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18

Don't attach the fence to the house. Aside from putting holes in your siding (not a good thing), your fence and your house will most likely move differentially. The attachment could result in a tear of the siding, which would be a bad thing. Place the fence post close to the house, then run the fencing top and bottom supports up to within an inch or so of ...


12

OK here we go. First of all, the most common reasons for squeaky hardwood floors are age and installation over uneven subfloors, where any movement of wood on wood makes the sounds. Age becomes a factor when the subfloor ages, shrinks a bit making the nails holding the hardwood a bit loose. Adding either a layer of felt or rosin paper isolates the wood ...


11

You shouldn't have to do anything too special, but here are a few tips from my experience: Use a treated board for the bottom of the wall where it touches the concrete. This will help to prevent rotting from any moisture that may seep up from the concreate. Build the whole wall on the ground just a bit shorter than the lowest joist/beam so you can easily ...


10

building a make-shift semi permanent ladder is not a great idea for a couple of reasons. First: It is very possible that your homeowner's insurance will insist it be removed or cancel your coverage. I know this for fact as my insurance company (Good Neighbor) did an informal walk around my house and discovered a homemade ladder going from the sunroom roof ...


8

I would use a pocket screw joint. It is generally considered to be a stronger joint, and you can remove the clamps immediately after driving the screws (as opposed to waiting until the glue sets). Along with the strength and speed, it also makes the construction process easier. You don't have to drill 2 separate holes, and then attempt to get the ...


7

Simple solution. Materials: Plywood sheet. Quilt batting, Upholstery foam, or similar. Fabric. Fabric glue. [Optional] Buttons and heavy thread. Procedure: Cut a sheet of plywood to the proper size. You'll want it to start below where it will bolt to the bed frame (about an inch or so), and extend to your desired height above the bed. and you'll want ...


7

I'd use the 24 tooth blade, but be sure it is a carbide type and sharp. Since all your cuts are end cuts and will be covered with baseboard trim, so getting an ultra smooth cut is not that important. Obviously, you don't want to see any large chips on the cut edge, so do your cuts slowly and smoothly. Save your 48 blade for visible finish cuts on softer ...


7

I think the typical "you get what you pay for" rule of thumb applies for the most part. That being said, sometimes things are cheap because they are not designed to last under heavy load like drills that use plastic gears instead of metal. In these cases, assuming you only lightly use the tool, they might last for decades. Some other tools are cheap because ...


6

Your plan sounds fine. If it were me, I would likely do the temporary support from beneath (a temporary stud extending from the floor below, intersecting the ceiling at the intersection of B and P). Either way, I think you will be fine. A reciprocating saw is the right tool for this job. It will allow you to cut the nails holding the existing cross ...


6

Below quoted advice is pinched from here, How to paint a wood house? If you encounter any damp, rotten, etc wood during the preparation stage, I highly recommend removing it. When doing so, cut 150mm (6inch) past the last sign of damage ie Get back to good, solid wood. Preferably re-patch with the same wood species. In your particular situation ...


6

There are a number of online calculators related to the problem in the answers & comments to an earlier question about building shelves: What are cheap ways to build strong shelves with a large span? References included: The Sagulator (sag calculator for different types of wood & related materials) Elastic Beam Deflection Calculator (can handle ...


6

You could simply make the shelves at the corner "L" shaped, like this. Another approach would be to make a corner unit, at an angle to the two wall units. Like this. A smaller corner unit, is also an option. Though all of these options are dependent on your personal preference.


5

A dimensional 2x4 is 1.5 inches x 3.5 inches. The reason being, 2x4 describes the rough dimensions before the boards are milled down to their "dimensional" (flat/even) size. So you start with a rough 2"x4" board that might be somewhat warped, crooked, rough, etc.. then it is passed through the mill, where it is planed/cut down to the final ...


5

Dowels work but biscuits are so much easier. They're a weaker joint, but are much faster to construct. A Rockler Blog post on the subject states: What we hear most – and agree with - is that biscuits joints serve best as a quick and easy way to keep glue-up parts in alignment, and that they add appreciable pull-apart to strength joints that would be ...


