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6

The thinset and mesh tape are to strengthen the seams. If you are going to tile over the cement board, you should tape the seams. This should not be that difficult. Pack in thinset, lay on the tape, and flat-knife to get it set in. In the corners, use a corner knife. If you just want to leave the corners untreated that will probably be fine, because that ...


3

You may break a few pieces(of marble) just picking them up. A skim coat on either side of the joint will help. Block feather with a concrete 'rubbing' block. My marble floor always have Schluter Ditra under them. I also use it with any questionable floor. Ceramic tile can tolerate L/360 deflection, stone is twice as sensitive at L/720. If you have any ...


2

A membrane (whether thin sheet or liquid) applied over the backerboard, is a vastly superior means of waterproofing, This is because it sits immediately under the tile, as opposed to behind the backer. Red Guard and HydroBan are some liquid membranes and Kerdi and NobleFlex are thin sheet membranes.


2

I did go ahead and pour a board, and have the results. I was told sand filler instead of gravel for <= 2". I went with just the default sand filler blend and thin steel rebar mesh (wire basically) at my local hardware store. A 1.5" board that was about 4.5" wide and supported at 2' intervals supported 110 pounds. I had decided prior that 80 lbs would be ...


2

There is a link to a complete installation guide for this type of fiber cement board at the supplier link in your posting. From that guide it says: Always cut the material outdoors. Never cut the material indoors. Never dry sweep accumulated dust - Use wet suppression or HEPA Vacuum. For the outdoor application: Position the cutting ...


2

The reason for cement board is to give a good adhesion surface and to increase stability. When a floor flexes from the weight of people walking, or from movement of the house, grout and even the tiles themselves can crack. For a temporary platform intended for a cat box, you're not looking at a lot of weight causing flexing, so I doubt there'd be much ...


2

You don't have to use a backerboard on shower ceilings - especially if you aren't tiling it. You can drywall it. If you do use a backer board I would suggest Hardieboard. You would then just put a skim coat of joint compound (mud) over and sand.


1

Here is an idea to consider. If the tile comes off the cement board fairly easy, you could leave the cement board, scrape off the thinset and lay your foam and laminate over the cement board. Just a thought depending on the overall thickness you need to achieve.


1

If it was installed correctly, the cement between cementboard and wood will be thinset and it will break off the wood fairly easily - it's put there to fill the space well, not to actually bond it particularly. If it was glued down with construction adhesive you might be in for a more miserable time. Safety glasses, gloves, and a sledgehammer to get started. ...


1

Sheet the wall with membrane like Kerdi (Schluter product) or Noble Flex. It will tend to 'unitize' the wall (by spanning multiple pieces of cement board). Be sure to embed with a portland cement based thin set mortar. As an added benefit, it will completely waterproof the wall. Its a bit belt-and-suspenders, but I like my shower walls DRY.


1

Since they're up, I agree adding blocking is a PITA. However, if its an inside wall that you have access to the other side of, use a "BIG GAP" polyurethane foam. Drill a series of 1/4" holes every 12" down the middle of each joist bay. Spray a 3 sec burst in each. Wait 12 hr and try the flex, it should be quite firm now. You may not want to do this ...


1

You could order an Asbestos test kit online, and find out. The results are probably as accurate, if not more accurate than the answers you'll get from a random community of people on the internet. PRO-LABĀ® offers just such an Asbestos Test Kit. I have no affiliation with PRO-LABĀ® or any of it's products, and do not recommend or endorse any of their ...


1

This is from their install guide: Finishing with Paint, Wallpaper or Texture Painting or Wallpapering If painting, apply a drywall primer suitable for high-moisture areas, as recommended by the paint manufacturer and paint HardieBacker board as you would drywall. If wallpapering, prime surface of HardieBacker board with a primer suitable for ...


1

I don't see why not. Hardiboard has even more texture than sheetrock for mud adhesion and at least as good of moisture absorption, so mud should adhere quite well. Certainly the flex of Hardiboard is less than sheetrock, so there should be no issues with flexing causing cracking of dried mud. But why would you want to? Hardiboard is at least three times ...


1

Edited to remove ANY subjectivity: HardieBacker is made from wood (cellulose fibers) and cement and carries a limited warranty for exterior use and only in certain climate zones. See HardieBacker's 10-Year Limited Warranty for Exterior Use Durock is made from cement and fiberglass mesh. Wonderboard and others are made similar to Durock. Subjectivity Here: ...


1

Whatever you end up doing to cover the area you should first take steps to completely remove the previous cat smell. Cat's have sensitive noses and if a new cat can smell even a trace of the previous smell they will get the immediate idea that it is OK to urinate in that area again. There are cleaners that work really well at removing the smell after you ...


1

Personally I would think that concrete poured up 1 to 2 inches thick will never stand up, even with a good amount of steel embedded in it. Commercial enterprises are making concrete elements but the things I've seen have always been 2.5 to 3 inches or more. Part of the problem with home processing of such things is that you do not have the needed exacting ...


1

You can attach the cement board like you said (minus silicone) and them use RedGuard waterproofing membrane or similar membrane. Roll or trowel on two coats and water will not get through. You must use a mesh reinforcement at corners. Just be sure to plan it out well, as this stuff is not forgiving to work with and will set quicker than you think.


1

I would probably attempt to just patch the one area and srape the rest off. Touch up with a grinder. However, that depends on how intact the existing CBU remains after scraping off the tiles and thinset. I would take the path of least resistance. If you try one way and it is taking way longer than the other way, switch.



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