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Depending on where you are located this is probably not legal. In the USA in most building jurisdictions every bedroom has to have an exterior escape (ie. a window that meets the size requirements for a human to escape through). Also, USA NEC electrical code requires receptacles to be placed so that no point along the floor/wall line is more than 6 feet ...


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"My wife has found that sleeping on an incline helps. I'm trying to test this." To confirm her findings, or that you can sleep on it? --Two cinder-blocks and one brick makes for 20 inches to test it. Confirm this and then proceed. Personally, I'd build it like a deck: The structure using 2x6's or larger, joist hangers, blocking, and on 16" centers. With ...


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In college, I made a loft for my twin XL mattress with a 2"x6" runner on one side and a 1/2"x6" plywood runner on the other. On the inside of each runner was a 2"x4" wide side flat against the runner, and flush with the bottom edge. 2"x4"s were then laid crosswise between the runners, on top of the supports. They were space with 1" gaps the whole length of ...


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With some nails and some 2x4 you can just create a ladder and prop it up on the far side. I suggest against a solid plywood sheet braced up because that prevents the mattress from breathing.


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Unless your existing room already happens to have two doors then the project that you propose is never going to get any where because the project is more than trying to build some divider wall. Trying to cut an additional doorway into the room is just not something you can freely do to a property that you happen to be renting. Additionally the ...


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Wood isn't going to harbor bedbugs. Upholstery might, but if this is your trigger I would bet dollars to donuts that this is simply autosuggestion. When I was a kid, I had my brother conditioned to the point where I just said "ants" and he'd start to itch, whether ants were possible or not... It really isn't hard to convince yourself that you might feel ...


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You'll start by connect the grounding conductor to the green screw. The black wires that are currently attached to the old switch, will attach to the black and brass colored screws on the new switch. Finally you'll have to locate a grounded "neutral" wire; or group of wires, within the box. Using a twist-on wire connector, connect a short bit of wire to the ...



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