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I think you are out of luck, since this would mean having low and high voltage in the same box, not "separated by a listed barrier (or divider)" as when a ganged box is suitably divided for dual use. See this question/answer... Installing Coax & Cat6 in 2-Gang with Electrical?


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Typically you'd run 14/2 to the vanity, and 14/3 to the fan/light combo. In the switch box, Connect all the grounded (neutral) conductors. Connect all the grounding conductors. Connect the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the vanity to the switch. Connect one of the ungrounded (hot) conductors from the light/fan to the switch. Connect the other ...


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First order of business: install an old work ceiling fan box! (The linked box is the first one that turned up on Google -- there are several makes and models of old work ceiling fan boxes available, all of the basic design depicted.) Right now, not only are you violating NEC section 300.15, Boxes, Conduit Bodies, or Fittings - Where Required. A box ...


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If you only have red green and white wired coming from the ceiling, that means it's only meant for one switch. The other switch may be for an outlet in the room. Sometimes an outlet is set to a switch so you can connect a lamp and control it from a wall switch; if this is the case you will not be able to control the light and fan separately except with a ...


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Remote receivers control the light and fan usually, it only gets one power source. Once installed only one switch will work. It sucks but that's how they are. You are bypassing the ability to control both functions from wall to the more "convenient" option of a remote. The switches are both use less at this point. Use the remote as the switch. My fan had ...


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You could (spend money) replace the controller and the switch. Or remove the controller and just wire everything to the fan switch (free). Either way, if the wire is in conduit and you have to pull the fan down, just run another wire.


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It's very difficult to determine what type of ducting was used and if that ducting was properly installed or has an obstructions just by the era the building was built. Since the fan is broken you can try removing it to see what size ducting is currently in place. If your current fan was doing a good job before it broke... meaning you didn't have moisture ...


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Calculate the CFM Needed. (Length X Width X Height)/7.5 (7 x 5 x 8)/7.5 = 37.3 CFM Did the 7x5 include a Shower/tub area too? If so, the 50 CFM should be fine. That Fan is a bit overkill for your bathroom, that said Mine is a 190CFM for the same size. The issue you are going to run into is that the fan you chose has a 6" Duct coming from it. ...


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If you want to use the Remote, then you have the issue of having to find it to turn everything on. You mentioned in your second choice: "light... by a hard-wired wall switch and the remote, and the fan wired hot and controlled by the remote." sounds like your first option? You can Control the Light with the Dimmer hard wired switch and the Fan with the ...


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Simply mount the fan to the concrete ceiling using concrete mounting fasteners (i also add concrete adhesive to provide a moresolid connection particularly in a ny building.) I live in south fl and concrete ceilings are the norm in condo buildings. 1/4 concrete fasteners and adhesive put in holes to solidify the connection. My fn has been up for 5 years- ...


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Switches generate small, momentary arcs as part of their normal operation; AFCIs are designed to recognize and ignore these momentary arcs. However, holding the switch between positions (or taking a while to transition between positions) can lead to the arc sustaining itself, which damages the switch contacts and also causes the AFCI to trip because it sees ...



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