New answers tagged

1

Ceiling fans are not generally silent. There is some motor hum, which may be transmitted to and reinforced by the ceiling, and there is some "white noise" as the blades cut through and move the air. Yes, some are quieter than others, by design or by the luck of installation. Whether yours is typical or not is best answered by your visiting a few friends ...


1

For small nail holes, use spackle. This is the simplest, cheapest way to fill small holes that aren't subject to significant movement. For cracks/seams, such as at corners or around window trim, use caulk (probably a paintable latex or latex+silicone caulk, as they're easy to work with). For deeper holes/cavities, such as around a pipe that is going ...


0

I would have to agree, the paper usually goes toward the conditioned side, in this case I would that is the subfloor side since the basement is so humid


1

The vapor barrier may have been done correctly; it depends on several factors like temperature, whether the basement is a living area, or if is a laundry area or has other sources of moisture build up. You need to ask your local inspector.


4

You would need to add a new wire from a new switch for the ceiling fan. If the (required) fan-rated box that will be installed is large enough you can simply leave the splice for the center light in that box just capped off.


2

Could the melting ice water have caused a permanent leak to have developed? (my emphasis) Leaks generally don't repair themselves. Since there is evidence of a leak, it is very likely this will recur. This means that the leak needs to be actively investigated and fixed to prevent further damage. You downstairs neighbor will probably get someone to ...


-2

the ice froze some water standing in the pipes and that created a clot, so when more water came through the pipes, it overflowed (overflew??)


3

could be the cold has shrunk something, maybe rubber isolation, and the water was able to go around it (something like that caused the challenger explosion) could be the cold has cooled down the neighbours ceiling and the moisture in the room condensed there, like when you use air conditioning


2

its called a z clip usually, but the socket side is a little different


-1

Close inspection of the pictures reveals that this is a plaster ring mounted to a 4-S or 5-S box. It is a strange plaster ring in that it does not have standard threaded fixture tabs. Open the plaster a bit more to reveal the screws in the corner that hold the ring to the square box below. Because the square box itself appears to be sufficiently anchored, ...


-1

This old electrical box is not rated for modern fans. It does not have the the 8-32 screw tabs on two sides. I suggest to remove this old metal box and replace it with a new shallow fan box. Clearly this old box is screwed to a floor or ceiling joist in an old home. The new ceiling box can also be screwed to the joist. Be sure to turn off the power before ...


-1

It looks to me like the current box would come out pretty easily. I'd probably get a new box of similar dimensions that's intended to carry a fan and mount it to the metal bar basically the same way that the current box does. Some are designed to accommodate surface mounting. Otherwise, it's just a matter of finding the right hardware configuration to ...


-1

Buy a ceiling hugger style fan (the ones without a stem or with the option to mount without the stem). Mount the fan's bracket directly to the ceiling with toggle bolts or other such fastener. This way the fan is not support by the box at all. Good luck with your project!


2

Without more information or a photo, my answer is to purchase a replacement ceiling tile, cut it to fill your gaps, put the original tile you removed in storage so you will have it if you move out of the space.


0

I don't know if you have done a lot of work in attics... But one little gap and you can feel the incredibly wrong air currents when there is a conditioned space next to a non-conditioned. This vortex of air flow can cause dramatic energy costs. So if you have an unconditioned outdoor space that has a drop ceiling next to a conditioned room the number one ...


0

If your in a cold weather area a layer of poly creates a vapor barrier, otherwise Drywall and plywood have no insulation value. Notes for the insulation between roof trusses: 4" cavity space: R-13 or R-15 batts, 6" cavity space: R-19 or R-21 batts, if it's a wide open attic, use an R-30 or R-38 batt.


0

Just to point out the other solution: Any the new fixture as a swag lamp, surface-mounted with a decorative treatment bringing the power cord across the ceiling and down to an outlet. That's how my living room is currently lit. Or do a fake coffered/beamed ceiling, running the wire through the "beams".


3

I much prefer to use the mesh tape that has a sticky back on it. Cut your tape to size, press it in place, and then spread your compound over it. The paper tape is messier, harder to work with, and can slip around. Also, my experience with spackling vs premixed drywall compound is that the spackling is dryer. It makes filling larger holes easier. It doesn't ...


0

I would guess that one is actually hot one neutral and not marked properly... The black to black connection is most likely going to a switch, and out of the switch for what ever reason they ran a white and did not label it... BUT it is always concerning when you do not see proper colors :) I would check the switch...


1

You're likely seeing what's called a "switch loop". So the white wire of the cable running between the switch and the light, is used as the switched hot. The wire should be reidentified as such, but it's often not. If you're connecting the new light exactly as the old light was, you're probably okay. Use a voltmeter or multimeter to confirm, or have a look ...


5

There's really only one right way to do this. It takes a bit of time, but it's not difficult or complicated. You'll want to replace the tape to ensure that the seam doesn't propagate through the paint. Pick up some premixed topping compound (available in gallon or smaller buckets), and a short roll of joint tape (cheap enough to not bother experimenting ...


1

Get yourself a small bucket of pre-mixed tape compound in the Sheetrock section of Home Depot/Lowes, and 2 sizes of putty knives if you don't already own some. You would then put a thin coat or two overlapping the missing piece. Let it dry and sand lightly. It may take a few coats and sanding sessions to get near perfect.



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