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14

To the best of my knowledge, the only fire retardation requirements that exist for a residence apply to slowing the spread of fire between connected units - say in a duplex or row home. In the case of your personal dwelling, there is almost no way to restrict the spread of fire within a residence without making it extremely inconvenient to navigate in your ...


10

In a single family residence, with the exception of a garage, I don't believe there are any codes concerning the spread of fire. There are requirements to have smoke detectors to notify you of a fire, and other requirements to avoid creating a fire, but not to stop it's spread. If there were, you'd need fire rated doors that seal to the floor between rooms, ...


10

It's by no means an all-in-one solution but I've personally found Velcro Cable Ties to be INVALUABLE. You can reuse them over and over; great for those "oh darn!" moments when you need to remove or replace a cable. -M


9

I'm a fan of the recessed media box that monoprice sells. I installed it pre-drywall which I'm sure is easier, but it does have the ability to be installed as a retrofit (you don't say in your question which way you're doing this). There's two major issues with having actual connectors in the wall behind the TV: you have two additional connections per ...


6

In general I think the pros prefer the wall plates. It gives it a cleaner look especially when nothing is attached (no components are installed yet). I know some audio/video-phile types actually prefer "big hole" method as it cuts down on the number of connections. Imagine 1 cable (2 connections, 1 at the cable box and 1 at the TV) compared to 2 cables ...


6

This has been discussed many times on this site and maybe even a few times on Server Fault. Step 1: The plan Come up with a plan - how many drops per room? Where will you terminate all the wires back to? Are there clear path's from floor to floor via the walls? ie: is there an empty part of the wall on the first floor but not on the 2nd floor? Do interior ...


5

As stated in a comment, hiding behind crown molding is a possibility, as is going behind baseboard molding. If I really wanted to do this, I'd pull the baseboards, and run them on a tablesaw with a narrow dado blade to cut a pocket for Cat6 cable. Then you can run along walls, poke through them to adjacent rooms, etc. I'd look to place switches ...


4

For home office I am a big fan of the Ikea Signum. It is a wire basket, with hooks for wires that attaches and hangs under a desk. What I have done is zip-tie a power strip to the underside of the basket, and route all of the wires up into the basket, then route as much wire as I need up to items on the desk (computer, monitor, printer, etc..). It works ...


4

Here are some boxes I found. Not only would it keep the connections out of the weather, but a box would dress it up a little and look more professional:


4

Just use the existing wires with one of these. They are awesome; a bit pricey but it saves you ripping this out and then pulling cables, sweating like mad; cables getting snagged, maybe you need two or three... forget it! Power Ethernet Sockets You can also get the smaller, cheaper and less stylish ones. THey do the same job. Powerline Ethernet ...


3

As BMitch and The Evil Greebo both point out, you may not be required to seal the penetrations. However, if for your own peace of mind you wanted to do it, here is what I'd do. Install a single gang electrical box on each side of the wall (not back to back. And don't use low voltage boxes for this application). Connect the boxes using flexible metallic (or ...


3

Yes it's definitely possible. If you have carpeting you often can just push the wire under the baseboard in the gap left for the flooring. Otherwise the most common option is to remove the baseboards, and then cut out a strip of drywall at the bottom of the wall. You hide your wires in this channel, and then replace the baseboards. Make sure that when ...


3

I use a velcro cable wrap (this one, actually) for anywhere visible (on my desk behind my monitors, and upstairs in my living room behind my TV). It's a braided sleeve which has velcro running the entire length, which wraps around a bundle of cables. It's relatively easy to add/remove cables to this, and it's also very easy to allow individual cables to come ...


2

You can get waterproof coax connectors, though there's a bit tough to find. They have a rubber gasket in them that seals the connection. Another option is to use standard compression coax connectors, but put heat shrink tubing around the outside to seal them. If you have to locate the splitter in a location where it is more directly exposed to the ...


1

If this is a cable TV wire, your best solution is to get it re-run properly by the cable TV company. Unfortunately, that sometimes can only be arranged by figuring out when it would be least inconvenient to you to have the cable out for a while and then running over it with the mower, etc - at least in my experience they are good at coming to fix stuff, bad ...


1

Structured media enclosures are a common solution. It's basically a cabinet that can be built into a wall, where all the devices can be stored. It usually has some form of cable management, and a way to affix devices.


1

If you suspect your cable connection is being diverted or stolen, contact your cable provider at once and report it. If you look at your cable bill, usually in the fine print or on the back there will be instructions on how to report theft of services. If not, visit their website and search for "report theft". You can call their main telephone number and ...


1

Yes, you can take the baseboard off, cut a groove in it on a table saw, and install low voltage cabling. This would be suitable for a single Ethernet or coax. Similarly you can groove the drywall behind, but it's messier. You'll want prime paint after grooving to keep everything from falling apart. Note that the baseboard area can be a source of air ...


1

If you can, pull up your moulding, and run your wires behind the moulding. Secure them loosely with tacks or tie wrap holders, and put the mouldings back using silicone and/or liquid nails, not nails or screws, because accidentally nicking a perfectly run wire with a nail is frustrating. You can also staple CAT5e to moulding, but that's a recipe for ...


1

Without seeing some detailed pictures it's hard to recommend a solution. But it should be possible with a lot of patience. I'm assuming there will be some space of some sort between the floors. You can buy things like flexible drill bits that are designed for drilling through framing up walls. And then there tools available for drawing wire through tight ...


1

Just did this recently when I installed my new antenna tower. I picked up an outdoors electrical junction box to contain my grounding setup. I couldn't get ahold of any of the old "outdoors" style coax connectors (seem to have gone out of style), so I used the normal coax connectors, crimped on, then filled with dielectric coax sealant gel. I also had ...


1

I've had a coax junction screwed to the outside of my house for years (probably close to a decade) -- the only protection we have is that the cables connecting to it were made w/ the 'outdoor' type ends. If you really wanted an enclosure, you could use an electrical box with a weatherproof cover, feed the cables up from below, make the connections, then ...


1

I keep my entertainment system on wire shelves, so most of my cables are tied to the posts / legs of the shelves. Of course, I also still have an old CRT television. For much of my networking gear (power distribution, DSL modem, network switches, wireless router, small server, etc.), I have it mounted to a sheet of plywood in the basement along with the ...



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