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16

There are inexpensive child safety latches that can be placed out of sight in the interior of your cabinet. They are also easy to install and only leave a few small screw holes when removed. Some may use adhesive instead of screws, but they might be less dependable. Such a latch consists of a bendable plastic rod with a blunt hook on one side, and is ...


15

Clean out the hole of debris and then carve a tapered peg from another piece of wood that will start into the hole. Fill the hole with wood glue and then pound in your peg. Let it dry overnight and then cut off the remainder of the peg flush with the surface. At this point you can drill a new pilot hole for your screws.


14

If you are lacking a wooden peg or the skills to make one use round wooden toothpicks. Coat the toothpicks with woodglue. Place as many toothpicks in the hole as will fit. Gently tap in one more with a hammer. Break off any bits of toothpick that protrude from the hole. After the glue has dried, reinstall the screw.


11

There are several different types. There are magnetic knobs that require you to place a magnet over the catch before it's released - see here for an example. You leave the existing knobs on the doors which could give you hours of fun as you watch visitors pull at them and wonder why they can't open the door. There are physical catches you can get that ...


11

I'd recommend going with a metal knob that's held in place by a machine screw. They're going to cost more, but they won't get damaged from everyday use, and you don't have to worry about them stripping out. Most of the knobs in my house are metal and take machine screws. I do have to periodically re-tighten them though. Some Blue Loctite might take care of ...


11

I decided to try to install a cross brace inside the cabinet to spread the walls enough so the drawers would fit. I made a trip to the hardware store and picked up: A 1x6 pine board Angle brackets with screws Then I: measured the front opening of the cabinet. cut a piece off the pine board 2mm longer than the cabinet is wide. used a rubber mallet to ...


10

Is cutting out the flooring where the cabinets will be not an option? You don't mention it, so maybe there's a reason, but that's the method that would get you the best attachment for your cabinets, while still allowing the flooring to float and move as it's designed. You could make these cuts with a circular saw set to just the right depth. For the ...


8

There are jigs available at woodwork supply stores to do just what you need, along with special drill bits that will go the proper depth, since you're dealing with existing holes, you might need to find one that will line up with those.


8

Do you need more shelves, or do you just need one of the existing shelves to be at a different height? If it's the latter, it may be easier for you to add some supports underneath one of the existing shelves like this: The supports should run the depth of the cabinet, and you can attach them with command strips or double-sided tape. Be careful removing ...


8

I would use a pocket screw joint. It is generally considered to be a stronger joint, and you can remove the clamps immediately after driving the screws (as opposed to waiting until the glue sets). Along with the strength and speed, it also makes the construction process easier. You don't have to drill 2 separate holes, and then attempt to get the ...


8

Echoing Steven's answer, I wouldn't do kitchen cabinets either. I would get/build a real workbench that can hold 100's of lbs on the surface. If you aren't up to building your own, you can buy some nice-looking kits from Lowe's, Home Depot, Sears, or Sam's Club. Maybe start with a ready-made workbench as the core of your workshop, and build the remaining ...


8

You can get specialized cutters for that sort of thing, but you can do it without, all you need is a drill, hammer, and chisel. You drill 4 holes in the corners of the hole you want, at the depth you want, then chisel out the material in between. A workbench would be handy for this but you could do it on floor if you like. That is a load of work though, so ...


8

They are the remnants from the rivets used to hold the pieces of steel together. Each rivet contains a piece that holds the metal together and a piece that looks similar to a finish nail. When the "nail like" piece is pulled by the riveting tool it distorts the head then breaks off. Pop Rivet set tool grips shank, draws ball head up through tube rivet to ...


7

Several different factors weigh in to what size of board you need. Weight - Definitely the major factor. Stud spacing - I'm assuming you've got standard 16" OC studs, and that you're attaching the support board to every one it spans. Location of Mounting Points - The closer the mounts for the shelving are to centered between studs, the higher the bending ...


7

When installing cabinets, the "go-to" method is to "hang" them on a rail that you install first. The idea is that the rail, being much lighter and less bulky, is easier to put in place, get level, and then screw into the studs. Sometimes it's just one rail, sometimes two; depends on the cabinet system. The rail should be securely screwed into every stud ...


