Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

If these are slatted miniblinds, each of the vertical strings goes down through the bottom rail and is held in place by a little button. Once you pop out those buttons with a small screwdriver, the strings are free and you can remove the bottom rail. Then you can un-thread the extra slats and re-thread the bottom rail back on, cut the strings and replace ...


6

As 'cheap' is one of the requirements -- I'd probably go with a random orbit or even just a vibrating palm sander. You can get some decent models for $50-60. I would recommending one of the 1/4 sheet models, where you can use any sand paper that you cut down to size, rather than the fancy shapes that require you to specifically buy sand paper made for that ...


5

You really want cheap? Get one of those rubber disks in a shaft that you can put into an electric drill and fit it with sandpaper, suitable disks of which are usually sold at the same place. It shouldn't cost more than a few dollars all up. Perhaps surprisingly, this is likely to cause less tear-out than things like belt or orbital sanders because it's ...


5

The brackets have pulled out because they were not properly attached to a structural member. The best fix in this situation would be to take the blinds down, and reinstall them properly by attaching them to studs/joists. While most blinds come with those small "anchors", these are almost never sufficient to support the blinds. The best way to install any ...


4

Honestly, vertical blind sets are so relatively inexpensive that if you've lost/broken this many slats I would seriously consider replacing the entire vertical blind. There are blind sets available from HIW stores as cheaply as $20. Even if you don't want to actually replace the whole thing, a kit like this is cheap enough to justify cannibalizing it for ...


4

Assuming that you have masonry walls, you need masonry drill bits and masonry anchors, which are somewhat different than the molly anchors you find for use with hanging on plaster. Any masonry anchor style should do - as long as you size it appropriately for the item to be hung.


3

Tools Hammer Drill The job will be much easier with a hammer drill, or a drill with a hammer option. Though it can be done using a regular drill, given enough time and patience. Masonry Bit You'll also want to put a masonry bit in that hammer drill. A carbide bit is the choice of champions. Method Squeeze, Push, and Wait Put the tip of the bit ...


3

I upvoted Joe's answer. However, I thought of an alternative tool to consider: an oscillating multi-tool. They can sand small/narrow areas (just how big are your slats anyway)? They also work well as a little power saw or grinder. If you really only need to shave 1mm off the edge of the blinds, the cutting features may not get much use. However, if you ...


3

Your best bet for sanding would be a belt sander. It will take it off in a hurry with agressive belts. You probably want to use something like 80 - 120 grit. An ideal solution would be to get a table mounted belt sander with a fence to rest the wood againt. A hand held belt sander will work OK, you will just have to clamp the wood down and hold the sander ...


3

You could try pricing out some simple vinyl roller shades. They typically come in widths up to 96" and lengths up to 120". You can mount them outside of the window frame, so each shade can span multiple windows.


3

I'm not sure how window shades would be costing so much, have you seen blackout curtains? I have also seen suggested fitting the window with thick styrofoam pieces. This is very cheap and easily removable, but not very pretty. Another option is tinfoil. Over a few years the sun begins to eat at the foil and small holes appear.


3

I have 2" blinds from Lowes, probably the same one. Our windows had enough over hang though. If I recall, there are little metal rectangle boxes that get mounted / screwed into the top of the window, and then the the blinds slide into the little metal box to hold it in place. These little metal brackets have numerous holes in them on both the side, and on ...


2

The best is to block the sun from the outside. Options there would be: plant a tree (pro: green; con: might take a few decades to get full effect) awnings (pro: do great at blocking summer sun; con: costs a bit, takes some maintenance, can block views) As for the windows themselves, are they high-efficiency? Ideally you'd have triple-pane glass with ...


2

If your room is upstairs, have your blinds tilted upwards; the opposite if downstairs. At night, turn on your lights and slant your blind the way you like and go outside and see how little you can see (if at all). Having bigger blinds will make it so there are fewer gaps but still the angle is the main issue. I doubt if the neighbors really pay too much ...


