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0

Hm. Different strokes for different folks... In my country, terminal blocks are mandatory. So, to me, THAT'S normal. However, a 'butt connector' or other crimped connection is fairly solid. I´d like to point out that a proper lineman's splice works fine for solid copper wire, as far as I'm concerned, insulated with a couple layers of heat shrink tubing. ...


13

Is a stranded wire connection, properly twisted and taped, objectively any worse/better than wire-nuts? I have not found any objective studies that compare a properly-made twisted splice of stranded cable with joins made using a US wire-nut, a UK terminal block or other systems such as the Wago 222 lever connector (and other makers equivalents). ...


0

I use "butt connectors" for every application. Tape eventually wears out like other have mentioned. Butt connectors are those that get crimped through a little metal tube (usually) making the connection very secure. I have never had a problem with them coming out. Good luck!


2

The main advantages to twist-on wire connectors are ease of use, and time required to make a splice. Making a reliable connection with twist-on wire connectors is easy, only requiring three simple steps. Strip the wires Put the connector on the wires Twist until secure. A twisted splice is a bit more difficult, requires a bit of practice to get right, ...


3

While i am a communications engineer [MSEE], i have wired a few houses, as well as done quite a bit of field engineering. What i would question with the twisted/taped connection, is whether the joint is "gas tight". Merely twisting the wires allows moisture and oxygen into the joint. Over time, particularly in a moist environment, this can lead to ...


29

Splice connectors such as US-style wirenuts and UK style terminal blocks are demonstrably better in nearly every way to the twist-and-tape method you describe. Wirenuts and terminal blocks are more resistant to mechanical failure due to heating/cooling cycles and the mechanical stress of installation. Wirenuts and terminal blocks are easier to inspect and ...


9

There are a few cons to using tape: I think the most imperitive factor is that a good tape-job is difficult or impossible to verify (an inspector couldn't tell if 3 wraps or 4 were used). Also working on the wires later is often a goey mess, because tape breaks down. And tape is slower to install than wire nuts (time is more expensive than material). ...


3

A 7 twist solid copper wire has fair strength but over time especially with just tape the connection can loosen with big loads as the wires jump around. Wire nuts are normally used in the US on 10, 12 & 14 AWG wire. Stranded wire will not hold up with out some kind of pressure connector a wire nut works great on stranded. With larger wire sizes Split ...


1

It looks like you have a common RF 4 way cable splitter, with cable coming into through the green wire and 4 TVs (the other cables). You should look at the splitter closely (is this RF or digital; one in and four out?), and determine if I traced the line correctly. If this looks like an RF 4 way splitter, and you want to add an antenna (no more "cable TV") ...



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