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1

There are two very important dimensions left out of the "Obstruction Details". See picture below. Overall height of overhead clearance. (Directly related to number of courses of cinder blocks in the wall). Width of the opening. (This is of lesser importance than the overall height). The dimensions I show are just pure guesses based on what one may ...


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Looks like a water stain. Since you know the cause, just get matching ceiling paint and paint over it, or repaint the whole ceiling if you can't get the color matched to your satisfaction. Or ignore it until you're ready to repaint.


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Explain the situation to your city's building department and it is likely you can be granted a variance. If you leave the bottom of the brick obstruction unfinished (you can even paint it if you want), there is only a half inch difference of 6' 3.5" compared to the required 6' 4". There is a good chance a variance will be granted.


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With a couple of $15 buckets of drywall mud and a few hours of elbow grease, you can apply the mud right over the paneling. To make the result look even remotely good, you'll want to hit it with a few coats, waiting for each coat to dry, and get the surface finish as smooth as possible. Assuming you don't have any experience applying drywall texture, don't ...


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I can't say much about the ceiling, but we recently "refinished" our paneled basement simply by painting the walls: a light sanding to break the glossy surface, two coats of primer and two coats of white paint did the trick. You can definitely see the old grooves in the paneling, but it looks good enough to us that we used the same technique on the paneling ...


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1.5 wire needs to be protected by a 16 Amp (or weaker) breaker. You are fine on that front. Your total wattage will be 10*40W*2 = 800W; on a 220V line this will mean 800W / 220V = 3.6 Amps. So overload is not an issue assuming there is nothing else on that breaker. (If there is then add the wattage to the 800W and divide again) You should also extend the ...


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You should be able to just pick off the worst bits and apply new joint compound. Do it in 2 thin layers if the plaster is thick. It will look a bit patchy if you don't sand and paint afterwards.


2

If you don't mind the look, I'd suggest a 2x6 run perpendicular to your joists. Ideally, you'd get 3 joists (so a 2x6 slightly longer than 4', assuming you've got 16" spacing) with at least 2 good 3.5" #10 screws each. (Since these are pretty big screws, you'll want to drill pilot and clearance holes.) To attach the rock rings, use 6/7mm -ish cord through ...


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I would not add drywall over plaster, as the guy said before. You have to not only look at the depth of electrical outlets, but now your door jambs are the wrong size, and window sills and trim will all have to be redone.


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My home has a mix of 1/2 and 5/8 drywall on the ceiling and it is completely related to the spacing of the ceiling joists. If they are 16 on center, the builder used 1/2. If they are wider than 16, then they used 5/8. The 5/8 will prevent sagging between wider ceiling joists.


1

I have a similar Ikea fixture, but it came with a metal sleeve that tightens with a screw--this part sits below the cap, but this light has a rod (rigid, not the cord itself) for this sleeve to work on. Did you buy it new? If for some reason you didn't have the instructions and therefore couldn't verify if a piece was missing, you can find those here: ...


10

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


2

Looks like a plenum return to me, especially since you said there's a ceiling grill into this area. Basically the false ceiling is acting as part of the ductwork. Very common in commercial buildings, less so in residential... but not at all unreasonable.


1

Looks like somebody forgot to connect an HVAC supply duct -- probably to the vent you opened to take the picture! The "thick walls" on the duct are probably insulation, which is why I suspect it is a supply duct.


0

I would add a 2x4. Run it across your joists, screw into joists, and then a couple of screws through your box. You just need a scrap 2x4 and long screws. I wouldn't rely on nailed up box to support 45 pounds for an extended time, really it looks like drywall is holding it up right now.


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You can cut through ceiling a hole round 60cm x 60 cm (round 24 x 24 inches).A hole should be this big just to be on a safe side, because this is max distance between two substructure elements. If you find this elements in a smaller opening even better. At this point you have two choices: either you can fix curtain in ceiling substructure elements, or which ...


2

Realizing none of this is intended to support a person, or animal, or support anything over a person or animal. Which answer would you like? In order of suggested preference, and holding strength Open up the ceiling enough [24" x 8"] to get a piece of lumber screwed between 2 joists - then patch Open up the ceiling enough [10" x 6"] to get a piece of ...



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