Hot answers tagged

41

While caulk is fairly elastic, it handles better under compression than tension. By filling the tub all the way, you expand the gap quite a bit. Once the caulk is applied and the tub drained, the caulk compresses. During normal use, the caulk will likely never be in tension. As you'd have to add more weight than a tub full of water, before the caulk had to ...


13

You can buy bathtub splash guards such as the ones found here. You should be able to find similar ones at your local hardware store. Most versions install in seconds, using easy peel and stick adhesive backings. No tools, no mess, and usually no waiting for caulks and/or glues to dry.


13

There would be no such thing as "excessive wear" on a bathtub drain - unless there was caustic material being poured down the drain which ate away at the drain pipe and joints.....although from the sounds of it this is far from the case here. For the sake of discussion let us assume that the tub is a quality name brand product. It may be that there was ...


12

Greenboard is water resistant, but should not be used in areas that are going to stay damp, such as tub surrounds. Once water gets into it (especially if it's not sealed correctly, and there's not the requisite gap between the tub and the wallboard), it will slowly deteriorate and/or mold -- it's water resistant, not water proof. Yes, cement board is a ...


12

That's just.... nasty. The spout looks fine but the faucet is both too far out and not square. There's a large gap at the base that looks like it can leak water into the wall space. The "plumber" was either drunk, half-asleep or incompetent. There is no excuse for work that sloppy.


11

If it rinsed down the drain and hasn't clogged yet then you're in fairly good shape. Clumping litter definitely can be saturated and breaks down. I'm assuming this is some sort of clay based litter (I use a pine based product myself) with fairly small granules and not a lot of stone. Also I'm presuming that you haven't been flushing the line out with ...


10

It's called a "standing waste". It works just like you say. The cone at the base of the inner tube seals against a flange and the water must fill the outer tube (attached to your floor) before (over)flowing down the inner tube. Here's a pic since words are useless for describing this kind of thing. Here's some in-depth discussion on resolving a clog on ...


9

It sure looks like you did a beautiful job on your shower, be a crying shame to see all that hard work ruined with stained grout. The glazing agent in the grout needs 8 to 10 days to harden completely. I suggest that you tape up some poly to protect the new grout if you really need to use the shower before the prescribed cure time. A few days of ...


9

Will it be used as a shower as well? If so, sheetrock is the wrong material for the surround. It's going to act as a sponge if water ever finds its way to it. What you could do is put backer board on top of the sheetrock, then coat the backer board with a waterproof membrane (I like the Redgard product for that) then tile. Be sure that the backer overlaps ...


9

Your tub has an overflow drain. You just have to find it. Remove the two screws next to the combination drain toggle & overflow plate. Now gently pull up to reveal the overflow hole and the drain plug: Get out your snake (you've got a snake, right?) and thread it down the newly revealed hole. Also remove the single screw holding the drain screen. ...


9

I had this problem in my last house, but rather than Jaydles' fancy putty, I just grabbed a cheap tube of silicone caulk and ran a bead around the outside of the tub wall. A couple seconds to squeegee it off after the shower, and things stayed nice and dry. If you're not great at drawing straight lines, use good-quality masking tape to get those perfect ...


9

Let's look at the three pictures above. #1 - This is probably the most common install. You cement board is on the same plane as the flange. It is thicker so it ends up hanging over. Tip - If you are using cement board by itself I would strongly suggest using 1/2 inch. Also I am a strong supporter of hardibacker since it doesn't allow water through or ...


8

I remove galvanized pipe whenever possible. A brass nipple will be a much longer term connection, due to much lower reactivity to water caused corrosion. However, if the plumbing elsewhere is galvanized, it may only be a symbolic gesture.


7

Of course they can as long as you have proper drainage angle and double venting and traps. If this is an installation of a new fixture, you need a permit and a master plumber to sign for the permit. Get a plumber and do it right. Just asking the question tells me you don't know what to do and could get into trouble. Saving a few bucks and doing it wrong ...


7

Any Sheetrock, including green moisture resistant, is not intended for use in showers or any environment with repeated direct water contact. You can paint it , but the results will be the same, FAILURE ! Do not attempt to put tile on Drywall either. There are some new high tech backings or you can use good old fashion concrete board or hardi-backer for ...


