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43

Washers are used for multiple purposes when mechanical parts are assembled using bolts and nuts. Here are some usages and as you can see it is not likely that a generalized answer can be devised to directly answer your question! Some washers have a special design that attempts to help keep the nut and/or bolt from coming loose. Known as a lock washer these ...


20

That's likely a cleanout for your sewer line. When opened, you can run an snake down the line to remove any blockage without ripping out your entire foundation. Here's what it would look like from the side: And the cap itself can have different styles:


14

I start by hand tightening as much as I can, then I tighten a little on each side and check if the toilet moves. If it does then I tighten a bit more, check and repeat until there's no movement. You're trying to avoid bowl movement, so that it doesn't shift or fall over, not to hold the floor up by the toilet bolts. As tight as you can go will probably ...


11

After cutting the bolt to length, use a stationary grinder instead of a file to clean up your work. With a grinder, it's easy to square up the end of the bolt and apply the chamfer that you want. Just be careful, especially if the bolt is shorter than the grinder's table. If the bolt is short, use a pair of vice grips to hold the bolt during grinding. And ...


9

I would try a Dremel type tool with an abrasive cutoff wheel. Of course you need to be careful of the porcelain. I've cut many screws and bolts this way. If you can't cut the bolt, you may be able to cut the nut, in the direction of the bolt's axis, then pry the nut apart at the cut line.


8

Unless your holes match the bolt size very precisely (like, you have to hammer the bolts home), you will get racking, which will weaken the joint over time. Likewise, the bolts will loosen up (use lock washers and check it frequently). It's something you'll have to watch for; as the holes get stretched, you'll need to figure out what to do. Think about how ...


8

Lock nuts and carriage bolts are a bad combination and even worse when trying to use them in material like particle board or MDF. You could try to use a Tee nut from the monitor side and then simply use a short hex head bolt into the Tee nut.


7

A welded connection can always be made the same strength as the original steel by using a full penetration but weld but this all depends on the quality of the materials used for the welding and the quality of the welding itself. Therei s a very good reason why there is a lot of non destructive testing used when welded joints are being used for structural ...


7

The caps come with a washer-type thing that they clip into: Your toilet clearly does not have these clips. Using silicone is most definitely not the correct way to attach these, so maybe the installer lost the clips or just has never installed a toilet before? It's normal to cut the bolts to length, as the length needed depends on the thickness of your ...


7

It's called a spanner slotted (or slotted spanner) head. Useful site here. Hard to find in the UK, why the owner used one I cannot imagine. Screwfix doesn't have them. This site may do, although it is international. You'll need to figure out the correct size before you order. Alternatively get a real cheap flat-head screwdriver the right width and file ...


6

[Gregmac beat me to the problem description, but see the steps to fix it below.] The snap on caps often come with a plastic piece that goes under the washer. This is what the cap snaps onto, and without it, it won't stay down securely. It looks like the contractor forgot about those, or possibly you have a style that doesn't require it and it snaps on a ...


6

If there is only one washer used with a nut/bolt, it usually goes on the nut side. The nut in most circumstances is more movable, and is more commonly turned to tighten the assembly. The washer helps prevent damage to the surface of the object being fastened. In most cases where the bolt is easier to turn, the bolt has a round head that will cause less ...


6

Are you using an eye bolt or an eye screw? OR         For an eye screw, glue won't do much and is not needed. (Although some glues may act as a lubricant when you first screw-in the eye-screw.) Use bar soap or beeswax as a lubricant. For an eye bolt, especially if you want it to be able to pivot, use appropriate washers, plus two nuts with a lock-washer ...


6

DANGER DANGER DANGER.... As we speak, I am replacing an entire 5 foot knee wall 20 feet long, jacking the floor joists, new studs, mold remediation, new sills, new top plates, new insulation, floor joist sisters, a very expensive 6 foot slider is in jeopardy. This fix is gonna cost my customer over $3,000 minimum Ants and rot everywhere, all the way to the ...


