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40

I've found that if you push the tip of the caulk gun forward along the line rather than drag it behind you can often make a very neat bead of caulk that needs little or no smoothing afterwards.


21

You will have to remove it and reapply. The trick is soap. Have a bowl of water and a bar of soap. Dip your finger in the water then rub it on the soap before using it to smoothe the silicone.


18

First of all, buy a good drip free caulking gun. Make sure you cut the tip of the caulk on an angle. If you want a perfectly straight line on each side, put painters tape on each side of the area you want to caulk. Then just pull it up before the caulk dries. If you do not want to use your finger to smooth it, the little squeegie like tools that you can ...


17

I think you're confusing the terms "caulk" and "silicone" for the colors "white" and "clear". A lot of caulks are made from silicone rubber, and they can be white or clear (or other colors). To answer your question, I would use a clear caulk around the base of the toilet as it will look better next to the wood. I've always used caulk because it prevents ...


15

Definitely use a damp finger, and have a paper towel ready to wipe off your finger if you used too much caulk. Also, with silicone and difficult to clean surfaces, you want to tape both sides of your caulk line first. Remove the tape immediately after using your finger. This isn't needed on trim/painted walls since the caulk will disappear under the paint. ...


13

I just caulked my shower last night. I used GE Silicone II caulk from Home Depot. I read up on this a little before picking out what kind I needed. From what I can tell, silicone caulk is good for bathrooms because: It's permanently waterproof It doesn't crack or shrink Another factor which may play into your choice of caulk could be whether or not it's ...


11

I'm just a motivated DIY guy, but when I learned tiling I was told to use silicone caulking wherever tile changes directions. So, inside corners, meeting the floor, etc.


11

There's nothing you can do now other than remove it and re-apply. The pro's often just use their finger to smooth it out. For those of us who don't have the magical touch, they make tools that allow you to put a nice finish on. There are a variety of different tools - this is just the first one that came up in a search.


11

In addition to DA01's suggestion, there are also smaller tubes of caulk that may be thin/small enough to angle into the casing corner. More costly, but you only need a little (if it fits).


10

It sounds to me like the area you are caulking is not clean. Especially for tile, you need to make sure to really clean the area you will be caulking, as dust and soap scum will make it tough for the caulk to stick. Also, make sure you are using the correct kind of caulk for the job.


10

You don't have a caulking problem, you have a structural one. The walls and floor shouldn't be moving so much that caulk cracks. And caulk isn't an adhesive for holding up the soap dish or towel bar. Finally, a rocking toilet indicates the floor either wasn't properly leveled or that it's not structurally sound. If these are the issues you are noticing, then ...


9

Plastic wrap (Saran wrap) and an elastic band.


9

Expanding foam. It seems like every time I grab a can of it, I somehow convince myself that I will be very careful and not touch any of it until after it has dried. I always end up with it on my hands/clothes. I spend the next 15 minutes with a bottle of acetone promising myself that I will wear disposable gloves next time.


9

As requested, here is my comment as an answer: I thought "caulk" was called "gap filler" internationally (a white substance like wet plaster). But your description sounds like silicone (and silicone-based sealants). If so, the magic trick for mess free edges isn't painter's tape, it's apply the silicone, then spraying the area with all-purpose cleaner ...


9

To prevent the messiness when smoothing it out with your finger, have a moist sponge handy. Smooth out a couple feet of calk, then wipe your finger on the sponge to get the excess caulk off and keep your finger moist.


9

I always leave a blob of caulk on the tip that's large enough for me to grab onto. It dries and seals the rest of the tube. When I'm ready to use the tube again, I just pull it off.


7

It sounds to me that you cut your tip to far down. Try cutting it closer to the top so the hole is smaller. A good caulk gun will help too and they aren't too expensive (about $12 at lowes or home depot).


7

The rubbery sealant is bathroom (or general-purpose) silicone caulk. As to why they don't use it between every tile, the answer is that it shouldn't be necessary; except for the one row of tile overhanging the "backsplash" of a "built-in" tub (helps keep minor splashes and overflow from seeping into the wall behind the tub), all tiles should be fixed to the ...


7

If you do it your self (not endorsing, and see comment by The Evil Greebo) you could put a more secure plug in by using hydraulic cement. To ensure that it does not come out, holes or cracks are usually back cut (the hole is made wider below the opening so that its diameter is greater than the diameter of the opening). This can be done with a small masonry ...


7

If it's an interior door, I'd suggest not bothering. If you can't easily get the tube in there, my guess is you can't easily see it, so it's probably moot. If it's an exterior door, two ideas: remove the trim, apply the caulk, re-apply the trim cut a small bit of surgical hose and attach it to the end of the caulk and use that to apply it.


7

One more thing is to keep water in the tub when you caulk until the caulk dries. It's a pain to work this way, but flex in the floor under the tub when there's weight in it can help open up a gap in the caulk over time if it was caulked with no weight in the tub. Given that your caulk is doing a critical job it shouldn't have to do means you don't want to ...


6

I've always used a drywall screw. It seems to last a few months depending on the type of caulk.


6

No you never silicone a toilet to the floor. If you do and have a leak, you won't be able too tell until it's too late. Then if you do have a leak and can't tell, there goes your floor.


6

Ok Aaron, you will need to remove as much of the old caulk using a sharp putty knife. If you are careful you will not scratch the block or tile, however it can be tricky. Alternately, a rigid plastic scraper or caulk removal tool (cheap at HI stores) can be used to assure no scratching or gouging. The next step is to run a line of 3M delicate surface ...


6

Yep, use a paintable latex bathroom caulk. We always use PolySeamSeal (now owned by LockTite, available at Lowe's).


6

Ideally it would be one continuous bead of caulking, however for 3/8" of a gap at the very top, you will probably be OK just adding a bit more caulking to fill it in. However, if you don't want to have to touch it again for a while--and considering the low cost and relative ease of applying it--I think I would be inclined to remove the existing bead and ...


6

I have never heard of this recommendation. If you are caulking an area that will regularly be exposed to water (sink, shower, etc.) I use a silicone caulk. Silicone caulk is 100% waterproof so there is no need to add any extra sort of sealer.


6

The tube of caulk should include drying and curing times. It will vary based on the product so you definitely want to go by the manufactures recommendation and not some general guideline you find on the web somewhere. You are not the only person who does not want to have to wait a day or two before using their sink and bathtub and the caulk manufacturers ...



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