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It sounds like you have a hot wire that is bypassing the wall switch. Be very careful because you make think you have a dead circuit when you actually have a live one. Make sure you are using a circuit tester before you grab a wire. You are going to have to determine that you have both the black (hot) and the White (neutral) wires that are actually ...


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In some installations, there will be two switches for a fan - one for the fan and another for the light. The ceiling fan would have four wires (blue is common color for the 4th wire), and they are normally labeled Light, Fan, Common, and Ground. One wall switch will control the black wire, and the second switch will control red. Your new fan either ...


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This kind of tester will tell if the wire is hot. A bad return path (white wire) could be the cause. Also the lamp can be bad, but you said both quit so I would check to see if the neutral wiggled loose.


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What you propose is indeed possible. How difficult it is, depends on what wiring is currently in place. You should start by connecting all the bare/green grounding conductors in the switch box together, including a pigtail to both switches. Other than that, it sounds like the wiring in the switch box is good to go. If you want to control the fan with a ...


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I would consider getting a metal plate adapter similar to this: You can mount this to the screw holes in the ceiling electrical box. Then in turn you can mount the fan hanger bracket in the correct orientation. As shown you can see there are plenty of options to adjust the positions of everything including the possibility to install captive bolts and nuts ...


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****This answer pertains to wire color coding for North American electrical Standards.**** You can re-wire the fan to make it simple. The fan will have to be opened-up at the ceiling cover-plate. Most wiring for ceiling fans are such that the blue wire from the FAN powers the light. This should be presently connected to the HOT (black) from the switch. ...


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I'd consider modifying the mounting bracket to be dangerous. The key is there for a reason - it counters the torque of the fan spinning when the motor is turned on and keeps it from twisting in the hanger. There's nothing wrong with mounting the bracket sideways at all - the issue is that the downrod ball you have isn't adjustable in that dimension. There ...


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You are going to be mounting the hanging ball 90 degrees from its intended orientation. As long as the bracket would not allow the hanging ball to come out, I think your idea to cut off the key is good. I guess that key is just to keep the ball from rotating when the fan is turned on? I installed one recently that didn't have a key like that. Another option ...


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No. I'd hope to christ they used that ground conductor as the neutral and the two insulated ones as hots, which is probable because you're not dead. But no. It's not safe what they did. Undo it, and use the pullchains, or use a wireless controller


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I have a ceiling fan with four sockets. One socket would not work at all, and one caused a CFL light to flicker and hum when in use, and burn out in about a month. I disassembled the fan to check the wiring. Redoing the lamp wiring (5 white wires into a twist-on wire connector, and 5 black wires into another twist-on connector) was enough to get the ...


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This will work, as long as you don't overstuff the switch box Your proposed scheme will function, electrically speaking. However, there is one Code concern with your scheme: box fill. Single gang boxes are not hard to overfill with wires, and introducing the extra cable into your switch box makes it likely that you will do just that. The simplest fix for ...


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Your builder should be ashamed of themselves for the ugly hack they pulled here -- using the EGC as a neutral's a big no-no, as that denies all the safety benefits of having a ground wire, and would trip a GFCI or AFCI breaker placed on the circuit. However, it is possible to fix this without opening the wall to run new wires, in one of two ways: Install a ...


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As far as code goes, the wiring must be done in a box and that box must be rated to support the weight of the fan. It's not code compliant if it were to be inspected. But on to what this means to you, since most likely an inspector wouldn't check it.. You could say that the joist will support the fan and that the wires are secured, but if any were to come ...


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Electrical boxes serve several functions. They protect wiring where insulation has been removed. They prevent inadvertent contact with exposed components. They contain sparks when the worst occurs. And they provide standard mounting points for fixtures. I'd be inclined to "code things up" with a wraparound box like so: Nonmetallic ceiling joist box ...



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