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3

Blown fiberglass is fairly easy to move aside and replace once the work is done. Do your best to fluff and level it, and try to avoid disrupting areas of high slope, as they'll be more difficult to restore. Where you can, simply staple the cable to the roof truss members rather than dropping it in the insulation. The less you compress it the better. Be sure ...


1

I sure am glad I don't have your problem. :-) Besides the choices of using long heavy wire, a second meter, transformers, etc. Another option might be to install a generator. A capacity of 100 amps at 240 volts is 24,000 watts (24 kw). Costco carries those online. Such generators run about $5,000 with all the options for failover, but if there is no ...


9

This application has "transformers" written all over it. A big factor in AC vs DC power (Tesla vs Edison) being the ability to haul it long distances. And this right here is where that comes into play. In every single scenario, your barn needs its own earth grounding system. Plan 1: Conventional sub-panel (as discussed elsewhere) Wire cost: $4000. (...


3

Since you didn't include a load calculation for the barn, I used the full 100 amperes for the following calculations. A 100 ampere feeder would likely have to use 3 AWG copper conductors (1 AWG aluminum), so that's where you'd start at. You'll want to limit the voltage drop as much as possible, which would mean installing larger conductors. A rule of thumb,...


2

This is one of those perennial questions where the answer is both simple and complex. If you actually expect to USE 100 amps at the barn, you plug 100 amps and 550 feet into a voltage drop calculator with various wire sizes and materials, shooting for 3% or less voltage drop. But if you plan rather for the actual loads you will be running, the wire size ...



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