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12

The Feb. 2012 issue of Consumer Reports had a sidebar about new hybrid halogen/CFL light bulbs as part of a review of light bulbs. The sidebar includes a picture of a two-pack of GE Energy Smart 75W equivalent bulbs. These bulbs have a halogen bulb inside the CFL swirl. The theory is that the halogen is used when the light is first turned on, providing ...


12

We have had CFL's in a number of enclosed fixtures for years now. They generate comparable light for much less heat. The main thing you need to worry about with CFLs is, you can't use them on a dimmer unless that dimmer is designed for them. Other than that - less heat means even less risk of fire in my book.


11

Unfortunately that's the nature of flourescent lights. The TL;DR version is that the ballast in a flourescent light (that's the ballast in the fixture itself for tubes, and built into the bulb for CFLs) works by creating voltage spikes that get the arcing in the bulb going, to produce the light. Dimmable CFLs do this with a HUGE jolt to provide an ...


11

It looks like CFL bulbs are difficult to dim. A dimmer typically reduces the effective voltage, which decreases current to the bulb. The science behind fluorescents just isn't meant to work that way, explained Paul McLellan with eLightBulbs, a division of Service Lighting, a Maple Grove, Minn., lighting supply company. It can cause dimmer ...


9

As far as I know, the only risk at issue here is of overheating. The heat comes from two sources: the output and waste heat of the bulb, and from resistive heating of the lamp wires and switch and socket contacts. CFL bulbs draw less current and produce less heat for a given light output; however, they are far less tolerant of high temperatures! Therefore, ...


9

Do not use a non-dimmable CFL with a dimmer. It shortens the CFL's life, and, in rare cases, a dimmer operating a CFL could result in fire. Change it out with a switch to be safe. Dimmable CFLs aren't as good as incandescent for dimming. Their lowest settings are nowhere near that of incandescent, but they are good if you want the option to save on power ...


8

The short answer is to check with the bulb manufacturer. Ambient temperature and use case requirements may also be mentioned on the box/packaging. The long answer is that it depends (as always eh?). From what I could find online, CFLs and incandescent bulbs are actually MORE sensitive to LOW temperatures than LEDs. So in your specific use case, I would ...


8

This is normal for fluorescent bulbs. You should be able to see the same thing when you turn off the light fixture using a regular switch instead of dropping a tree across your power line. Fluorescent lights generate light by an electrical discharge through the mercury vapor in the tube; the mercury emits UV light, which excites electrons in the phosphorus ...


7

Seems the issue is with Reliance testers: ElectricianTalk.com has this to say A while back I [posted] that I had bought a lot of cfl lamps. My electric bill did not seem to change all that much so I decided to test some of them. Here are some of the results. 15 watt cfl P=62watt 15 watt spot P=73 watts 13 watt mini spiral P=51 watts I ...


6

Say your electrical bill is $100 a month. Now say you have a refrigerator, a computer, a window fan and your light bulbs in your house as your only electrical devices. Everything but your light bulbs are on 24/7. Fridge: 725W *NOTE MOST FRIDGES DON'T ACTUALLY RUN 24/7 THIS IS JUST FOR EXAMPLE PURPOSES Computer : 125W Fan: 150W Lights (on 8 hours a day, ...


6

Why your various meters don't do a good job measuring power being used by various devices is due to an AC Circuit phenomenon known as Power Factor. Power Factor The ratio of real power to apparent power. Real power is the work done, apparent power is the product of the current and voltage in the AC circuit. Capacitive and inductive loads cause a phase ...


5

From the GE website: Compact fluorescent light bulbs may generally be used in enclosed fixtures as long as the enclosed fixture is not recessed. Totally enclosed recessed fixtures (for example, a ceiling can light with a cover over the bulb) create temperatures that are too high to allow the use of a compact fluorescent bulb.


5

I don't know codes. But from the standpoint of dissipation of energy I can't imagine how putting something that dissipates less power as heat (most of a light bulb's power consumption ends up as heat) could be less safe than an equivalent wattage light bulb. That is, if you replace something that used to use 60W (mostly ending up as heat) with something that ...


4

Yes, that is normal. In a metal fixture, to put it simply: anything that can conduct electricity (but whose primary purpose is not to conduct) must be grounded. This is in case something shorts out and energizes the fixture, if someone grabs hold of the fixture (and provides a path to ground via their body) they don't get electrocuted. Having the fixture ...


