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I would recommend an oil based satin wipe-on poly. I like Watco. It will give you the same look as tung oil but give you better protection, easier clean up in the future, and on something like oak it will be easier to apply (oils tend to weep back out of the pores as they dry which you will have to wipe off several times). Wipe-ons are the same thing as ...


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It's possible-but-unlikely that there's nothing on them. Most likely they were done with a penetrating oil finish, - tung, walnut or linseed oils, or in the most minimal, least-color-changing but non-hardening realm, mineral oil. You could use any of those (use BOILED linseed oil inside, or else that never hardens, either) again, though linseed and tung ...


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Note that you can make something roughly similar to a track saw by throwing together your own saw guide. Cut about a foot off sheet of plywood so you can use the factory edge as a straight edge. Glue-and-screw that on top of another layer of plywood, with its straight edge set back from the lower layer's edge by a bit more than the distance from the edge of ...


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Realizing it is a bit late to help the OP, I am personally a fan of the track saw. One trick I have used to get a repeatable cut is to set a combination square to the desired width. It is very quick to lay the track on the wood, set the square in place, and slide the track to but up against the square. Do it at both ends, then double check for movement. ...


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No glue needed. the angle of the cleat and gravity does to trick. It will not need it but you can run a screw into the framing to solve any issue you may have.


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You want to get off the latex paint as best you can. Using a stripper is likely safest given the chance there that one or more layer is a lead paint and therefore a risk if you're sanding. Use a high quality primer, probably oil based (certainly oil if you use an oil top-coat), to ensure it sticks well. If you can strip it down to the bare wood, you might ...


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To get something that lasts on high traffic touch areas like cabinets you need to go with oil based paint. The latex stuff just doesn't hold up and it will come off or get rubbery with water, changes in temperature (near oven), or a lot of touching (oils and rubbing it). This is especially true when latex is on oil without being primed right. If the ...



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