5

There are several issues to consider - whether the 2x4 itself is strong enough to bear the load you're putting on it in the direction that you're loading it (so the grade/type of wood is important, not all 2x4's are created equal), whether the fastener/hook you use will overstress the wood in the 2x4 at the point where it attaches, and whether the load on ...


5

This makes perfect sense. You would use a reciprocating saw to cut the nails holding the header at position Q in place. Handy tool to have but if it's not in the budget or you don't foresee needing it for anything else, it can be rented. You might be able to re-use the header after you've cut it out, but I'd have a suitable piece of lumber ready to make a ...


5

Generally wood flooring these days is laid on a 3/4" plywood subfloor, whereas in the 50's and 60's a subfloor was 3" by 3/4" planking. Rosin paper would block light from the basement shining through the floorboards. I personally no longer use rosin paper on wood floor installs simply because I like to use adhesives on miter cuts used for perimeter picture ...


5

I've never tried it with MDF, but because you specifically mention the need to disassemble/reassemble it, you might want to look into using something like a T-nut aka tee nut or other types of threaded inserts, so you can attach that to the board, and not have to worry about the screws / bolts slowly wearing away the MDF.


5

I learned a lot from watching "This Old House", back in the day when the home owners did a lot more of the work (now get off of my lawn). I also learned a lot by watching the "New Yankee Workshop". However I didn't watch these to learn anything specific, I just watched them because I enjoyed them. I'm not certain how they might suit your needs.


5

Definitely the Brad nails. The finish nails will leave larger holes (16 gauge vs 18 gauge usually) and will be more likely to split the wood. Based on the size of your shoe, i dont think you could use pin nails (18-23 gauge). The Big Box home improvement store always sell kits with finish, brad, and pin nailers for pretty cheap. Some have 2 guns, some 3, ...


5

The wall seems to have 'full dimension' studs and the markings of old lath and plaster. I don't see plywood sheathing on the exterior walls. All in all I'm guessing that your house was built prior to WWII and is either 'post and beam' or 'balloon frame' construction, both of which are radically different in terms of structure and loads from modern ...


5

The main reason the recess is in the back of all moldings is to "thin" the wood, reducing the amount of continuous rings in the wood that helps control cupping. There is a fringe benefit of that relief in the back of trim, it helps get past some irregularities in the wall. I have had more problems with that relief cut than benefits when it come to base. The ...


5

Weight isn't going to be your issue here. 2 inch furring strips may be pretty hard to hit with the drywall screws. The screws need to be in good solid wood and not going through an edge etc. If You are careful, caulk some good lines, the 1X2's might work for ya. The other consideration is if the spacing is good and you have enough surface to butt pieces of ...


4

It sounds like you are trying to build something in one place, pack it up and re-build it in another. If this is the case then screws are the way to go for dry fit, and then glue and screws for the final instal. I generally use Course thread dry-wall screws - because I feel they bite and pull MDF the best. The only thing here is that there is a limited ...


4

Build up the piece in layers. It's a lot easier to bend a thin sheet of wood, then bending say a 3/4" piece. The basic idea here is to create an arched piece of plywood. Start with a thin sheet of wood 1/8" to 1/4" depending on the type of wood, and the finished pieces thickness. soak the sheet in water until it is pliable. Using clamps or a jig, bend the ...


4

It's just an ornamental wall it sounds like, so do it as cheap as you can :) Since you've got a beam in the ceiling, I'd just build a minimal frame out of 2x4s, nail it into the ceiling beams where you can, stick fiberglass insulation in the spaces between studs and then drywall over that.


4

I think this is one of those cases where you are going to have to do an experiment. Get a scrap piece of plywood and try to drill some dowel holes in the edge and see if the ply splits. I'd try different dowel sizes to strike the balance between small enough so it doesn't split the ply, but large enough to hold the piece together. Another thing you could ...


4

Your crown molding is going to have to be special cut. You could do it yourself, however there is a certain pattern that crown mold is cut in to give it its shape (As I am sure you know). One thing to think about in trying to cut it yourself, is that you are going to need a table saw to make your top and bottom cuts. The top and bottom edges are angles ...



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