7

You need to replace the diverter, which in your case is also part of the spout. This should be a relatively easy and cheap replacement. Usually the spout is held on with a set screw located in the bottom - you loosen the screen and the spout will twist/pull off. Replace it with a new spout and diverter, tighten the screw and enjoy!


7

The backer should go OVER the flange, for better water drainage. Because the backer board tends to bow out when 'lipped' over the tub flange, you should: Install the tub Install shims on the studs to 'pad out' the backer so that it just clears the tub flange and overhangs it a bit (but doesn't 'land' on the rim of the tub) but leaves a 1/4 to 3/8 inch ...


7

One more thing is to keep water in the tub when you caulk until the caulk dries. It's a pain to work this way, but flex in the floor under the tub when there's weight in it can help open up a gap in the caulk over time if it was caulked with no weight in the tub. Given that your caulk is doing a critical job it shouldn't have to do means you don't want to ...


6

Yep, use a paintable latex bathroom caulk. We always use PolySeamSeal (now owned by LockTite, available at Lowe's).


6

With one of these: Enamel Repair Kit You simply sand out any rust in the chipped enamel, then paint on a new enamel coating. The finished repair should be permanent, and if well-done nearly undetectable.


6

I'm not familiar with the second approach but, as you say, it would address the root issue of the tray flexing when in use and should prevent the problem recurring. It also does seem to be rather radical. The main drawback I can see is that you are causing more "damage" to the tray and therefore increasing the risk of the repair failing. I'd ask the ...


6

Background: All new valves sold in the USA must meet a Federal anti-scald standard meant to prevent sudden surges of hot water. A typical inexpensive 'cycling' anti-scald cartridge works on pressure only, and does not sense temperature. For example you're showering and the sprinklers go off, the cold water pressure drops, and the valve will reduce the hot ...


6

The installation instructions you linked specifically say to "Apply a generous bead of polystyrene compatible adhesive" on the back wall studs first, then on the side panels. These installation instructions are the authoritative guide for how this product should be installed, so yes they should have been glued. Hopefully it's not too late to unscrew, add ...


6

4-1/4" and some larger wall tiles have bumps cast in that act as spacers. Unless you want a larger gap, no additional spacers are needed. Whether your particular tile has them is uncertain. They're often necessary to prevent sagging with heavier tile while the mortar or mastic sets.


5

Yes, they will both be using the same drain pipe at somepoint inside or outside of your house. But the the pipes must join well below the level of both items or the pipe must be large enough for the combined flow, otherwise when you put water down one of them, it will flow out of the other!


5

Were the previous owners kind enough to leave the instruction manual for the tub? If not, you may be able to look up the model online, and get a copy. The last jetted tub I had experience with, had removable jets, which could be placed in the dishwasher (as per the instruction manual). In order to clean out the tubing, we would fill the tub, and add 1-1.5 ...


5

It looks like you might be able to do this pretty easily. To remove the stopper, simply unscrew the top of the handle of the drain stopper, then unscrew the underlying screw in the shaft to pull out the drain cover completely. Then, you'll have the cradle-thing that holds the stopper. You might be able to leave that in place (I grew up in a house that had ...


5

The most common discrepancies in price between tubs, not counting accessories like heaters and jets, are due to four factors: style, depth, build quality and brand. A garden tub will generally cost you more than a simple rectangular built in, and a clawfoot is more expensive still, followed by "custom" installations like non-overflow tubs. In the same ...


5

The second contractor is correct in that the root cause needs to be addressed. The root cause is either that the tub was never supported in the first place, or that the supports were made of wood and rotted out due to moisture under the tub. In addition to what Chris said, price a new fiberglass tub versus the repair. Removing the old tub might prove to be ...


5

Fiberglass Pros: Cheap Light Easy to install Many shapes and colors Cons: Least durable Easily scratched Prone to fading. Acrylic Pros: Cheap High gloss finish that lasts Good insulator, keeps water warm Easy to clean Durable Scratches can be repaired Many shapes and colors Cons: Susceptible to scrathes Porcelain on Steel Pros: ...



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