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34

First off, your cabling doubles as your telephone wiring, so 2 per room is reasonable. Put a jack anywhere you think you may need a phone, computer, or media device (TV/Boxee/game console/etc). If you know you are going to likely need a couple at some particular spot (eg, a home office, or your main TV watching area) then you can do that as well. Run all ...


23

You have good answers so far, but I have several items that I don't think have been covered yet. I will start by recapping. Number of Cables per room Cat5e (and cat6) can be used for telephone, both the old school phone and VoIP phones. This makes it easier to not have to worry about running as many different types of cables. I would highly suggest going ...


16

Cat6 is capable of very high speeds (by today's standards; hi 2021!), but only within a bunch of additional constraints over lower-speed cable. Especially difficult is terminating the cable. When you untwist enough to terminate, it's easy to expose yourself to interference. Some people buy long, pre-terminated Cat6 and pull that, instead of pulling bulk ...


11

You want to keep low voltage and high voltage separate so that stray nails, screws, and staples installed by less attentive individuals in the future can't puncture the cables and turn your low voltage wire into high voltage. There is always a chance some idiot is going to stick something electrically conductive where he ought not, and he probably shouldn't ...


10

As others have mentioned, there may or may not be stuff in the wall obstructing your plan. But most likely not (insulation it the most likely, but should not stop you). Find an area between the studs and cut a hole in the wall where your box will go as other have described. Then drill a 3/4" - 1" hole in top plate within the same stud cavity. That's the ...


10

Couple problems I see. First is the textured ceiling. You'll never be able to open that up and patch it without being obvious, the texture is something that just isn't done these days. Second, the exterior wall should have insulation in it, so you'll end up fishing the line through insulation and the vapor barrier. Instead, I'd suggest running the line ...


10

Before you spend too much time and money on this, buy a new wireless router. They've come a long way. When finishing my basement I added two communication drops to each room and...never used them. Wireless was fine. What's more important than the cable is that you have an easily accessible way to run what you need at a later date. Smurf tube is a common ...


9

Your friend is looking for Fish Tape, like this or like this.


8

I think I'd look for the outside spliter and run the cable around the outside of the house under the edge of the siding and try to enter as close as possible through the wall behind the TV. If the spliter is indoors, run a line back outdoors and around. BMitch is correct, you will never be able to fish that distance without opening the ceiling, and cutting ...


8

I have the same problem with the two piece, so I use the compression type. They cost more money, but they are simply worth it. I've never had one pull off. This is the style most cable and satellite companies use. Never use electrical diagonal cutters or dykes to cut cable. They flatten out the end. Use cutters like this. Always use a good ...


8

What about running it along the underside of that shelf that runs around the perimeter of the room? Just drill through the wall underneath the shelf and between some studs, and run the wire tucked under the shelf all the way back against the wall. You won't be able to see it unless you're sitting on the floor.


8

2 Cat5e drops to each bedroom. You can put them in the same faceplate; you can also put your coax cable for the tv / receiver in that panel also (including phone) - Leviton makes face plates that accept from 1 to 6 universal connections (this can be rj45, rj11, coax, etc...) You need a switch regardless to break out your modem (be it DSL, Fiber, cable ...


7

If your wall is closed up then you don't have to worry about it. It looks like class 2 wire is rated to go into walls. Only use wire that is rated to be in the walls for uses like what you have. The only things to worry about with class 2 or class 3 wiring is: Class 2/3 should never be used in the same electrical box (without a low voltage divider or in ...


7

Yes, its still valid. Power and data cable coatings are insulation - designed to protect from electric shock and to avoid short circuits. They do not interfere with magnetic fields. I do not know what kind of shielding you are talking about - I have never seen any modern power or data cables with shielding that blocks magnetic fields. Magnetic fields are ...


7

This has been discussed many times on this site and maybe even a few times on Server Fault. Step 1: The plan Come up with a plan - how many drops per room? Where will you terminate all the wires back to? Are there clear path's from floor to floor via the walls? ie: is there an empty part of the wall on the first floor but not on the 2nd floor? Do interior ...


