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Another thing that seriously needs to get corrected is the totally unacceptable workmanship of the wire attachment at the switches. The wire insulation should be right up at the screw head. The tail end of the wire should only extend out from under the screw heads by a very small amount. If this wiring was prepared by someone that you paid to do ...


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I suggest first off to take the remote control kit out of the installation to see if you can get the fan going without it. Once that is successful then re-attempt introducing the remote unit.


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Fan/light with no remote Put everything back the way it was. Connect the white from the fan/light to the white from the ceiling. Connect the green/bare from the fan/light to the green/bare from the ceiling. Connect the black and blue wires from the fan/light to the black or red wire from the ceiling that was connected to the black wire from the old ...


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Based on your descriptions (the pictures are hard to read), there should be red and black wires in the ceiling box. It sounds like you should have tapped the fan's AC IN L into the black wire for the fan's switched hot line, but you tapped into the red instead. If that is the case, just switch the fan power line over to the black. Be sure to leave the ...


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I know when the home I live in now was built (mid 60's) grounding was not required for lighting circuits in my area. The electrician that wired the house actually pulled the grounding wires back out of the box (non-metallic) and bound them together behind the box. So none of my lights or switches in the house are grounded. It would be safer to have the ...


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In a perfect world, with perfect electronics, there would be no need for a grounding conductor. It's there to deal with imperfections. The most likely case for a ground fault in this installation would be if the black conductor lost some insulation and shorted itself against the frame of the fan. In such a situation, the casing could become electrified, ...


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The wires from the ceiling box are probably a "hot" wire (black), a neutral wire (white), a ground wire (copper), and a switched-hot (red)(see description here). On the fan you probably have a neutral (white), a "hot" lead for the motor and a "hot" lead for the light that is not there (blue & black). Most fans can be equipped with light kits so they ...


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Absolutely do not leave the wires alone wrapped in electrical tape. Electrical tape does not have enough longevity to safely protect the exposed leads and can create a hazard in the future. The blue wire exists to support the future addition of a light. The polite thing to do for your future self or future owner of your home would be to connect the blue and ...


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Green to green, white to white. Assuming you have a two gang switch (two switches at wall, only one used). Blue and Black from fan connected either to the red or black wire from wall. Other wire needs to be wire capped. The black wire from the fan is the hot for the fan motor, the blue is for an optional light kit.


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A/C devices like lights and fan motors need to be connected to a "hot" (live) wire and a "neutral" (normally white) wire to operate. The ground wire is for safety. At your wall box you have a black and a pink wire. These are most likely a black "hot" and a pink "switched hot". A switched hot is only hot when your wall switch is ON, it delivers live power to ...


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Connect the white wire to the white wire. If you want the wall switch to turn off the light/fan, then hook the pink wire in the box to the black wire on your controller. If you want to prevent the switch from turning off the light/fan then connect black to black. Which ever wire you don't use should be capped with a spare wire nut and wrapped with ...


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The reference to a switch loop in the related question describes a pair of wires that are both hot or live. The white wire is serving as a black and should have a black marking or tape on it. The switch is serving as a break in the hot line. Every operating device (like a fan or lamp) in standard wiring needs a hot line and a neutral line, and usually a ...


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NO PUTTY! You have a loose electrical connection and a loose mechanical connection. Mechanical First you need to fix the mechanical attachment mechanism. It may be a loose nut on a threaded pipe holding the individual fixture to the base. It could be some other locking mechanism, such as bolts or screws. In some fixtures, the sockets are held in by ...


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Start by turning off the power at the breaker, and verifying it's off with a non-contact voltage tester. Connect all the bare or green grounding conductors together. Connect the white wire from the ceiling to the white wire on the input side of the remote receiver module and the white wire in the fan. Connect the black wire from the ceiling to the black ...


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Using foam in a can, like Great Stuff http://www.homedepot.com/p/GREAT-STUFF-Big-Gap-Filler-Insulating-Foam-Sealant-16-oz-248314/100029171 can be used to fill in gaps to help prevent air leaks.


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Yes, you can purchase a remote control module that will allow you to independently control the fan and the light. Most modules only require a hot, neutral, and ground wire to operate. Here's a wiring diagram from a random fan remote, installation guide (PDF). The receiver gets power from the house wiring, then determines which leads to energized ...


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You should re-feed this fan from a lighting circuit or other 15A circuit. A ceiling fan CANNOT be supplied from a kitchen or DR receptacle circuit. Whoever did this was clueless with regard to codes and proper wiring.



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