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There are drywall/plaster corner protectors that are available for retail purchase and for commercial use. Basically they accomplish the same thing you did with your aluminum angle, except they are usually made of plastic. Other than that: plaster patch, sand smooth, plaster patch, sand smooth, ad nauseum...


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It could be. A few things you've left out where the year of the build of your home and the area you are in. These could help narrow down if this was used in your area at the time of construction. You have two options: Pickup a test kit from your local hardware store - or bring a sample to be tested by a lab. Call a qualified professional for an opinion: ...


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Any material you use will need to be fireproof, since it contacts the brick chimney. You can't count on the existing furnace to be the last one ever installed in that location, so any installation you do now will have to be safe for the next furnace, too... and since you can't know anything about the next furnace's specifcations, you need to take every ...


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The easiest option would be to run a new cable directly from the switch, up to the ceiling fixture. You'll want to either install a larger box and a new switch, or a double switch, so the light can be controlled independently. If you're working in a home constructed of solid wood framing, you should be able to run the new cable fairly easily. Since you ...


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Depending on the condition of the floor above your ceiling, it might be easier and cheaper to access the ceiling void through the floor. For example, if the floor upstairs is going to be renovated too, or if the floor cover is a carpet, which can be lifted and put back easily, or even better - if it is just the original floorboards, you can easily lift one ...


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First, never notch the bottom of beams. All electrical runs should be in the center third of any timber. This is for structural support as well as protecting the electrical. If you want to keep the wall outlet switched, consider knocking out the current one gang and replace with old work two gang. Run a new line up the wall, through the top plate into ...


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The higher section could easily be furred down (after removing the drywall) with strips of 1/2" plywood.


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There are a few solutions for such a problem. What I would do is mark the locations of the joists on the higher drywall, and then glue and screw new half inch drywall right on top of it. (Or 3/8" or 5/8" depending on if it's not exactly a half inch difference.) This will most likely be the cheapest and easiest option. You could also remove the drywall, ...


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You'll have a header running across the 90° transition in the framing direction, so this shouldn't be that difficult to fix. I'd remove the drywall from the last stud bay (shaded below)... ...and attach blocking to the header that will catch the sheetrock. Since you're getting air ingress there, I'd take the opportunity to insulate while you have it ...


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Usually, ONE of those clips will be spring-loaded while the other two are fixed (as shown in the photos).


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Stop and think for a moment. What are the consequences of the ceiling FAILING because you drilled holes in it and hung weights from those holes? Is it possible that the ceiling may fail catastrophically? You're also weakening the upstairs neighbor's floor, which may at times be very near its design limits. What happens if you're hanging from one point while ...


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If the old fixture worked, at least one of the white wires is hot. The easiest way to check which is hot is to use a non-contact tester. If the fixture is already removed, leave the two wires bundled together with a wire nut over the end. Put a wire nut on the single white wire. Turn the breaker back on. Only one of those should register on tester. That is ...


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There should be a bare ground wire up in the box somewhere. Connect the green wire to that. The lamp black goes to yellow. The lamp white goes to white. The little double white goes to your bulb. The black and the blue in the yellow wire nuts are just pass throughs not used for the light.


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If you don't know, get an electrician. Your life and property are at stake. I could make some educated guesses here but if you followed them, had a problem, and I found out about it, I'd feel bad.


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I am a retired electrician. The green wire is a ground wire. The purpose of it is to cause the breaker to trip or the fuse to blow if a short circuit develops. The majority of the time you can just hook up the white (neutral) and black or blue wires and never have any problem. HOWEVER! If a short circuit does develop you may burn the place down! If you ...


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Depends on construction details. if it's merely "the contractor was too cheap to provide attic access" (a very typical issue of cheesy contractors), you cut a hole and put in access, then apply insulation as you like. If it's a cathedral ceiling sort of arrangement (roof deck on one side of rafters, ceiling on the other) then some sort of spray/blown ...


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According to the installation instructions for a Hunter Universal Fan & Light Remote Control (Model 27185), the device should be wired as follows. Green/bare from ceiling to green/bare from receiver and fan. Black from ceiling to black (hot) from receiver. White from ceiling to white (neutral) from receiver. Blue from fan to red (light) from ...


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Wire it this way. Connect the green to the ceiling fan's green wires and the bare copper ground wire in the ceiling box. Connect all white wires together. This will be the fans white wire, the fan control white wire and the white wire in the ceiling box. If the fan control does not have a white wire, connect the fan's white wire to ceiling box white ...


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Doing my best to interpret your question: First, call the unit you wire in with the fan the "receiver," since it receives signals from the remote transmitter to control the fan (and usually a light). The instructions that came with your receiver should explain what the "common out" is for. Without more clear information it could either be intended for ...


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This is a repeat but it is a picture of what I have done. I also cut the top of the crown carefully into the sloped part to reduce the filler at the bottom edge.


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It looks like evidence of a leak. Be aware that because water runs downhill, it is often difficult to determine the source of a leak. For example if the leak is on the high roof, the water could run down inside the wall, then across a framing member to it's lowest point and then drip on the ceiling a full story and several feet away from the location where ...


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You might not have to create a fully vertical face to apply your crown. Crown molding is usually either 38 or 45 degrees (with some exceptions, so make sure and check) and it looks like the wall angle is greater than that so all you need to do is create a flat spot for the foot of the crown to land on. Here's a drawing: I wouldn't recommend 1/4 round ...


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I want to add on to ben's answer. You will always have sag with a 14 foot header. If it is a metal i-beam maybe 1/100th of an inch... Your wood/LVL will sag much more. What you are describing is ultra typical when there is a point load above and they used LVL. I don't know why cities keep allowing the use of LVL for anything more than 10 feet. It will ...


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Turn off the circuit and inspect the fixture. You most likely have corrosion forming in the light sockets. If it is corroding, it is best to replace.


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I would replace it. However, replacing it means turning the power off to that circuit and removing the fixture completely from the wiring after using a tester/multimeter to confirm power is off at the fixture connections. That gives you an opportunity to disassemble the removed fixture as far as you can and look for corrosion and dirt. It might be possible ...



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