6

To help you with the terms, what you're looking at from above is the top plate. Frequently there are two 2x4's for a top plate. Two boards are used for added structure at the joints and extra fire proofing. This gives you about 3" of wood to drill through. As ChrisF mentions, you should run a stud finder up and down the wall cavity near the halfway point ...


6

You normally want to use outdoor flooded cable (also called gel-filled) as it is designed to weather the elements. I have a few clients who have gone with outdoor flooded & shielded cable as they were worried about interference on the outdoor runs. Also look for UV-resistant cable if it's not going to be buried or otherwise enclosed. As for Cat 5e ...


6

You cannot passively split a cable run without loss. You can split a run with a lot less loss in one leg using a device called a tap (looks like a standard splitter, except when you consult the specs). This device is used where several rooms are going to be fed from a backbone. The next leg in the backbone is fed by the low loss leg and the high loss leg ...


6

One way to locate the wall base location in the crawl space is to go ahead and make the cutout for your component cable wall box and cover plates. Such wall plate may look similar to this: Then using a long flexy drill bit of this type: You can then drill down through the wall base into the crawl space. Leave the drill bit in the hole so you can see it ...


5

Cable service is generally provided to the house using RG-6 or RG-7 coaxial cable, and is distributed around the house using the same type cable. Some older installations used RG-58 or 59 (not as good, but may still work). This is the cable that should be leading to each of the cable outlets in your house. The service from the initial cable coming into the ...


5

This is one of the residential structured media cabinets that you can get at any of the big box stores, made by Leviton and several others (your pic is too low resolution for me to read the name on the phone block, there may also be a name on the cabinet door). You can buy additional blocks of all sorts of things to fit in these, such as network patches, ...


5

As stated in a comment, hiding behind crown molding is a possibility, as is going behind baseboard molding. If I really wanted to do this, I'd pull the baseboards, and run them on a tablesaw with a narrow dado blade to cut a pocket for Cat6 cable. Then you can run along walls, poke through them to adjacent rooms, etc. I'd look to place switches ...


5

Concrete walls typically have conduits where all wiring passes (edit: as pointed out by @alx9r, this might not always be the case. Sometimes wiring is cast directly into the concrete). This allows you to add additional wires to the same conduits, but doesn't help if you need to pass a wire between two places that don't have a conduit already in the wall. ...


4

One thing I've learned over the years is that cutting and repairing drywall is sometimes easier than the aggravation of trying to run wires through a wall. If you think there is blocking up the wall as ChrisF said or insulation, it may be easier to cut out a section of drywall that gives you the space you need to run the wire then repair the drywall. If ...


4

You already have an accepted answer on how to achieve your result, the only note I would make in addition is that if you want to use gigabit connections down the road ( most computers now are on the 10/100 mbps standard, which cat 5/5e is fine for ) you should run cat 6 cable. It generally costs a small amount more, but is easier than re-fishing a wire down ...


4

100 meters is quite a long way for copper Ethernet (Google search) and if I remember correctly, there might be some problems with potential difference (not to mention lightning). Did you consider fiber optics? I think the equipment is priced quite reasonably and you would get rid of all speed & potential problems at once.


4

Well, here I go potentially disagreeing with some more experienced folks. Assuming you have clearance over the ceiling all the way to the back wall, this is doable with fish tape and a hole in the wall with the tv on it. Get some small conduit (even thin pvc pipe will do), and put a 90 degree angle in the end. In the case of metal conduit you would bend it ...


4

Wire is cheap, opening up walls later is expensive. I would lean towards running as much cable as you think you might need, even if it isn't terminated, and just coiled behind the wall, or in a junction box with a blank plate on it. Another tip, not just for cabling, is to take pictures of the pipes, wires, etc, before the walls are closed. This will be ...


4

If you just want to extend your network you can use your existing electrical system. This is called power line ethernet You get various version- The simplest being point to point. and more complicated ones that allow for mulitplexing/switching across several units like the one in the image below. And you can get very advanced and slick ones called ...



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