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26

I just recently finished my basement project. I spent a lot of time scouring the web and grilling friends and co-workers about their basements to gather information to try to make an informed decision on this very subject. Here are the options I considered: Carpet tiles directly over concrete PROS cheap CONS cold feet hard, unforgiving floors ...


24

Fixing a squeaky floor beneath a carpet is a fairly complicated process that's probably best illustrated with video. This Old House provides a wonderful tutorial. The procedure demonstrated at that link does not require you to pull up any carpet and uses scored screws to hide your work. This seems to be the most hassle-free way to do what one might expect ...


14

It's totally normal. Carpet comes on rolls in widths from 11'6" to 13'. They need to cut off a chunk of that roll to fit the room. It's the reason why if you're carpeting a 10x10' room, you can't buy 100sqft of carpet: they'll charge you for more like 120sqft (12' roll, 10' long). It also depends on the layout of the room, and where they put seams (if ...


13

I just finished our garage this past summer and here are a few things I did. I insulated the garage door by cutting pieces of rigid insulation foam to fit into each piece of the garage door. You can glue them on and then seal the edges with expanding foam or caulk. On the side of garage door I installed weather strips and also on the top/bottom of the ...


13

They make rug pads just for this: You can find them at any big-box home improvement store.


13

Carpet is generally sold in 12' wide rolls. Good carpet installers use a combination of seam tape and a good stiff comb to make seams vanish. What they do is lay down the "tape" which is actually a 4" wide strip of cloth mesh coated in wax. They then butt the seams of the carpet up together nice and tight, and run a hot iron under the carpet between ...


11

Use a carpet sweeper. Bissell sells several models of mechanical manual sweepers -- an invention that's been around in some form since the 1880s. They work, but only to an extent. For deep cleaning you'll have to use a vacuum or roll up your carpet and take it in to the pros.


11

You should cut away carpet. The cabinets will last longer than the carpet and will just be a mess when it's time to install new carpet. I'd want the cabinets secured directly to the floor, not through carpet/pad. When you pull up the carpet and baseboard, you'll see the tack strip. If you are careful, you can re-use it, but it is cheap to replace. ...


10

Lay a very damp, but not dripping, heavy towel over the mark, then iron it with a regular clothes iron on high heat. Go over it for a few minutes until it's good and steamy. Then remove the towel and brush the carpet with a stiff brush, against the direction in which the fibers are lying down. Try to get them raised as much as possible and then let it ...


10

If there's a door, under the door, directly. Otherwise, either dead center or even with one edge or the other. If there's no door, I'd say bring the carpet up to the edge of the tile, rather than cutting the tile to meet in the middle. That said - it's a purely aesthetic choice.


9

If the pros couldn't do much, It sounds like the stain is there for good. Some suggestions: small throw rug/welcome mat. Just cover it up! bring in a pro to swap that bit of carpet with maybe something in a closet, or just a far corner. A good carpet pro should be able to seam it all back together. dye the entire carpet a shade or two darker. I know such ...


8

You may consider just replacing your garage door with an insulated one. It's definitely more expensive than insulating it yourself, but it will do a better job insulating, and especially if your door is older it will update the look of your house.


8

If your basement is really dry as you suggest, carpeting directly on top is fine. To test: Take a 1x1m sheet of plastic (garbage bag would do) and tape it to the floor making sure it's sealed all the way around. Leave it there for 24h at least and see if moisture appears at the bottom. If it's bone dry, you should be OK. We renovated our basement and based ...


8

In the "olden days" before there were vacuum cleaners you either swept (which still works to an extent -- tough bristles, short quick strokes are key) or took the carpet up and beat the dust and dirt out with a carpet beater (which also works, as long as your carpet isn't fitted). Alternatively, there are machines that spray water and shampoo into the ...


8

It makes it easier for the carpet installer because they don't have the baseboards in the way when they're nailing in the tack strips next to the wall. On the other hand, it makes things a little more difficult to install the baseboard later because the carpet and tack strips are in the way when you're trying to nail the baseboard to the sole plate in the ...


