New answers tagged

5

Nonsense... there's no way the output from the AC will damage a modern cabinet. The carcass of the cabinet is undoubtedly plywood or MDF which is plenty dimensionally stable. If you're still worried, add louvers and point the exhaust away from the cabinets, but I wouldn't give it a second thought.


3

There is no magic; you are fighting thermodynamics. You may be able to cool individual containers somewhat by wrapping damp cloth around them so evaporation takes away some of the heat. You could arrange some sort of drip or pump to keep those moist, and a fan to improve the evaporation and heat removal... And you'd basically have reinvented the "swamp ...


4

Sorry I don't have enough points to comment yet so have to put this reply in the answer. I had a vent coming out under the cabinets in the kitchen of my house for 20 years with NO PROBLEM (i.e. at the floor level where the kick-plate is). This wasn't even ductwork under the cabinet, but rather the vent exhausted into the frame under the cabinets, which ...


0

i think the easiest way to do what you want is twofold. first, apply the coating with a spray gun, second, change to a lacquer clearcoat. this is pretty standard for all furniture and casework. lacquer goes on really thin and dries really fast. then sand it with 400 grit. reapply as necessary and repeat until you get the build thickness you desire. ...


1

Preventing runs is as easy as following one simple approach: Start heavy, finish light. What that means is that you immerse your brush to maybe inch of depth, scrape off one side on the can, and apply the remaining product load to the project in a new area adjacent to the previous work. The idea of "starting heavy" is that you apply enough product to ...


1

Base shoe is more common these days, partly for this reason. It's only about 1/2" deep, and generally fits alongside appliances without a problem. Still, I'd bet 3/4" quarter will fit along and under the fridge body from what I can see here. Worst case scenario you may need to lift your appliances slightly using a rear wheel shim and the front adjusters.


2

Always an interesting choice. Most new construction puts cabinets on the subfloor. One of the reasons for doing this is to avoid damaging the new floors during construction. Floors are one of the last items to complete so it is much easier to install cabinets first. The downside is that when a future remodeling is done, the footprint of the old cabinets ...


1

Euro style hinges adjust in all 3 directions that you'd want: up/down, in/out (relative to the cabinet wall), and front/back. If you start with a cabinet carcase that's square or nearly square, it's usually a matter of tweaking some of those 3 adjustments on the hinges. (If the cabinet is desperately racked, you might exceed the adjustment range of the ...


0

For anyone who may be struggling with this issue, there I a simple solution. My cabinets are partial inset, using plain 3/8's inset hinges that were close to my originals in order to cover black markings left on my stiles. I added toothpicks and glue to original holes.so that my screws fit well. But after installed had to close double doors together or they ...


5

Why are you using a router? Does your microwave overlap the edges? If so, I'd use a jigsaw, seems to me to be much easier set up.


1

I'm assuming you mean want to expand the rectangular front cut out, and not some other hole. I think most hand-held routers would do the job. There is no need for a plunge feature in this operation, but you will want to guide the router along a straight edge to do a good job. My first choice would be downward spiral ΒΌ" straight bit, to eject the wood chips ...


4

Straightly has entirely to do with your fence/guide, and there are many ways to do that. You can fence the baseplate, use collars and fence those, or use bearing bits and fence those - it's just a matter of offset from the cut line. Cleanly is trickier, and depends on where you need clean. Solid wood trim would allow you to cover your sins, while trying to ...


2

The only problem with a router would be in the corners they will be rounded not totally square. A very small straight bit would give the smallest Chamfer (non square). This last fathers day my wife bought me this set of router bits I thought oh boy how long are these going to last I usually spend 15-20 per bit. The ones I have used have worked well, I ...


2

1) For connecting face frames use 2-1/2" or so #8 wood screws. Pre-drill the holes with a counter sink bit. Best way to hide them is to place them where the hinge hardware will cover them up. 2) For securing the cabinets to the wall use cabinet screws with a nice washer head, not drywall screws. If you need to attach a cabinet to a side wall or adjacent ...


5

While I am not a cabinet maker by trade, I have successfully built two full sets of cabinets (base and uppers) and am currently getting ready to hang my third in my newly renovated kitchen. First, always start with the corner box. If it is not already level, square and secure, you'll want to make it so before attaching the other boxes as it's your ...



Top 50 recent answers are included