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1

Go to the inside face of an external wall and knock on it. If it sounds hollow, then you (probably) have plasterboard over a timber frame, meaning the external bricks are cladding only. If it sounds solid, then you (probably) have a structural brick cavity wall. This method isn't foolproof (for example you might have a structural brick wall where somebody ...


0

We had the same problem. Our chimney had some repair work done to it and the new mortar did not match the old mortar color. We fixed it ourselves by using a product we found online called Instant Mortar Match. The website is InstantMortarMatch.com. They sent us a color card, so we could pick out the best color to use. Then we just brushed it on the ...


5

Open a window and measure from the face of the brick to the inside wall. If it's 14 plus inches, that's at least two courses of brick. It will be obvious if it is; questionable if it's any less thick than that. One brick (4") and a 2x4 stud wall = ~8" Two bricks and a stud = ~12" Add 1" if it's lath and plaster; add 1/2" for drywall. Allow another 1/2" ...


8

The frame is of wood. The brick is a cladding on the outside. It is not a veneer. A veneer is fake layer of thin brick-like parquets that are secured with a cement or glue to a backing of some kind. In other words a stone or brick veneer does not have full-sized bricks. Your house does have full-size bricks, but they are not used for structural purposes. It ...


12

One way is by looking at the bond of the bricks. Your bricks are arranged in a running bond or stretcher bond, which is always one brick thick: To be a structural brick wall it would have to be more than one brick thick, or have multiple wythes, and you would see headers, like this: It's likely your walls are wood-framed with single-wythe brick veneer ...


1

I know that your question is a couple of years old, but I thought I'd post an answer in case you haven't figured out a solution yet. We had a chimney on our house that had been repaired. The new mortar did not end up being the same color as the old mortar that was used. We found a product online called Instant Mortar Match. The website is ...


1

This is a standard case of brickwork needing to be tuck-pointed. You can find several sources on how to do it, but this one is nice:This Old House


0

You remove the old brick and rebuild the bottom of the mortise. If it was me, I would get a tile saw and cut a single rock that would exactly fit. Why use crappy brick, when you can use a rock that will last for a million years? If you cut the rock so that it exactly fits (and I mean EXACTLY to a hundredth of inch). Then you hammer the rock in tight and you ...


0

Here's what I did (probably a little over-engineered but it worked well) Filled current holes and the surrounding mess Got 135mm long, 7mm screws with wall plugs, and drilled 10mm holes for them Located the holes 50mm above the current holes, 50mm being approximately half a course of bricks Whilst drilling I think the problem might have been that I'd ...


1

One trick is to undersize the holes required for the rawl plugs you use. E.g. if a 6mm bit is specified for the plugs, use a 4mm bit to drill the hole. I've used this trick to work with older/crumbly plaster walls many times (both on brick and with wood lathe). Note this is really just a workaround - RedGrittyBrick has the answer for a permanent fix to ...



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