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It's a bit hard issue to handle, because, as @isherwood indicated, that tub's destiny has been changed. I can think of two groups of 'fixes' depending on how much You are motivated: a. change of usage - bathing while standing must go, fix the shower head lower, try to use it kneeling or so, check if sutiation changes, consider using the tub as a bath tub b. ...


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I first use a mini wire brush,not too stiff bristles..you can sand some too,then vacuum all dust out.Then apply a rust coverter(i use OSPHO)this will"kill"and convert any remaining rust to "black"metal.Wait 24 hrs.then I tape off 1/2 inch outside of problem area(I use blue painters tape..much easier to remove than regular masking tape),then tape newspaper to ...


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To directly answer your question, I agree with Iggy, caulk first, then seal. My long response is going to be different however: Steps: 1) Clean excess caulk 2) Clean edges to be caulked with acetone (or if you have natural stone, methyl hydrate, or even weaker, alcohol if you have sensitive materials) 3) Allow a few moments for the cleaner to evaporate (...


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I can't be certain without checking it out in person, but I would be surprised to see a check valve in that line.


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These are all good points. I'm going to provide some comments. Your tub is made of an enamel coated steel. It's thin sheet steel so it's easy to work with, however it's not a ten second per hole job of fiber glass or acrylic. You should gauge down your bits (start with a small bit, and work to larger bits) until you hit the goal. Also, don't use ice water,...


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Well titanium bits are OK for thin sheet metal but note that the titanium is just a coating on the bit. Once the coating is worn off they are really just your run of the mill cheap steel bits. Which is the situation you have here. The only reason your drilling is prolonged is because basically your bit is toast now. You are basically just rubbing the ...


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It looks like you're starting with a pretty large bit. I like to use the smallest bit I have (don't apply too much pressure, as skinny bits break easy) and work up. You're drilling more holes overall, but each one goes a lot quicker.


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I used WD-40 but not usual stuff. Found penetrating WD-40 at home depot. Also got a plastic hair clog tool. Sprayed down pipe, let it sit for 15-20 minutes, stuck clog tool down, jiggled it around and viola...able to pull out stopper (lucky it hadn't broken off).


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The drain will unscrew... you might need a drain key (or expanding tub drain remover). Here's a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_0vYme1Q88 Or you might be able to grab it with a pair of channel locks: But if you don't care about it any more then you could use a dremel tool to cut a notch in it so that you can use a flat head screwdriver and a ...


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Use a vacuum that has a wand or a shopvac.


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One way you can fix it is by tapping in a 23mm socket into the drain. Then attach a ratchet to the socket and twist it out.



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