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I'm not sure that complete removal is an option. As a result, the way I would tackle this is as follows: First, remove as much as possible with scraping. Next, paint (matching the brick color). If that still doesn't provide an acceptable asthetic, cover it up. Contact the window manufacturer to find out what stain was used and make a trim piece of wood ...


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"is it possible the rain is being driven into the weep holes?" yes, but the weep holes are supposed to be on the outside of a moisture barrier, so rain driven in still should not enter the house. "is this more likely clogged weep holes?" no, the holes are designed to "weep", and are difficult to completely clog. "is this an issue with the way it was ...


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Just drill the damn thing out, I do it all the time removing old ones flush or not! Oh use same bit you drilled the hole with!


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Pulling it out with long nose pliers is one option, but it often comes out in pieces if you do that. If you want to pull it out with a screw, you need to engage the screw enough to grip the plastic, but not enough to make it expand. This position may not exist, or if may be further out than you think. Sometimes a screw engaged just 2-3 turns will give you ...


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You definitely want to leave an expansion gap. However, you can fill the seam using a flexible material. Foam rod covered with a seam filler, is one common solution. There are also products sold that can simply be pushed into the seam. Check your local hardware/home improvement store, to see what's available in your area.


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Depending on the local conditions, there may be a water proofing issue. Cementitious products (concrete and cement mortar) shrink due to the hydration process of cement. So your mortar joint will become slightly contracted. Clay bricks expand when they are moist and contract when they dry out. So the wider the joints are, the more the differential between ...



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