract the moment applied by the water pressure on the vertical face of the wall. Image from TheConstructor.org I did some quick calculations and got the following: So to sum up my incoherent scribblings, assuming a 30 ...


4

You could build an outdoor fire pit. Be sure to check with your local fire regulations first; depending on your location, the fire pit might not be allowed, or there might be restrictions on when you are allowed to use it.


4

Here in Southern California when tract homes are constructed along freeways a block wall is constructed the length of the lots. Similar to yours I'm guessing. Rather than having a smooth and flat surface the face of the blocks are irregular and textured. Some project several inches past plumb while others look to have an angled face. It would appear that the ...


3

Unbelievable good math for a block wall, but I think Jim is only going to have one block on the ground at the top of the pond. The liner itself is very strong, and once laid up and over the block, that block is not going anywhere. Not only would 6 inches of water have to move the block, but stretch the liner the same distance as moving the block. The most ...


3

You can buy sound deadening panels or sheeting - You would construct a fence-like structure inside your block wall, then hang the sound absorbing panels or sheeting from that. The material can be part-covered with regular wooden fencing, or plants, or painted, or a combination. You may be able to get away with only performing this treatment on a couple of ...


3

Instead of tile, consider 9/16"-ish thin brick veneer, which looks good in combination with concrete block. Something like this: You could put a wire lath over the blocks, and then just use mortar to adhere the brick to the lath/blocks. Another option would to be run a 1x8 cedar "trim" board to cover the horizontal concrete blocks. This would look ...


2

Since concrete blocks are fairly thick, I'd drill several holes along the line you want to cut with a masonry bit, then use a use a mini jack hammer such as a small DeWalt with a 1/2" chisel bit. The hole will not be perfect shape etc, so you will need to fill around the vent after installed with some mortar. The pilot holes will help keep the hole in a ...


2

Yes you can set drywall directly to the block wall. If it intersects with an exterior wall that is exposed to the weather, I would place a layer of poly of out of the intersecting corner, if accessible, out no more than 2', 18" would probably be better, vertically to prevent any moisture coming through the block and getting into the sheetrock. Use drywall ...


2

Chalk a circle the size that you want. Drill holes every quarter of an inch or so. Drill bit only need be thick enough to not break as it passes through. Do this all the way around till you can gently hammer out the hole.


2

This doesn't look like foundation damage. This is a settling of the pathway around your house. Good news is that it doesn't look like serious problem, at least from what I can see from the picture. This issue should be fixed because it will only get worse, and then rain water will go under you foundation and that could be a problem. You should demolish ...


2

Can I convince you to not do this ? Honestly not trying to be an ass. Please, please - Get a quote from a company that builds retaining walls. The quote will cost very little or nothing. You will be shocked at the cost, and not in a good way. The quantity of material needed to build the wall, will amaze you. Please get a quote or two first. I promise ...


2

Those "big wooden casts" are called "forms", by the way. Very often brick is chosen over concrete for its aesthetic value. It's also relatively easy to double-wall brick for insulation purposes, but it's extremely difficult to pour two good-quality 4"-thick concrete walls immediately adjacent to each other.


2

Ceiling joists don't necessarily hold up the walls. What they do is prevent the outward force of the roof pushing the walls out. The joists 'pull' the outward forces together canceling them out so that the only force on the walls is then downwards. Whether your walls are stick frames or masonry, they're strength is in compression from downward forces ...


2

Another term for these is breeze block in the UK or besser block in Australia. As the are larger than bricks a wall can be built more quickly than with bricks. They are usually used for the interior skin of a cavity wall and any interior load bearing walls.


2

I agree with the textured blocks mentioned by ojait. The idea is to scatter the sound waves. In fact you could also use wooden slats at, say, 45 degrees. These would reflect the sound skywards (or indeed into the ground). If you use the right timber that won't rot, then the slats can also form a frame for climbing plants.


2

Are you sure it was mold? It may have been mildew. In my experience, mildew can grow on nearly any surface as long as it stays moist...be it bare concrete or painted concrete. In this case, the moisture on this interior wall likely is not coming from outside the basement, but rather is moist air condensing on the cool concrete. Painting it won't stop that ...


2

That is odd. If that's how the mice got in then you want to fill the blocks with gravel & then smooth that over with concrete or cement. If the mice didn't enter there then "Big Gap" spray can foam would be the insulation choice & best treatment. If you'd like to use the block voids to secure the sill of the stud wall(s) then you can screw cleats to ...


2

Brick laying is an art form. It takes a lot of time to get the technique down. Professional masons make the process look much easier than it really is. One thing that can help is to buy a pre-mixed mortar instead of trying to make your own. It should have a better consistency than what you are using. There are also many different kinds of mortars. A type M ...


1

You could use a heavy duty drill and a diamond encrusted bit, such as this one They can be found on-line and in some big box stores for about $20. When grinding or cutting very hard materials like concrete, you should use a lubricant to reduce heat. Usually a small constant drip of water at the cut point helps. Images and links for illustration only, ...


1

Yes, you can and it will work. It will also dull your rasp.


1

Option 1 - tapcon screws (or similar) into the solid parts of the block. Option 2 - stuff some wire mesh a few inches down the holes. Mix a very stiff mortar/concrete, place on top of the mesh, make a lovely smooth flat surface, and drop in some anchor bolts (probably overkill for a windowframe) or just screw the board in with tapcons or the like but ...


1

There are two very important dimensions left out of the "Obstruction Details". See picture below. Overall height of overhead clearance. (Directly related to number of courses of cinder blocks in the wall). Width of the opening. (This is of lesser importance than the overall height). The dimensions I show are just pure guesses based on what one may ...


1

If you live in a cold climate I would sacrifice a couple square feet of living space and add 2x4 studded walls in front of block wall. This way you can get proper insulation and use electrical boxes. If you are getting permits you may be required to do this to insulate the walls up to R21 depending on climate zone


1

To make a retaining wall the stone (or other immutable material) must be make a 45-degree angle into the hillside. The footing must be as broad as the plinth and must go as deep as the frost line. In New England where I live the frost line is 4 feet deep, so I have used that depth in the diagram. Any other form of wall will eventually collapse. If the wall ...



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