7

I'd go ahead and pull it up and see what you've got. It sounds like it's in pretty poor shape so you're going to have to get rid of it either way. Depending on how the carpet was installed you'll probably find tack strips that look something like like this: You might also find staples -- I don't know if this is common but our installer used a staple gun ...


7

You'll want to install carpet to tile transition strips (sometimes known as edge trim). Here is a listing from home depot. Basically it's a decorative metal strip that goes over the carpet/tile gap and provides a nice, attractive transition between the two. Here are some instructions from eHow on how to install the transition.


7

They make garage door insulation kits. I have never tried one, but I have seen them in the stores. Owens Corning Insulation Kit:


7

You can pull carpet up off the tacking strip to do some work. It depends on how much of the carpet you're going to pull up. Carpet is stretched over tack strips using a kick stretcher or a power stretcher so if you pull the WHOLE carpet it you risk losing that stretch. I did some work under our carpet and wound up pulling up too much and had to hire a ...


7

You might try crocheting yarn from elsewhere on the carpet onto the backing. Basically you are pushing loops of yarn through that backing and then pulling them up so they're even with the rest of the yarn. It'll be finicky to get looking right, but should be a nice durable solution if done well. Alternately, as others have said, cut a scrap and use it to ...


7

They're billing you for their actual materials cost this way. It's not a made-up number. In the end, though, the final price is what matters, not how they come up with it. Get more than one estimate. Prices of work on your house vary widely, as does quality of work, and the two are not always linked.


7

Baking soda needs to be in contact with the odors to work. If the baking soda is wet, it will not really work at all because the water will be blocking the odors from getting near the surface of the baking soda. I also suspect it would be a real mess to clean up. In the past I've tried baking soda on carpets (dry!) and found it to be a waste of time. A ...


7

From a comfort and water protection perspective, I think you'll find it beneficial to install a sub floor. I'd recommend one which allows for ventilation beneath it such as these 2x2 panels you can buy at Home Depot/Lowes Dricore This will give you a nice, warm "softer" surface to put your carpet pad on, and help protect from any condensation issues with ...


7

If your soon-to-be-landlord is already making unreasonable demands, I would reconsider your choice to rent with them. Minor carpet staining from traffic is considered to be "wear and tear" in most states, as well as scuffing of the walls and other things that result from simply living in a space. Unless you're a group of college kids (to which, I could ...


7

No, I would not recommend nailing through carpet. Whether or not you prefer to, cutting the carpet and pad and removing them (under the wall) is the only right way to do this job. Baseboards on top of carpet will look like baseboards on top of carpet. If that's not how the rest of the baseboards are done, they will indeed look "off;" especially in the ...


6

There is a great solution in a related question I asked. They make specialty screws that you can install though the carpet to attach the floor board, and then break off the screw heads above the carpet. They typically are made to stop squeaks, but they will work great for you too! The kit comes with the screws, a jug to hold and break off the screws, and ...


6

They make a product called Rug-Gripper that is specifically designed to hold a throw rug down.


6

My two cents worth..... We always install the base trim and door trim first. If you have split jam doors with the casings already attached, you must install them first or you will have a real problem fitting the jams to the floor between rooms. As mentioned, sometimes the carpet installers can scratch the finish on the baseboards, however it is usually ...


6

You absolutely should (must) bind the edges. Many consumer rugs are cut to length from a roll stock and bound for sale. Binding the edge is how it transforms from a textile on a roll into a rug. You could do it yourself if you had the requisite equipment and sewing skills but I can't imagine it would be tremendously expensive to have done. You can find ...


6

Technically, yes you can, but in reality the results might not be great: Carpet is measured and cut to fit a house's floorplan: individual pieces are cut from a carpet roll to fit around the tricky bits in your house (door openings, inside closets, etc.) and then taped and ironed together on site. Unless you have the exact same floorplan, you're going to ...



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