7

Yes you can do this. You need a hinge cutter: For best effect, use with a drill press if at all possible. You can accurately set the depth of cut and keep it perpendicular to the panel. As long as the material you are using for the door is thick enough at the location where you need to place the hinge.


6

If you are not averse to designing/building the cabinets yourself, it is not a terribly difficult project to execute. You don't even need a wood shop, only a few select tools. Seek out a local full service lumberyard or specialty wood shop (not a big box store, a real lumberyard). If you bring a cut list of panels that you need, they will usually charge ...


6

There are a number of online calculators related to the problem in the answers & comments to an earlier question about building shelves: What are cheap ways to build strong shelves with a large span? References included: The Sagulator (sag calculator for different types of wood & related materials) Elastic Beam Deflection Calculator (can handle ...


6

Not only are they "nail-on" glides, they are "nylon" glides. Similar pronunciation, different meaning. Nylon glides are good for most interior durable hard floors like tile, laminate, linoleum, etc. You'll want to use felt glides for furniture on hardwood (solid or engineered) and other easily-marred floor surfaces (Plexiglas anyone?), and metal glides on ...


6

While having all four mount points connect to structure (aka: the stud) is ideal, I think in your case, having two mount points in wood and two in a drywall anchor, you're going to be ok. Consider this question: What is the weight capacity of a drywall screw? One drywall screw CAN (not should) hold a lot of weight for its size. Also a properly installed ...


6

One way to avoid splintering the front of the drawer is to clamp a small piece of wood on top of the area to be drilled, and drill through that bit of wood, into the front of the drawer. This should (if you have the clamp firm) prevent any sparring or splintering on the finished surface of the cabinet drawer. Try it on an inconspicuous area first (like a ...


6

You can use wood filler if you're painting the cabinets. Use a putty knife to apply, and then sand even after it dries. Alternatively, if you're going to stain the cabinets, you can use a plug cutter that matches the countersink diameter. Using matching scrap wood, cut a plug that has a similar grain pattern, and lightly tap it in the hole after applying ...


6

While I can't speak to the quality of all manufacturers blades, in general the blade that comes with the saw is of no lower quality than any other blade offered by the manufacturer. Most miter saws come with a 24 tooth FTG (Flat Top Grind) blade, which is good for fast course cuts. If you're looking to chop 2x lumber, this blade will work fine for you. If ...


5

Remove the screw and hinge. Break apart a wooden toothpick and place a few pieces in the existing hole. For extra help, you can combine the pieces of toothpick with a little wood glue. This will help hold them in place before the door is back on and also add extra stability once dry. Then put the door back on and use the existing screw. This should help ...


5

Dowels work but biscuits are so much easier. They're a weaker joint, but are much faster to construct. A Rockler Blog post on the subject states: What we hear most – and agree with - is that biscuits joints serve best as a quick and easy way to keep glue-up parts in alignment, and that they add appreciable pull-apart to strength joints that would be ...


5

II would say you are fine (and you may have been fine before, who knows). You have replaced the screws that hold the cabinets to the studs, and those are the ones that hold the cabinets up. The ones in the face just keep the faces flush, so if one ever breaks, do the repair then. Hope this helps.


5

For the floor cabinets that are not a part of the peninsula- Fixing them to the wall and each other is sufficient. Make sure to either fix them to a stud, or if they have fixed mounting points that don't align with studs, use a 3/16" toggle bolt. For the peninsula- I'd recommend anchoring them to the floor, or, as you say, they'll be prone to move (And ...


5

I don't believe the thickness of the cleat is as critical as the type of wall anchor being used. The cleat holds the cabinet in place, but it's the anchors which are really bearing the weight. I would make my decision based on the type of wall material holding the cabinet and use an anchor rated for the expected weight of the cabinet for that particular ...


5

Just to stop the ugliness, I would just get a can of Rust-Oleum gloss enamel (black, white, whatever), then remove the hinges from the cabinets. Clean them thoroughly, and if there's any existing lacquer or hardcoat, try roughing them up with a bit of steel wool. If you can completely disassemble each hinge, that would be ideal; otherwise, work a small ...



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