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10

Yes, placing registers (or other heat sources such as radiators) near exterior windows and doors is the usual practice. This is done in order to combat cold drafts and ensure a more even temperature throughout the room. Here's a Q&A on the subject from Ask This Old House: Window glass is the coldest part of a wall. When warm room air hits it, the ...


8

A properly functioning and properly sized central air conditioning unit should be able to maintain the temperature of your house at any reasonable temperature you select. The amount of cooling available is related to the size of the system, insulation in the house, and finally outside air temperature. From your description I would guess either you don't ...


8

I live in South Florida and I too have to do this. My house has 2 AC systems. One of them clogs up after about 3-4 months, the other never has. I'm not sure what the difference is, but ever since I started putting a bit of bleach in the condensate line every time I change my filters; I've had no clogs since then. Assuming this is actually your problem, I ...


8

You may be looking at the problem backwards, the freezing lines could be a symptom of the problem not the cause. Start by looking for blockages in the system that would cause lower air flow / heat exchange. Dirty filters. Clogged ducts. Closed dampers. Closed/Blocked vent covers. Dirty coils. Basically if the system cannot exchange the heat/cold, it ...


7

Whether you tape it or otherwise block it, the effect will be the same and it will not cause any damage to your system; it would be no different than if there was a standard register there that was closed. The only thing I'll note is that duct tape will eventually dry up and fall off. Ideally you would use foil HVAC tape Unlike duct tape, this will not ...


6

The large, cold, low pressure line, carrying the evaporated coolant from the house, should be insulated to prevent condensation. The small, warm, high pressure line, carrying condensed coolant into the house, should not be insulated. I am not an air conditioning professional. However, en.allexperts.com, www.bobvila.com, and www.familyhandyman.com, all agree ...


5

The past home owner left these in my place. Where the blowing air just gets caught behind the curtains, is under furniture or tropical plants, I divert it, and this just happens to be towards places where people sit. Keep in mind in the winter, having the warm air low helps mix it. But in all seasons, the vents are near windows and doors to counteract the ...


5

Every year or two I call out a professional company to check the coolant levels and check for any mechanical defects since I don't have all the gear to do it myself. Aside from that I just try and keep the area free of debris and anything that could damage the unit. In my case I have a tree off to the side and several branches hang over the unit which I ...


5

List of possible causes and fixes: Insufficient airflow. You have identified this issue but not the cause. 1) Take all air filters out of the system. Give the system 30-40 minutes and see if this fixes the issue. 2) Ensure all vents are fully open. 3) Verify and/or adjust the cooling blower's air speed. WARNING: Turn the power off to the HVAC before ...


4

The first thing to check is the return air filters. If they're dirty, your system won't be able to keep up. Also, if the coils are dirty or the refrigerant is low, you will not get efficient cooling. You can clean your condenser coils (the outside unit) yourself using a jet of water from a hose. Contact a service company to clean your evaporator coils, do ...


4

You need to restrict the flow through that duct, either by installing a damper like this in the duct, or by installing an adjustable register at the duct outlet, and closing it off until you get similar flow out of all three ducts.


3

You'll want to create a small leach pit, which will allow the water to drain into the ground. Start by digging a hole about 12-18" deep (depending on your soil), Next fill the bottom of the hole (about half the hole) with crushed stone (loosely compacted). Fill the rest of the hole to about 1" from the top with sand, then finish with a nice decorative ...


3

I had the same issue recently on my HVAC as well. You probably have a PVC pipe running from the bottom of the evaporator coil housing. The blockage is probably in there somewhere. You can disconnect the PVC and let the condensate drain into a bucket. If it does drain cleanly into a bucket, your blockage is in that drain line. Either snake it out or ...


3

The Trane unit has a special coat of paint that will make it look good for years and years, I doubt you will need to wax it. See Page 5 of the Trane informational packet:.


3

If you do this, make sure you don't get any wax on the coil! Doing so would hurt the unit's performance. As others have said, this is totally a cosmetic thing. It won't help the life of the unit much. When the unit needs to be replaced, it will be because the coil or compressor is busted (probably 15yrs from now), and you've decided it isn't worth ...


3

No, probably not. The reason there are two lines is in case one gets clogged up, the second one will be used as a backup. The reason for the backup line is if the unit is in the house, you absolutely don't want a clog in one drain line to cause water to drip out of the unit and get all over your house. Since it is in the garage though, it probably just ...


3

Most local HVAC service companies offer an annual service plan where they come out once a year (twice a year for a heat pump), check over everything in the system (indoor and outdoor), clean off the coils, replace the air filters, etc. They will measure the voltage and resistance of various electrical components in the system, as well as measure the ...


3

It sounds like you have a condensation draining problem. Air conditioners capture a lot of water from the air. Most of the time A/C water leaks are caused by a problem draining this condensation. Stopping the a/c will stop the condensation, and eventually (depending on how much water is backed-up) the unit will stop leaking.


2

As others have said, if the unit is properly sized for the house, and the insulation is good enough to keep the heat out, and there is enough airflow in the house, the A/C should be able to handle almost any temperature you set it to. There is a point where it gets so hot outside that air conditioners simply can't do anything to get rid of the heat (the ...


2

If the copper lines are frosting over, it sounds like you are low on coolant. If the coolant levels are low, the unit is unable to cool the house, which means it keeps running, and the copper pipe keeps getting colder and colder, until the humidity condenses on it and eventually freezes. If the lines are frosted, it means the unit is overworked. Stop ...


2

If I understand the question, it sounds like you're asking how to keep a glass greenhouse cool in the desert. That a daunting task and, well, seems a little impractical. That said, some ideas: make the roof openable/retractable be sure to allow for lots of cross-ventilation (side windows/screened in) block the sun curtains awnings curtains put the ...


2

If your heating system is purely electrical (see comments), then your outside unit is not an Air Conditioner, but a Heat Pump, who's job is to take heat from outside (ha ha for you New Englanders and Mid Atlantic types) and bring it inside. So your system is squealing because it's running as its supposed to, only it's cold outside, and the parts need ...


2

IMO that amount of rust is not normal. I live in Texas and it gets really humid sometimes. I've repaired both my last unit that was 8+ years old and my new unit that is 4+ years old and neither had any rust whatsoever inside the enclosure. Just ants and spiders for me. I'd imagine that your relay is having trouble closing. After turning off the power you ...


2

I would only place the unit in the attic if it was a second unit and it avoided ducts running up and down walls. With an attic unit, you have to worry about a clog in the condensate line causing a leak in your ceiling. Access is frequently more difficult and requires a trip through your entire home. As tabun mentioned, it's noisier. You'd also need to run ...


2

I don't have HVAC experience but here's a few ideas you could investigate Repair For the wires, it might be best to cut off the corroded connectors strip a short part of insulation and crimp on new connectors. For the spade terminals on the various devices you could use a wire brush to remove as much corrosion as possible. Prevention To prevent future ...


2

I would strongly encourage you to replace this unit (the Siemens component, not the entire AC) and replace the ends to those electrical wires. Simply put if the rust situation is that terrible I wouldn't be at all surprised if the integrity of the unit is already compromised, i.e. ready to fail you at any time. Your yellow wire is almost certainly why it's ...


2

There are plenty of reason why, not sure exactly why your is though. Here a few reasons: Humidity. Circulating air, especially climate control air, will help eliminate differences in humidity that can lead toward mildew, mold, bugs issues, etc. Selling point. In most regions that I've observed, any climate controlled area can count toward square ...



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