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1

1) For connecting face frames use 2-1/2" or so #8 wood screws. Pre-drill the holes with a counter sink bit. Best way to hide them is to place them where the hinge hardware will cover them up. 2) For securing the cabinets to the wall use cabinet screws with a nice washer head, not drywall screws. If you need to attach a cabinet to a side wall or adjacent ...


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While I am not a cabinet maker by trade, I have successfully built two full sets of cabinets (base and uppers) and am currently getting ready to hang my third in my newly renovated kitchen. First, always start with the corner box. If it is not already level, square and secure, you'll want to make it so before attaching the other boxes as it's your ...


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You have two questions. Are face-frame cabinets easier to repair than front-face (Euro style) cabinets? Is particle-board harder to repair than solid wood? The answers to these questions may be different. But how often does this happen? This has never happened to me. I've kicked a hole in an oak door, the hinges were not affected at all. I guess it ...


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The particle board cabinets are cheap. If you ever have a leak in the sink they swell up and start falling apart in a very short time. The cabinets that are made out of particleboard usually do have the hinges screwed into the face when the particle board breaks there is no way to really fix it to look good (without repainting /or a new veneer- Cut the ...


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I think the cabinet would make a great built-in bookcase without any real modifications. Just remove the glass doors if you want unhindered access or visibility to your books. Since books are heavy, though, if you intend to fill the shelves with books, you might want to replace the glass shelves with ¾"-thick plywood shelves.


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The back of the cabinet plays a large role keeping the unit square. My suggestion is to forget about trying to re-work that cabinet. There a bunch of concerns: Cutting off the back 4 to 5 inches would remove the rear shelf support brackets. The internal shelves are glass and would need to be cut or replaced with other materials. There would still need to ...


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The closest answer was #3. The question had 2 parts: The first part answer is: Yes, we can glue 2 solid oak treads to make one tread of minimum thickness 1½" when stair steps more than 39" width. If the steps are less than 39" wide then we can use 1" thick treads. The second part of the question was HOW WOULD YOU DO IT? The answer is to: Rough ...


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why dont you just buy 10/4 rough sawn oak and plane it down to 2"? this is a totally normal day for most staircase guys. i am kind of surprised you are asking this question.


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I am a woodworker and I can tell you 2 glued up pieces would be just as strong. I don't know about code though. Keep in mind, surfaced 1X oak is actually 13/16" thick. 2 of them would be 1-5/8" thick. 1x stair treads might be actual 1" thick.



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