Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


7

One more thing is to keep water in the tub when you caulk until the caulk dries. It's a pain to work this way, but flex in the floor under the tub when there's weight in it can help open up a gap in the caulk over time if it was caulked with no weight in the tub. Given that your caulk is doing a critical job it shouldn't have to do means you don't want to ...


4

Jack and Ecnerwal are both right in that the wall should overlap the tub. Your caulk probably failed prematurely because of the excessive runoff on it (and it is a bad caulk job). What would I do? Strip out all caulk. Then make sure that I fill the gap between wall and tub with Silicone. I would level the Silicone off at tub lip. Then I would recaulk ...


4

This looks like this is one of those re-lined tubs. Get that caulked in as soon as possible. I don't mean to be an alarmist, but I am surprised that the sidewalls are set behind the tub's top edge, not over the tubs edge. The way this is now, relies only on the integrity of the caulk to keep the water out from the actual tub under the liner, where it would ...


4

It looks like this is a tub that is not meant for installation up against a wall. Though it's hard to tell from the photo. Looks like a drop-in tub. Tubs that are meant for installation along a wall have a flange (not a lip) that the backer board goes over. This is what actually keeps the water in the tub. If this is purely a drop-in, you'll want to ...


3

Removing caulking can be time consuming, especially in the bathroom. From my experience there is no magic solution. I recommend these tools: flat head screw driver small paint scrapper (plastic as to not scratch any finishes) hair dryer Using the hair dryer, heat up the caulking, then use paint scrapper to loosen the caulking by pushing on top and ...


3

Not clear exactly what the wall covering is, but very clear it's installed wrong (the wall material should be lapped OVER the edge of the tub, not behind it, so the whole job of directing water is not dependent on the caulk.) That said, if recaulking best results are from removing the old caulking first and redoing the whole job.


3

PL 530 is not on Loctite's website Are you sure that the number is correct? Given their products with similar numbers, your tube of 530 is likely an adhesive, not a sealant. I would not use it except as a last resort in an emergency. I'd use a tube of sealant instead.


3

It could be construction adhesive, which would be hard to completely remove. Use a sharp utility knife to open up the crack. Don't worry about removing material that is still providing a seal, just remove the rough stuff in the opening so the new caulk will be able to bond to solid material. Fill the enlarged opening with caulk and you're done, unless you ...


3

By all means, use denatured or isopropyl alcohol to remove all mineral spirits. Go over the entire area a few times with the alcohol on a clean micro fiber cloth, turning the cloth each time to be sure no spirits are being reintroduced to the surface. The surface should be squeaky clean.


3

Experiment. Along one stretch of joint, apply a new layer of your preferred caulk directly over the existing caulk. If you like the result and the new layer holds up, complete the other walls. You are most likely to succeed with this approach if you first give the area a really good scrubbing to remove any soap scum. If the new caulk does not stick, it ...


2

While I'm tempted to say the difference is just marketing hype, you can use either one, there is a very slight difference in formulation. The window and door stuff has slightly less petroleum distillates in the formula, according to MSDS information at nih.gov. Petroleum distillates will evaporate during curing, so I'm unsure why there's a difference. The ...


2

Acrylic caulks and paints, etc. are water-based. If you can clean them up easily with water than that's a pretty good sign that they are water-soluble. Your caulk should be water-proof if fully cured. If you applied the caulking very thick or if the temperature is cool, it could take longer than the specified time to cure. Also, I don't think these are ...


2

As Michael Karas said 5/8 is a large gap to be dealing with, and no matter what you do now it is going to look "hack-ish" unless you re-do something. However as far as backer-rod is concerned you can use back-rod in a shower. As for what type, I'd go with closed-cell for less possibility of water absorption. For backer rod size you generally want 1/8" ...


2

A 5/8 inch gap is an awfully wide one to try to bridge with silicone caulk. Even with some type of filler I think you are unlikely to get a result that you would be happy with. At least I know I would not be happy. Silicone caulk needs to be applied all at once to get a nice installation. First off it will not be reasonably possible to squirt out a 5/8 ...