2

I was looking for information and the best link I found was http://zebbakes.com/2011/06/21/how-to-uninstall-a-velux-black-out-blind/, which was both informative and amusing. It says to take a flat-head screwdriver, wrap it in a cloth, and then insert it between blind and glass, then twist it in small increments until the blind pops out by brute force. It ...


2

My 70 year old grandma just put up new blinds in her house last year. She did borrow my makita. Quick Tips make sure you are putting your screws into either the window frame, wood framing, or use anchors make sure your blinds are level so if blinds are outside of window frame either use a level or take a measurement from the top of each side cut blinds ...


2

There are numerous timer switches that replace a conventional switch in a wall box. For example, this is a seven day timer from Honeywell The wiring for simple timers is pretty straightforward. Usually you simply replace the existing switch and wire the new switch the same way. Often you need to add a neutral wire to the switch, and most recently wired ...


1

They're not to everyone's taste. They roll up into a large box above the window -- either inside or outside. And they are more expensive than blinds. Maybe Europeans like them for the noise and privacy factor and that may not be as much of a concern here in the states. Having said that I have wished many times that I had them in my house. Favorite feature is ...


1

You can get custom made curtains in any size you want. They are also sold in different sizes from ones that only cover half a window to ones that will reach all the way to the floor and more. If you find a fabric you like you can look for a local seamstress to make them for you locally if you don't have a friend or family member that likes to sew. Same ...


1

We have the exact same situation (bay window with 5 panes and 5 independent blinds) and I have toyed with the idea of mechanically ganging them all together. The point where the twisting rod enters turns a cam which is coupled to a pulley system to tilt the slats. I posit that an appropriate line wrapped around each "twister" could do all of them at once. ...


1

Using plain screws into just about any material other than wood or metal will not provide a strong support, especially if the weight that the screw is supporting is trying to pull the screw shank straight out (rather than pulling across the shank of the screw). From your pictures, the surface appears to be plasterboard (or less likely, plaster), which has ...


1

I can't talk about uninstalling your current blinds. Although, I found installing blinds pretty easy and fast. To be honest, the hardest part is probably taking the width of your windows, especially if you mount them inside. Most manufacturers will tell you in advance that you are responsible for your measures. In short, you need a measuring tape, a ...


1

Something like Craft Plastic would probably do the trick. You can generally find Craft Plastic at arts and craft stores - its used commonly in scrap-booking. A bit of an unusual item for a DIY question but in this case, appropriate, I think.


1

Look for some black out shades. They come in several styles and colors. The fit is important so measure carefully. Once they are closed, little to no outside light comes through. Good luck http://www.levolor.com/products/blinds/customsizenow/cellular-shades/


1

While this question may be ambiguous or style based I will try to give the best answer I can and let more qualified hands cast close votes. I would recommend sheers. They allow plenty of light in, but obscure the inside of your apartment enough to allow some privacy. In terms or hardware, they are extremely easy to set up, if you have a recessed alcove ...


1

Wanting to shade your entire room is a by-product of wanting it to be dark enough to sleep at night, which is your real problem. Have you considered a sleep mask? Seriously. It may solve your problem (if you can tolerate it) and is by orders of magnitude the cheapest solution… I had the very same problem in an old apartment with stucco ceiling and no ...


1

I've been thru this, and option #1 is probably the best way to go. If you go with a company that specializes in blinds, you'll discover that there are many different types - some are translucent, others are designed to keep out all the light. Having custom-fitted blackout blinds might be worthwhile, even if it's just for the bedroom. I don't know what ...


1

I might not have as many windows as you based on the prices you're mentioning, but I've been just fine with curtains ... no fancy, automatic opening things, just plain, simple, curtains. My neighbors use blackout curtains where they have a projector set up, so we can watch movies on the big screen during the day, and they can get their room to the point ...


1

You don't need a sander for this; use elbow grease. Get some sand paper and do it by hand. You have good access to the ends and you don't need precision/smoothness. Gang them all together and have at it.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible