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The primary consideration is not the static load, but the dynamic load from a heavy, rotating load. That's why there are electrical boxes specifically designed and designated by code for ceiling fan loads. See http://homerepair.about.com/od/electricalrepair/ss/elec_box_ltg.htm#step5


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You have two issues: Strength of the hickey - Some hickeys are cast from cheap pot metal and would be sketchy. Some are steel but bent in the shape of a U with one open side, also problematic. Heavier cast iron ones with support on both sides wold probably be better. Strength of the crossbar - Also an issue. consider a heavier duty type or even a full ...


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Since there's no grounding conductor in the box (i.e. the box is not grounded), touching a meter lead to metal is basically useless.Your COM probe should go to the grounded (neutral) (white wire in your case), then you can use the other probe to test for voltage. It sounds to me like there might be a problem with the wiring inside the fixture, since you ...


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There is a junction box somewhere at the end of the cable, best to find it and start your wiring from there. You can cut the cable, and use the wires, but it is difficult without the right tool, and then you have to hope you have enough length and use the proper fittings to mount it to the new ceiling box.


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Many multi speed ceiling fan motors will have a ground wire inside of the housing that simply attaches to a sheet metal screw on an internal part of the housing. Because this is fairly common, when adding remote circuits or dimmable lighting that also has a ground lead, most often the instructions will say to connect the ground lead to the housing also. I ...


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NO! You cannot, for any reason, connect a grounding conductor to a neutral (grounded) conductor anywhere other than in the service equipment. If you do so, the metal box and any metal connected to the box (including the fan housing) will become a current carrying conductor. This is very bad, and can result in personal injury and/or death. I doubt the ...


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Although the speed of an induction motor can be continuously varied a bit with an SCR phase control circuit, such as used in a light dimmer, most multi-speed fan motors use tapped windings to provide different speeds in discrete steps. The 4-speed motor will have four tap wires coming out of it, plus a common wire; the 3-speed control will have three tap ...


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http://www.chiefmfg.com/Products/CMA106 bolt directly to the ceiling junction box, then any mount with 1.5" NPT would work.


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So the blue wire in your fan fixture is power to the light on the fan. The black wire is power to the fan. Current code calls for a neutral wire in any switch box, even if you don't use it yet and have to cap it with a wire nut. If you want to control the lights and the fan independently from the wall switch (so the fan doesn't come on ever time you flip ...


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Odd that you said you had a white wire that was hot. Both white wires should be neutral and have no voltage. Seems to me wires would go like this: connect all black wires together. That will run hot all the time to the fan as well as sending power downstream. Next tie all white wires together. That will provide neutral to the fan as well as pass neutral ...



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