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If this is a modern home, then there is no issue. If you have turn of the century wiring, then that is another story.


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You could also try to get a board to go between the joists if you can't hit them directly. The holding strength of drywall isn't much in this direction. Really if you look at drywall it's about 2 pieces of paper with a little bit of "stuff" in between. If you have the vertical space you could push a piece of wood through a hole near one of the anchors or ...


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In most cases, this would pose no problem. Lighting circuits in most homes are 15 amp lines. That means the line can theoretically handle about 1800 watts at one time without tripping the circuit breaker or posing a hazard. That equals 18 100 watt lights at the same time. Or one 1200 watt vacuum cleaner and 6 100 watt bulbs. At the same time. Wattage ...


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Yes it could matter your best course of action would be to determine all loads connected to that circuit and potential loads to see if the circuit will be likely to handle the additional load. Connected loads will most likely be other lights. You can either identify them and add the wattage or better turn them all on and check the amperage that breaker with ...


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There are a few reasons you might not want to use an LED bulb in a fixture: If the fixture is dimmable and the LED bulb is not, the bulb may flicker or not come on. If the fixture is enclosed, an LED bulb may overheat. (LED bulbs generate much less heat than incandescents, but they do generate some... and they're a lot more sensitive to overheating). Some ...


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If the LED bulb is dimable it might work. Typically when you see incandescent only it is modifying the AC wave form. Incandescent bulbs don't care and can work over a pretty broad range. Where bulbs that have a solid state controller or transformer in it are pretty limited to a standard AC wave form. And if that LED/CF bulb can be dimmed, they they can ...


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Having been in the business for over twenty years I would say "ceiling clouds" is a relatively new term, although I would instantly know what the customer was referring to if they used this to describe it. Personally I would refer to it as a "ceiling raft".


2

You've pretty much got it. If you can twist wires with wire nuts and connect them to a switch you have the technical skills needed. The hardest part is usually pulling the wire from the wall into the ceiling. Get an "old work" ceiling/light box. Cut a hole in the desired ceiling location, ensuring no joist will interfere with anchoring the old work box ...


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I would look for a ceiling light that is mounted with regular expansion plug screws (or whatever kind of screw is applicable to your ceiling material) instead of older methods such as hooks or threaded pipe. Then it's just a matter of running the wires (or rather, some proper electrical conduit such as corrugated tubing) from your switch to that spot over ...


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A cable needs to terminate in a box or an approved fixture (which has the equivalent of a box built in). In your picture, the wires seem to hanging down with no such device. You can attach a very small box on the surface of the ceiling. The cable (the outside casing including the wires) is then attached to the base plate of the box with a connector. The ...


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I don't know what the right answer is, but I'd probably go with attaching an adhesive screen, using non-shrinking plaster/spackle over that to fill in the area, then trying to tool the surface to vaguely resemble the rest of the design. If you were trying for a museum-quality repair the answer would probably be to actually take a mold of the opposite side ...


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There may also be an issue with the wiring above the ceiling; the copper may have oxidized, causing gradually poorer contact between two conductors. first up: try changing at least one light bulb. As you remove the old bulb, twist it several times back & forth at the "nearly tight" position to help rub the contacts clean, and do the same with the new ...


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There are drywall/plaster corner protectors that are available for retail purchase and for commercial use. Basically they accomplish the same thing you did with your aluminum angle, except they are usually made of plastic. Other than that: plaster patch, sand smooth, plaster patch, sand smooth, ad nauseum...


1

It could be. A few things you've left out where the year of the build of your home and the area you are in. These could help narrow down if this was used in your area at the time of construction. You have two options: Pickup a test kit from your local hardware store - or bring a sample to be tested by a lab. Call a qualified professional for an opinion: ...


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Any material you use will need to be fireproof, since it contacts the brick chimney. You can't count on the existing furnace to be the last one ever installed in that location, so any installation you do now will have to be safe for the next furnace, too... and since you can't know anything about the next furnace's specifcations, you need to take every ...


2

The easiest option would be to run a new cable directly from the switch, up to the ceiling fixture. You'll want to either install a larger box and a new switch, or a double switch, so the light can be controlled independently. If you're working in a home constructed of solid wood framing, you should be able to run the new cable fairly easily. Since you ...


2

Depending on the condition of the floor above your ceiling, it might be easier and cheaper to access the ceiling void through the floor. For example, if the floor upstairs is going to be renovated too, or if the floor cover is a carpet, which can be lifted and put back easily, or even better - if it is just the original floorboards, you can easily lift one ...



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