4

When turned off, the mercury in the fluorescent tube condenses on the inside surface of the tube. In order to emit light, the mercury must evaporate and form a vapor as the conductive path between the ends of the tube. The colder the bulb is to begin with, the longer it takes for all the mercury to evaporate, and for the light to reach full brightness. ...


4

It appears that you have a "new construction" fixture. These are designed to be installed and accessed when the drywall is down. So to work on this fixture from below, you'll have to cut an opening in the drywall. I would suggest making the opening smaller than 2'x2' so you can use the drywall patches sold by most home improvement stores. Make sure two sides ...


4

Directly from Reliance Controls CFL and LED lighting have irregular current draws and in turn, irregular (non-linear) waveforms. These loads cannot be measured by this device accurately, sorry. Primarily the THP103 is intended for measuring medium-large sized loads to help facilitate load management in a backup generator/transfer switch ...


3

Everyone is saying, one way or another, that residential lighting is not a significant part of your electric bill. More efficient bulbs will eventually save you money, but depending on usage patterns and energy costs, this can take many years. If you want to see significant change in your electric bill, you need to address the major consumers of power. The ...


3

What matters is clearance and airflow around the ballast in the base of the CFL. CFL lamps that run in environments where airflow cannot take away the excess heat will suffer a much shorter lifespan. The higher the wattage, the more heat they will generate, though much reduced from what using an over-wattage incandescent (which can create a fire hazard) ...


3

Did you compare the watts used including ballast and what the dimmer is rated? Lutron's C.L dimmer advertises it will dim 600W incandescent but the CFL & LED's cannot be over 150W. This also lowers if multi-ganged or if fins are removed. Some other CFL dimmers show that you are only allowed X number of lamps. Your 5 x 60W sounds like you should be ...


3

Approximately two years ago I had a CFL in a hanging bar fixture, open at the bottom. I'm not sure how long it was in there but, the CFL bulb exploded in the fixture. The part that exploded was between the base and the glass light part. It startled all of us, but thank goodness we didn't have to deal with mercury splattered everywhere and there was no ...


3

If you can afford the LEDs to do it, and they are rated for that use, I'd definitely go that way. But at $20 to $70 per bulb, LEDs can cost you quite a bit. Also, would you leave twenty dollar bills scattered around out there? Or fifties? Consider if the LEDs might make an attractive theft target... I live in a slightly less cold climate, and we put ...


2

Well Cabbey, you are not alone. I have run into the same problem with several fixtures designed to accept standard G25 type bulbs when trying to use CFL's. There is an obvious difference in the neck shape and dimensions. As far as the fixture is concerned, maybe you could go to Home Depot and take a look at the fixture you have at home and see if a simple ...


2

I'm playing a bit fast and loose with the units here -- Watts are a measure of power, but the idea should be clear. Typically, you find these ratings on the socket where there is likely to be a shade in use. The smaller the lamp, the more likely you are to use a small shade, and the closer the shade will be to the actual bulb. The warning is there so you ...


2

That's strange! You should test the bulbs in a different fixture on a different circuit, and maybe at a different property. You could just use a cheap lamp socket on a cord as a test fixture. How the bulbs react in the different scenarios will tell you if the problem is the bulbs, the fixture/light circuit, or some other problem in your house wiring.


2

You will be OK as far as not overloading electrically. You need to adhere to the most restrictive labeling, the 40wx3. Since you are using 27wx3, you are OK. The 75w limit is for the socket base only. It can handle 75w, but the rest of the fixture cannot. Be aware that 81 watts of fluorescent light is WAY more than the 120 watts of incandescent. If 120 watts ...


2

If it is just the glare or light color of the incandescents that yo do not like, consider 40 watt equivalent candelabra CFLs like these If you need higher wattage, there are 60 watt equivalent versions, but I have not seen them with the bullet shape of most conventional candelabra bulbs. A broader CLF bulb may fit, but you need to check for clearance and ...


1

Let's say we have 2 bulbs connected in parallel Volts Amperes Ohms Watts 1 120 0.5 240 60 2 120 0.5 240 60 ________________________________ T 120 1 120 120 kWh 0.12 Now we swap out one bulb with a 15W CFL Volts Amperes Ohms Watts 1 120 0.5 240 60 2 120 0.125 960 15 ...



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