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11

I think you may have a problem brewing there. I have never heard of bricks being glued in a situation like this. Normally paving bricks will be set on a compacted base of stone dust and very fine packing gravel, then the joints are filled with fine mason sand. Mortar is rarely used, especially in cold climates as it will crack with any movement associated ...


11

The white powdery substance is called efflorescence. It's bascially mineral salts leaching out of the masonry. The efflorescence itself may not be anything more than a cosmetic problem, however the appearance of efflorescence indicates that there's moisture present in the masonry. This is not entirely surprising--you're talking about an old brick wall ...


10

I won’t say I'm an expert; I've worked with someone doing something similar in the past and may at least give you some guidance. Personally, I would use a concrete saw (larger blade than an angle grinder) and/or a chisel to cut the opening. Make sure you have help as you DO NOT want to drop the removed section(s). You can use these bricks later (see below). ...


10

Technically you could use some device for precision grinding like Dremel with some diamond bit with an extender to make it long enough, but that's almost mission impossible to do. First, you risk damaging the existing cable. Second, doing such job in a hard material when the hole is long and narrow will take too much time and precision to be worth it. You ...


9

Adding a brick facade to the lower front of your house may not be as easy as you may think. Your contractor may have issues with installing a footing to support the weight and proper backing to attach the brick ties, not to mention building out all the window and door jams to match the new depth. This could be a very expensive change. As far as adding ...


8

There's two ways off hand that I've used in the past -- knock it off with a chipping hammer, or grind it off using an angle grinder and disk. The chipping hammer is actually easiest because you don't spend time fighting the tool or securing the work piece. Have a stiff wire brush on hand to remove the final bits and pieces that the chipping hammer doesn't ...


7

Is it the bottom row of bricks, and are they regularly spaced? (I guess that's only possible if your foundation comes up 40cm.) Because if that's the case, they're weep holes, and shouldn't be filled in. Otherwise, I'd go with @Tester101's answer.


7

Make sure you clean the joint very well (with a stiff bristle brush) making sure you remove all dust and debris from the crack. Mix up some mortar and put it in something similar to a pastry bag (the thing bakers use to decorate with). A large Zip-Lock bag with a nipped corner should work. Squeeze the bag so the mortar fills the gap making sure the mortar ...


7

Let me first say, being originally from the UK my understanding of "wall tie" might be different from your particularly definition/situation. "The wall is brick on the outside and block on the inside" that to me describes Cavity Wall construction ie the outer and inner leaves of brickwork/blockwork are tied together with wall ties, normally spaced at 450mm ...


7

If you don't have the proper structure under the area, you're not going to want to use full sized bricks for this project. Brick walls require proper concrete footings to support the massive amount of weight, if you don't have the ability to add the footings you won't be able to build a brick wall here. In situations like this, veneer will likely be your ...


6

If your house was built before the 1940's, it's probably a layer of wood lath, followed by a standard 2x4 stud wall with no insulation. Perhaps some knob-and-tube wiring just to make things interesting. The plaster will make more dust than you thought possible (wear a mask). After the 1940's, it's probably gypsum board, but without the foaming agents and ...


6

Q1: I would try a stiff brush and water. If this does not work, you may be able to try a muriatic acid solution, but I would look at the manufacturer's recommendations first. Depending on the brick color and type, this may discolor the brick. Q2: Apply the grout using a grout bag to minimize the mess. When the joints are filled, wait until the grout ...


6

I don't think it is much of an issue with individual materials. In general most of them last a long time, and when they do fail, they simply get replaced. Of course, it can be a problem if the item that is failing cannot easily be replaced. Off the top of my head I think the only issue could be the foundation. Many homes built that long ago did not ...


6

As the comment said, a heat gun may make scraping this off much easier. First, try scraping some off without a heat gun. You might get lucky and it might "break" off the surface in large solid pieces. If it does, the heat gun might make it more difficult. If it does not come off easily, then I'd try the heat gun. Start a low temperature and work your way ...


6

I did this exact thing a few years ago in a friend's house. The steps I took: Remove lime efflorescence from the brick by spraying on some diluted white vinegar, then scrubbing with a stiff-bristled nylon brush. Leave to dry. Prime and seal (there were some smoke stains on the brick) the fireplace with Kilz latex spray primer. Leave to dry. Paint with ...


6

In the aeronautical industry, we have this saying "If it looks ugly, it flies ugly" which has proven out in that aerodynamic design needs certain sleek lines and cobbled together garbage just doesn't have what it takes. Same goes for the building industry. Despite the cosmetics of Stucco and the willingness to absolve the builder because it "doesn't look ...


6

Rick, that is an impossible question to answer with the info you have supplied. The condition may be bad, but you need to access or have accessed the structural integrity of the shell. This doesn't sound like it's gonna be a DIY project, so my advise is to get some professional evaluation and a few quotes for a restoration and the demolition. Once you know ...


5

If it's a floating laminate floor (i.e. it isn't glued to the floor, but just rests on a foam underlay or padding) then you shouldn't attach the flooring to the walls at any point. You can cover the spaces around the edges of the walls with baseboard, but this should just rest on the floor, not be connected to it in any way. This is because a floating floor ...


5

What you are looking for is a joint sand stabilizing sealer. That should prevent washout as well as weed growth in the joints.


5

I highly recommend using Wiremold for this kind of project, but it depends on the aesthetics that you are going for. 1/2" EMT when bent properly gives a really neat look on exposed brick. Using a pipe bender takes a bit of skill and practice, but can be an art form on it's own. I really don't like the idea of channeling into brick (or block) because: It ...


5

With only 15lbs, two screws (one on each side) ought to do just fine. Just drill into the mortar with a hammer drill and an appropriately sized bit, then use either a sleeve type anchor with the screws, or you could just use a couple tapcon type screws as well.


5

When we did this, we purchased edging to match the laminate. The edging snaps into a channel, which can be attached to the floor - either glued or screwed, depending on the sub floor. I found after a couple of years the edging came up a bit, but a bit of glue in the channel fixed that.


5

Quikrete mortar repair sounds like it would do the trick.


5

The brickwork on a chimney breast of a 1900s house will be solid brick (not veneer). Cutting a channel, fitting trunking and replastering is eminently sensible if that's the only way to go. It's also a job you can do your self with a masonry drill and cold chisel. Using an SDS drill with a chisel attachment will be quicker if messier. Make sure you take ...


5

My wife and I collected an assortment of old house wall bricks from various sources on craigs list and put them down in a patio in the mid-Atlantic a couple years ago. They're on packed gravel and sand with no mortar, laid flat in a herring bone pattern. We've had only one issue which is that some of the bricks were of the softer, less dense variety (light ...


5

It is entirely possible to construct a 6 inch hole in brickwork. The problem with a round hole rather than a square hole is where the hole cuts across joints in the masonry leaving small triangular pieces of masonry over the hole. These tend to be fairly week so are best avoided. You would therefore have to position the circular hole carefully so that is ...


5

Assuming the drill you have is working properly, you may have dull or worn bits. A masonry bit does not last long, especially in concrete or brick. Cheap bits are no bargain. Start with a new bit, when the speed of boring slows to about half or less, time for a new bit.


5

I usually just poke them into the wall (unless they are the screw in kind obviously, or the kind with a large collar). Put a screw driver on them and give it a sharp whack, then patch the hole. I find it's easier and faster to patch the slightly larger hole, than it is to try and dig them out and then patch the hole anyway. For the larger collar ones, try ...



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