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18

First of all, buy a good drip free caulking gun. Make sure you cut the tip of the caulk on an angle. If you want a perfectly straight line on each side, put painters tape on each side of the area you want to caulk. Then just pull it up before the caulk dries. If you do not want to use your finger to smooth it, the little squeegie like tools that you can ...


17

I think you're confusing the terms "caulk" and "silicone" for the colors "white" and "clear". A lot of caulks are made from silicone rubber, and they can be white or clear (or other colors). To answer your question, I would use a clear caulk around the base of the toilet as it will look better next to the wood. I've always used caulk because it prevents ...


15

Definitely use a damp finger, and have a paper towel ready to wipe off your finger if you used too much caulk. Also, with silicone and difficult to clean surfaces, you want to tape both sides of your caulk line first. Remove the tape immediately after using your finger. This isn't needed on trim/painted walls since the caulk will disappear under the paint. ...


13

I just caulked my shower last night. I used GE Silicone II caulk from Home Depot. I read up on this a little before picking out what kind I needed. From what I can tell, silicone caulk is good for bathrooms because: It's permanently waterproof It doesn't crack or shrink Another factor which may play into your choice of caulk could be whether or not it's ...


11

There's nothing you can do now other than remove it and re-apply. The pro's often just use their finger to smooth it out. For those of us who don't have the magical touch, they make tools that allow you to put a nice finish on. There are a variety of different tools - this is just the first one that came up in a search.


11

In addition to DA01's suggestion, there are also smaller tubes of caulk that may be thin/small enough to angle into the casing corner. More costly, but you only need a little (if it fits).


10

You don't have a caulking problem, you have a structural one. The walls and floor shouldn't be moving so much that caulk cracks. And caulk isn't an adhesive for holding up the soap dish or towel bar. Finally, a rocking toilet indicates the floor either wasn't properly leveled or that it's not structurally sound. If these are the issues you are noticing, then ...


9

As requested, here is my comment as an answer: I thought "caulk" was called "gap filler" internationally (a white substance like wet plaster). But your description sounds like silicone (and silicone-based sealants). If so, the magic trick for mess free edges isn't painter's tape, it's apply the silicone, then spraying the area with all-purpose cleaner ...


7

The rubbery sealant is bathroom (or general-purpose) silicone caulk. As to why they don't use it between every tile, the answer is that it shouldn't be necessary; except for the one row of tile overhanging the "backsplash" of a "built-in" tub (helps keep minor splashes and overflow from seeping into the wall behind the tub), all tiles should be fixed to the ...


7

If you do it your self (not endorsing, and see comment by The Evil Greebo) you could put a more secure plug in by using hydraulic cement. To ensure that it does not come out, holes or cracks are usually back cut (the hole is made wider below the opening so that its diameter is greater than the diameter of the opening). This can be done with a small masonry ...


7

If it's an interior door, I'd suggest not bothering. If you can't easily get the tube in there, my guess is you can't easily see it, so it's probably moot. If it's an exterior door, two ideas: remove the trim, apply the caulk, re-apply the trim cut a small bit of surgical hose and attach it to the end of the caulk and use that to apply it.


7

One more thing is to keep water in the tub when you caulk until the caulk dries. It's a pain to work this way, but flex in the floor under the tub when there's weight in it can help open up a gap in the caulk over time if it was caulked with no weight in the tub. Given that your caulk is doing a critical job it shouldn't have to do means you don't want to ...


6

Ok Aaron, you will need to remove as much of the old caulk using a sharp putty knife. If you are careful you will not scratch the block or tile, however it can be tricky. Alternately, a rigid plastic scraper or caulk removal tool (cheap at HI stores) can be used to assure no scratching or gouging. The next step is to run a line of 3M delicate surface ...


6

Ideally it would be one continuous bead of caulking, however for 3/8" of a gap at the very top, you will probably be OK just adding a bit more caulking to fill it in. However, if you don't want to have to touch it again for a while--and considering the low cost and relative ease of applying it--I think I would be inclined to remove the existing bead and ...


6

The tube of caulk should include drying and curing times. It will vary based on the product so you definitely want to go by the manufactures recommendation and not some general guideline you find on the web somewhere. You are not the only person who does not want to have to wait a day or two before using their sink and bathtub and the caulk manufacturers ...


5

This is the same question you asked a couple of days ago. BTW, NEVER use silicone caulk on chimney masonry cracks, especially if the crack passes through. There are special masonry high temp caulks for this purpose. In your case where water is passing completely through the brick joints, you really need to have it repointed. Any competent contractor would ...


5

I just bought a permanent silicone product by GE which is guaranteed to dry in 1 hour and is mold resistant. GE 9.8 oz. White KB Supreme Silicone II Caulk


5

I would personally use Loctite PL Polyurethane Concrete Crack & Masonry Sealant, which will adhere well but still provide a degree of flexibility as your pipe moves within the brick. It's grey, but you can also mix in a little concrete dust or dirt to give it that "I'm not shiny caulk, honest!" look. The PL product should be available at your local ...


5

The key criteria for me is the size of the holes. If you used brads, then I have no problem with using caulk, especially on baseboards. The only possible downside is if you leave a fingerprint in it. You have to have eagle eyes to pick out a small hole like that. With crown molding though, I'd plan on a lightweight spackle. Mostly because of the cost ...


4

I read on several DIY websites that recommended taping blue painter's tape the width of the bead you want to lay down. I tried it last night on my shower, and it worked fairly well. Here's what I did: Clean and dry area to be caulked Put tape on both sides of joint Caulk (my initial pass looked pretty messy) Use your finger or a caulk smoothing tool to get ...


4

I use screw on electric caps. I always seem to have a few around, and you don't need a screwdriver or drill to get it on the tube. It works well, but like most of these solutions it is only a short term solution, once you open a tube of caulk it has a shelf life and if you don't use it you lose it.


4

Typically no caulking is used when setting a range top into a counter, however in your case where you are getting water from the sink under the lip, a small amount of silicone would not be a problem. The very outside mounting flange of you cook top should not get very hot. If you can touch it when the range is in use, then a standard silicone would be fine. ...


4

I don't think your friend's suggestion is bad, but I'd still want to be sure the caulk extended all the way to the exposed surface of the siding. Better not to let water get into the crack at all than to let it get in and stuck between siding and trim but blocked from penetrating further by caulk. Why? Because in winter, water that's in the crack will ...


4

This looks like this is one of those re-lined tubs. Get that caulked in as soon as possible. I don't mean to be an alarmist, but I am surprised that the sidewalls are set behind the tub's top edge, not over the tubs edge. The way this is now, relies only on the integrity of the caulk to keep the water out from the actual tub under the liner, where it would ...


4

Jack and Ecnerwal are both right in that the wall should overlap the tub. Your caulk probably failed prematurely because of the excessive runoff on it (and it is a bad caulk job). What would I do? Strip out all caulk. Then make sure that I fill the gap between wall and tub with Silicone. I would level the Silicone off at tub lip. Then I would recaulk ...


3

Because the lengths of brick mold are usually fairly short, less than 7 feet usually, expansion or contraction of a wood product is negligible. We often install exterior trim in cold temps here in Maine and really never see a problem. A couple of tips that will help insure tight joints year round are to put some waterproof wood glue, like titebond III on all ...


3

I agree with Doresoom, you need to use an acrylic mixed with silicone caulk. It is normally labeled as door, window and trim exterior caulk. This type of caulk is water clean-up, easy to smooth out and paintable when dry. Bathroom tub and tile silicone caulk is not paintable, and you;re right, much harder to work with.



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