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I guess the first question would be if you have a engineered truss system or ceiling joists; they aren't the same thing (as I've learned). Is there livable area on top of the garage or an attic/loft? If they are just ceiling joists you can drill a hole right through the middle of the joists (don't cut out notches). I've done 3/4 inch holes with an auger ...


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Likely so, yes. A loose connection is quite dangerous- you could be getting arcs, which can start fires. I would recommend against using the fan until you can check the connections. More and more state and local electrical codes are requiring arc fault circuit interrupt breakers. While they're more expensive, they really do work to prevent fires.


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Both black and red are typically used to indicate hot. Though you can't be positive without actually testing it with a multimeter. Red is usually used when there are two hots (14/3 wire instead of 14/2). Both green and bare copper are used to indicate ground. So it sounds like you wired it correctly. The green wire from the line (source) should also be ...


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If your insurance company gave you money to repair a plaster ceiling with drywall - they are probably just trying to get of as cheap as possible, and hoping to get away with it. Joining the two systems together or even replacing the entire ceiling with drywall - is usually much more labor intensive, than just plastering the damaged section and blending it ...


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Another alternative would be to fur out the ceiling and install a drywall ceiling on top of your existing ceiling. This would give you an area to run new, concealed wiring. Another benefit to this is that you wouldn't need to scrape the existing ceiling which can be really messy (not to mention a lot of work), and you will need to mud/tape and paint ...


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While that might work, I doubt your HOA would allow grooving the ceiling because the concrete is part of the common structure. Instead, install flat conduit. Or flatwire. Or maybe you might like a beam which could conceal a wire.


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Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


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This question really begs to have the analysis done by a structural engineer. That being said I can venture to suggest two ideas that may be suitable to your situation. A) Probably the best way to provide adequate support for the drywall on the ceiling would be to screw flat 2x4's at right angles to the existing rafters onto the bottom of the lower rafter ...


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Well, this is thicker than a skim coat, but it's normal. The compound will contract somewhat as it dries. The normal and correct procedure here calls for multiple coats. It is time consuming, but the only way to do it. At any rate, inconsistencies will certainly exist between coats. Its the final coat and finish that is important. If this were ...


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The commonly recommended solution is to find the wood the ceiling was screwed into (using a studfinder, or a magnet to find those screws), and screw the hanging hardware into that. That avoids questions of whether the plasterboard can take the weight, whether there's space behind the board to maneuver your proposed anchor, etc. A small hole is not hard to ...


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You might have answered your own question... what about a (larger) needle? Tie the fishing wire round the middle of the needle (and perhaps use a dab of glue to hold it in place if it won't hold itself). If you can't find a large enough needle, try a small gauge knitting needle? Again it might need a dab of glue to hold the wire in place in the centre.


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I won't say whether or not these issues are significant because there's always a possibility that they could hint at more sinister problems. But I will say that, if you find a house that's more than five years old that doesn't have a little movement in the floor and few cracks in the drywall: buy it. Because it's the only one in the world. Houses settle, ...


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How big an area? If it is small, can you replace the studs with pine? Cut the old out with a Sawzall. You could also use drywall adhesive.


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If you're not snapping the heads off (torque), your drill just doesn't cut it. If you're stripping the heads, you're not pushing hard enough (under powered drills require more pressure to avoid this and also lose torque towards the end, helping you snap the heads off). If the drywall pops, use two or more screws 2-3" apart, slowly sinking each one to ...


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I suspect the studs are really hard old-growth wood Lubricating screws can really help when driving them into wood. I've seen various lubricants suggested. For exterior projects I've used LM grease and petroleum jelly (vaseline) but I'm not sure if there are any problems using either in your situation. The other common solution is to drill pilot holes ...


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One thing I do in removing lights switch covers etc is take a razor knife & cut around the edges then as I pull coveers away I don't ruin 6 inches of paint wallpaper



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