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2

Possibly. They do make gadgets designed to control a ceiling fan + light separately, using wiring meant for a light only (which is your case even though it's a fan only). They include a control module which goes behind the fan shroud, and an intelligent light switch. The module doesn't care if the fan and light are separate items. They also make lights ...


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This is not really an answer to your question but rather an observation that requires some attention. The three areas highlighted are not legitimate electrical connections.


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You take up the cable to the right length using the bracket in your last picture. Then you can pull the conical cover up. When I've used these, there's always been either (i) a little plastic screw in the hole you can see at the bottom of picture 3 or (ii) some form of friction clip built into the point of the cone.


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You're really better off going with an LED bulb for a couple of reasons. First, they last 20 years and are immune to vibration. Second, they make less heat, if you're running your fan to cool off. They are now reasonably priced, and come in any color you want, so you don't need that "blue-ish" color if you don't want it, and they even come in old-timey ...


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There are industrial duty lamps they are built to take some vibration. We use these in areas that have vibration. They do cost more but hold up better than off the shelf lamps.


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I would use the faster setting durabond mix it a little dryer than what you would use on walls and press it into the metal. The faster setting is a harder to sand but it will hold up and look fine when painted. My mom's house has the steel mesh with cement, It is really hard to work with because the cement eats the metal disks and the metal eats the cement ...


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I've found it to be easier to just tear out the plaster and drywall it. It's a lot more work but in my run-ins with plaster in old structures it was always a pain. I would drywall it; it will save you hassle in the future.


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Ceiling fans are not generally silent. There is some motor hum, which may be transmitted to and reinforced by the ceiling, and there is some "white noise" as the blades cut through and move the air. Yes, some are quieter than others, by design or by the luck of installation. Whether yours is typical or not is best answered by your visiting a few friends ...


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For small nail holes, use spackle. This is the simplest, cheapest way to fill small holes that aren't subject to significant movement. For cracks/seams, such as at corners or around window trim, use caulk (probably a paintable latex or latex+silicone caulk, as they're easy to work with). For deeper holes/cavities, such as around a pipe that is going ...


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I would have to agree, the paper usually goes toward the conditioned side, in this case I would that is the subfloor side since the basement is so humid


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The vapor barrier may have been done correctly; it depends on several factors like temperature, whether the basement is a living area, or if is a laundry area or has other sources of moisture build up. You need to ask your local inspector.



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