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12

In the cases where I've run I to something like this, the hotel originally had open walkways around the rooms -- allowing more light in, and probably cheaper to build -- which were later closed off with an outside wall to provide a sheltered approach to the rooms and to reduce energy needed to heat or cool the rooms. The windows were left in place because ...


6

First of all, building codes covering private residences are typically not the same as larger commercial buildings. In the USA those are often the IRC and IBC, respectively (although each state has their own versions and amendments). But to the issue you asked about: were the windows into the hallway operable? Hotel windows are usually inoperable and are ...


3

I realize this is an old question, however I just wanted to mention something... Tester101 indicated not to drill too many holes within the joist, as it could weaken it and cause structural damage. I thought I should clarify something... The principal force that is applied to a floor joist is moment. With that, you get tensile along the bottom edge, and ...


1

You don't need "Building Control" (in the UK, called planning permission) approval for this. The requirement in UK building regulations only extends to mains voltage. A PoE injector is typically 48 volts or lower - not something that is covered by current regulations. Just remember to take all the usual precautions (outdoor grade cabling, secure fixings ...


1

Piping run concealed in finished spaces has to be installed through the joists and protected from physical damage. Or be run in black or galvanized steel. Or you could box the pipe run and shield it. Also, a flexible appliance connector has a length limit of 6 feet. Code quotes are from the 2012 IRC SECTION G2415 (404) PIPING SYSTEM INSTALLATION ...


6

Can you do it, sure. Should you do it, no way. If you ever want to sell your house, it probably won't pass inspection if the inspector finds it like that If your house ever catches fire due to that wiring your homeowners insurance will not cover it.


5

This varies greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It also depends on what kind of work and how much. In many locations, minor electrical work, in-kind plumbing replacement, interior construction that does not change the overall footprint or the number or types of bedrooms, bathrooms, etc, (such as the building of a closet in an existing room) need no ...


3

If it's officially considered "habitable space", then it's a finished basement and GFCI is not required. AFCI protection is required. An AFCI breaker, is probably the cheapest and easiest way to provide the protection.


11

I recommend combining a recessed outlet box, outlet with usb charging, and right angle usb cable.


5

As alluded to above, the obvious answer is to get a large clock receptacle (just google it), e.g., http://www.amazon.com/Arlington-DVFR2W-1-Recessed-Electrical-Paintable/dp/B001XQ4JFC -- with this one you can go to town, mount whatever you want in it. And you'll need a 90 degree micro USB adapter to make the charging cable go away. Ebay has stuff like ...


10

As pointed out by many others at this point, direct answer to your question is No: you are not allowed to install an outlet inside a wall. All outlets and junctions must be accessible without having to modify building structure or components. I would skip the high voltage entirely here and use Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) on Cat5e/6 cables to bring power to ...


16

You can use a recessed outlet to hide the wires. These were originally created so wall mounted electrical clocks can be mounted flush. They are now pretty commonly used for home theater setups where the TV is mounted to the wall, so there aren't any visible wires. Something like this could work for your tablet setup. You would just have to make sure that ...


35

No. Section 314.29 of the National Electrical Code (adopted in some form in most localities in the US) requires that all outlet boxes be accessible without removing any part of the building or structure. That includes wallboard. You could build a recessed section in the wall that has an easily removed front panel. You could install an outlet in that ...


2

Yes, this allowed according to recent versions of the IRC building code. (If your state or region has a different building code you will need to look it up yourself or specify.) To quote the code: R310.1 Emergency escape and rescue required. Basements and every sleeping room shall have at least one operable emergency and rescue opening. Such opening ...


0

The only answer is to ask your inspector. I can't see why in any case this would pose a problem as you have doors. The whole point of the egress is accessibility. Your basement has to two points in two different areas and really whether you have a door there or not.


1

If the red flaps on the red wall are doors, you should be fine, so long as the doors are and remain functional, and cannot be locked in the egress direction - i.e. from the "family room" to the office.


1

I can't find regulation 3. Follow this trail from http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/buildingregulations/ Building Policy and Legislation Current Legislation Building Regulations Building Regs Legislation 2010 The Building Regulations 2010 (SI 2010/2214) Part 2, 3. Meaning of Building Work Which leads you to The Building Regulations 2010, No. 2214, ...



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