5

One thing that will help prevent the porcelain cracking is to use a rubber or plastic washer between the head of the bolt and the bowl. This will take the "excess" force by deforming slightly, and by checking for the washer deforming as you tighten you'll have an extra visual check that you've applied enough force.


4

Based on the clarifications, I would recommend using a reusable thread-locking liquid. Here is a link to one I found that may work. I have not used it. Vibra-Tite VC3 Threadmate http://www.vibra-tite.com (I am in no way affiliated with the Vibra-Tite Company)


4

You can get toilet bolt covers in a variety of styles. The ones pictured by gregmac are a common type that use a plastic washer to which the cap snaps onto. I recently purchased another style that has a cap with an internal threaded part that screws onto the toilet bolt end. The cap kit comes with several sizes of the threaded inserts to adapt to different ...


4

your question is "what is this thing called", and I agree that T-nut is a good answer, but when you described your application, perhaps what you're looking for could be called a "leveling foot".


3

You have the basics down pat. The key to getting the threads working properly is: Squaring off the thread end of the bolt. Yes, the hacksaw blade will follow the threads slightly. If you have a bandsaw with a stock holding vise that can be squared to the blade, run a single nut on so the hexes will hold the bolt in place as straight to the blade as ...


3

You are doing it the optimal way for somebody that just does it occaisonally. A cut that is more square across the bolt (OK - orthogonal...) can be had by using a motorized chop saw with an abrasive blade, an a grinder will help the clean-up, like Caleb says. If you were to do it this way, you don't need the nut threaded on to clean out the threads. ...


3

You may have a damaged/stripped bolt or threaded hole. Check to see if the threads on the bolt are damaged then you will need to purchase a new bolt. If the threads in the hole are damaged you will need to install a threaded insert or use a tap and die set.


3

Are you comfortable with cutting the bolt to a length between 2" and 3"? That would be simplest. Another possibility would be to use another piece of wood between your shelf and the wall to create more thickness for the 3" bolts. If the concrete is actually concrete block, you can drill into that quite easily with a masonry bit from your local hardware ...


3

The torque on the bolt is highest when the blade is engaged. Be careful when thinking of this since as the blade is engaged and accelerates, the blade itself—due to the acceleration (or resistance of that acceleration by the blade itself)—wants to "slip" in the opposite direction. This "slip direction" should be the direction that tightens the ...


3

You can often get a box-type ratchet wrench around those recessed nuts These often come in sets. They are a bit pricey but have many uses. While you can also use a standard box wrench (a closed loop without the ratchet), in tight places, placing the wrench, advancing it a fraction of a turn, freeing the wrench, resetting it and turning again can get ...


3

Don't underestimate what that little wrench will do, or how much torque you need to hold the bed rails together. With the lock washer, it only needs to be compressed, plus maybe another half turn at the most. The force created by the threads drawing through the nut create an incredible amount of pressure on the joining faces. The included wrench has 2 ...


2

Under perfect conditions this is not true. However most of us are unable to weld something under perfect conditions. There is always the risk of contaminants, imperfect welds, incorrect temperatures, etc. This holds true even in many industrial factories. For this reason, some very high end cars have their frames glued together instead of welded. You ...


2

A great tool for this purpose and any similar close work is a ultrasonic multitool such as a Fein, Rockwell etc. Lots of tool companies are making them now. the other tool would be a hacksaw blade holder. It is not a full framed hacksaw, rather a handle that holds the blade and can get into tight places. Remember, save yourself a lot of frustration and use ...


2

Drill a hole, or a recess, into the bottom plate of the prefab wall, so the bolts holding the sill plate to the concrete just slide right in/through. Or, drill a similar recess into the sill plate, recess the nut into the sill plate (probably with a washer to spread the load over the thinner wood), and grind/cut the bolt off level with the top of the ...



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