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When there's only one washer, that could be due to someone forgetting to put on a second washer during initial assembly, or when the item in question was last taken apart and reassembled - there's no absolute guarantee that where the washer was, before you took it off, is where it's supposed to go. While the odds favor putting the washer under the nut, ...


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For a cheaper fix than some of the above answers mentioned, two thoughts came to my mind: dental floss - wind around the bolt or screw. Scotch tape - This is what I used for my loose LED flashlight, and now it works like a charm.


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The answer to the above (I learned this after trying to actually do it) was this: you can not do it. this is not going to work, not in a decent or acceptable way There is two type of bolt down post supports like the one I posted in my initial message. The one that you are looking at in my initial message needs the concrete foot to be around 10" diameter ...


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If you haven't poured concrete yet, use "anchor bolts". (Ref: Simpson Strong-Tie Model # SSTB16-R, for a visual, though it's probably too long and wrong diameter.) I'd use ones around 12-16" long and as big a diameter as will fit. Get galvanized. Bolt them into the base (nut on top and bottom) and use that to maintain alignment while the concrete sets. Once ...


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I'm going to guess, but it might be an 'outside corner bracket'? You could modify a standard corner brackets countersunk openings by using a countersunk bit on the reverse-side of the bracket.


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Luckily your mount has slots for the bolts so you have a bit of room to work. Get another (stronger, higher quality) lag bolt and put it in right beside the broken one. Leave a tiny bit of room between them if you can, but make sure it still solidly hits the stud. Predrill the hole. To find the right size, hold the bolt up behind your drill bit. The ...


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It depends on what kind of zinc coating you mean. Your basic (cheapest) lag screw or bolt is "bright zinc" plated and will not withstand ACQ lumber. I believe the Triple Zinc used on say Simpson and USC structural connectors is a different process (galvanized). Even their fasteners are hot-dip galvanized or stainless steel.


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I think what you have are similar to these, sleeve and taper nut anchor bolts: source If you're real lucky, the nuts are still properly positioned and you can screw bolts back into them. I wouldn't bother though, my preferred masonry screws are Tapcons. I thought this question was going to be about lead wedge anchors, which if not totally deformed, you ...



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