2

It depends. If he used a tiny bead the whole way around then you could. Not best practice but you could. Your caulk needs to attach to both the tub and tile. If you can accomplish that while caulking over and it looks good then good for you. Worst case scenario is you are out $5 for the caulk... You were going to have to scrape out the caulk anyway.


2

In all the shower installs I overseen, the company I worked for maintained that caulk is to be used in any inside corners except where excessive/standing water is. For example, caulk corners where tub and walls meet, and vertical inside corners where the walls come together. DO NOT caulk where the floor and walls meet, I personally seen caulk creep out of ...


2

On the PL530 label, under "Performance Facts", 1st box is "Features". It says "Premium grade adhesive formulation specifically for use on mirrors, ..."


2

Just peel or scape it off. Depending on what type of product was used, it might come off cleanly or it might not. Worst case is you will need to patch any damaged parts of the wall, prime and repaint (which you will need to do anyways!).


2

I agree that you have the wrong tub as Edwin points out and a half inch is way too big of a gap to caulk. I run across these issues a lot on flips. Putting in a tub is a pretty expensive job and could kill the tile job - that looks pretty good except for your issue. I would suggest a trim piece. They make plastic trim pieces that will handle this and you ...


1

Hope these tips from my experience doing caulking around tubs and showers help: Take your time. Don't rush it or you'll be doing it again within a year or two. It might take two nights to get the old caulk all out. So what. You want a job that will last. Clean out all the old caulk. Use a 1" paint scraper, razor blade scraper, knife, maybe high grit ...


1

There isn't anything wrong with grouting between tub and tile given that you do it right. I fill up tub full of water (weight) and grout. I feel grout is just easier to deal with. My grout has lasted 6-7 years now in one bathroom without any sort of cracking or separation. If there was separation I would caulk it. It does get mildew and mold and I ...


1

The technical term for what happened to the concrete on your driveway is that it "spalled", and sealing it with caulking isn't going to do much toward repairing it at this point. What you'll want to do is clean out all of the loose debris (a shop-vac and wire brush work pretty well) and then pressure wash it. After it is completely dry, inject or force ...


1

If you saturate toilet paper with the remover and slap it on your vertical surface it will stick there and hold it against the caulking. Practice a couple times with water to get a feel for the appropriate amount of moisture. Scrape off as much as possible before you start in with the remover though. Just to clarify, you should be using a plastic blade in ...


1

I started using GE paintable silicone about 10 years ago and have had no problems. Prior to that I used various types of caulk with unsatisfactory results. It costs more, but its well worth it to me. I use it mostly outside on the gaps between the siding and corner 2x4's and the gaps between the masonite siding.


1

We have several good/better lines of caulking available depending on your given project. I worked at Lowes in the paint department for over 4 years total. Never had anyone bring back anything other than DAP...strange. We even had a rack specifically for returned products and mis-tint paints, filled with DAP. Anyway, there are a few good brands that I've ...


1

I have come to steal a technique I learned from Mike Holmes, because though I have done plenty of caulking I have to admit that I'm just not very good at it freehand.... I tape the edges of my caulk line. Then I use a caulking tool for a good uniform shape... The "U" shape is what you're after (more like a hyperbola, though). Afterwards I pull the tape and ...


1

There are two primary uses for caulk: aesthetic gap filler functional moisture/air barrier For the latter, you'd see that wherever you need to waterproof joints (shower panels, exterior windows, etc.) For the former, it can really be used in any situation where you have two pieces of material meet. Typically this is done when two different materials ...


1

An exterior rated product will be good in the kitchen. The version you linked is a "3 hr rain ready" version, so you want to do any tooling ASAP. I like to put 2 tape lines of (blue or other painters edging tape) above and below the joint. Gun the entire line and then "thumb squeegee" the joint. Pull the tape off and immediately touch up with a rag ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible