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You can bring sheetrock right down to the flange just like in the picture as long as you aren't going to tile over it. I would suggest using sheetrock over backer board on surfaces which you intend to paint. Backer board has a rough surface and is difficult to get a good result from painting which is why many installers just run tile right to the ceiling. ...


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I have seen many tub/showers where the tile ends a few inches above the shower spout and the last foot or two is drywall and I've never seen a problem with that. But in my bathroom renovations I use backer board and tile up to the ceiling. I feel comfortable using regular drywall on the ceiling as long as you have good ventilation.


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Ideally, drywall should be in the next room, or at least around the corner. Tile backer board (not green drywall - cement-based products in 3x5 sheets) is much better for the job. If you think you simply can't do that, stop the drywall at the top of the tub surround or shower enclosure and switch to backer board from there down. And use moisture-resistant ...


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It should (be backer-board) rest on the flange, like this picture: Picture says it all, click here if you want to read more words.


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I've always heard that there should be a small gap between the tile and the tub, and that gap should be filled with silicone caulking. I found this video really helpful for getting a perfect bead of caulk around the bathtub. It involves setting up some tape to use as a straight edge, and using a plastic spoon to smooth the caulk (instead of the normal ...


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It should be not level water should go right a way to the hole



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