Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

68.57 Pounds per square foot if evenly distributed - call it 70 (or 75) and pull up a calculator (or drop by your lumberyard and have them run it on their I-joist software, which might well be the most affordable solution.) Or hire an engineer. Underbuilt haylofts do have a tendency to demonstrate that they are underbuilt; so don't underbuild it.


1

You are most likely hitting the metal flange around the vent that is used to secure the vent to the studs. If this is what you are hitting, it will be right behind the drywall, then drilling a new hole for the screw is the right action.


0

[in the UK] I've just bought some 'Ronseal 3 in 1 mould killer' spray from B&Q -- also available on Amazon -- which has worked well on my polystyrene ceiling tiles in the bathroom. These were quite mouldy in places (due to problems with my roof). The spray worked really well (and the spray mechanism was very effective - giving a good-coverage fine mist ...


0

Drywall anchors are used in vertical walls and the rating is based on a combination of shear load (downward on the screw and anchor) and some tension load outward (based on an assumption of a load close to the wall). Ceiling mounts are pure tension loads downward and the weak spot is the drywall, not the anchor. A thin diameter of crumbly plaster around the ...


0

Most drywall anchors are meant to be used vertically not horizontally. Walls yes ceilings NO. If you bought the anchors look at the box it should tell you. As for me I use toggle bolts and washers. Find the weight of the fixture and get the toggle bolt and washer to match.


-1

First, an answer because I realize some people just cannot get this stuff. If it were me, I would build the wall like normal with a continuous double 2x4 top plate and just shoot about 6 +/- nails with our gun through the top section of the studs into the drywall. Second, a thought. What would the weight be from on that wall. Maybe a person pushing off ...


-1

I would simply ask if you can have two beams on each wall that hit the ceiling. These could span to the 1/3 mark on the walls and would keep it from flexing. Simple 4x4 would probably look the best and should still pass fire code.


2

It sounds like two of your red wires form a switch loop to one of your switches. The remaining red wire is the hot (I believe called active in Australia?) coming into your ceiling. By connecting them all together, you have wired your light (and switch) directly to your unswitched power, which is why it stays on. You'll need a multimeter, voltage tester, or ...


4

I was in total agreement with Ecnerwal, that those bumps were to hold it in wall board. Finding this picture tells a different story: (notice the bumps and the threaded insert) My best guess is that up in the ceiling somewhere, is the rest of the part; those bumps thread into it, or you can just push (see, 4.a). Be gentle with it, those are 50 bucks. ...


0

No the box and support system is not rated for 45lb Chandelier. Because you do not have access to box, you can cut a little bit bigger hole and remove the old box and support system. Then install a Retrofit Ceiling Fan Saf-T-Brace. UL listed to support lighting fixtures 150 lbs. or less on 16 in. centers and 50 lbs. or less on 24 in. centers; supports fans ...


2

I will not be able to paint over the black paint and restore it to its white colour. It's just paint on drywall. If you decide to remodel, you can paint over it. You will need to paint the whole wall to make sure the color matches, and it may take an extra coat or two to completely cover the black, but if you do any remodeling, you will most likely be ...


2

Your pelmet needs a top to it. Other terms are box valance or cornice. You take a standard valance which is just a curtain rod cover and put a top on it. Since it's a box with an open bottom that covers the curtain rods and the top of the window opening, it should be a very effective light control device. Paint the inside of the thing matte black, make it ...


0

Generally speaking, you must connect ceiling live cable (CL) to fixture live (FL) and ceiling neutral (CN) to fixture neutral (FN). As comments state, your fixture may not have a ground cable (strictly speaking), but some kind of screw, most probably with proper designation indented on it or with a proper sticker. If that's so, your ground cable from ceiling ...


2

Extension cords are not supposed to be used for permanent fixtures. These fixtures are supposed to be hard wired or directly plugged into a permanent outlet. A common approach to solve this problem would be to install a switched outlet on the ceiling near the fluorescent lights. In many jurisdictions, you could use non-metallic cable to run the outlet and ...


1

If the lights don't work at all, when the fan is not on: (and assuming the incoming power goes to the switches and does not come from the ceiling) The switch for the fan, powers the switch for the lights. Instead, the incoming power at the wall switch's J-box needs a pig-tail, to feed the two switches. Beyond that, I'd need a detailed description ...


0

First I don't totally disagree with Tyler but his answer is a bit ridiculous. Only a concrete salesman would tell you to repour your foundation due to hairline cracks in drywall. Maybe the issue has something to do with the foundation shifting seasonally. But all houses move a little throughout weather changes - humidity and temp. It is virtually ...



Top 50 recent answers are included