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1

Given multiple issues there, I think the correct and possibly simplest, albeit messy, solutiion is going to be cutting the floor open and putting the pipes where you need them. Concrete is not forever.


2

I had 30 mirror tiles to remove on a wall up a stairwell. Tried a hammer and it bounced off. Had to give it a real hard blow before I could break a tile and then it shattered into 1000's of bits. Next I tried scoring the tile with a glass cutter then prying behind it with a strong putty-like lnife (blade 4 inches long and about 1 inch wide)until it broke on ...


2

Yes, the tile joints do let water pass. The grout is porous, and additionally does not seal tight with the tiles as it ages (causing it to actually pull some water in via capillary action). Many tile materials are not waterproof either. Bathroom tiling is only "waterproof" in the sense that it is a finish material that will not be damaged by water. It does ...


4

Your external list is pretty good, what's missing is an internal list: water shut off valves(stem leaks) Connections between stop valves and mixing valve Stem leaks on mixing valve Shower arm and tub outlet extension: leaks at elbow inside wall It is unusual for these sources to end up on the floor, outside the tub, unless your bath is over a slab. ...


3

Just resealing everything is a bad idea because you might, for example, just trap the leaking water somewhere you can't see it. The water will still leak and cause damage or mold. You really need to find out where the water is coming from. Turn on the shower and sit outside of it to find the leak.


1

I had the exact same problem under my bathroom sink. Here's a picture of how I resolved it. The first elbow off the sink is 1.5" because I couldn't find a 1.25" female-to-female elbow in my local Home Depot. I used a 1.25" sized compression washer in the larger elbow to get the smaller 1.25" elbow to fit snugly. Works great! You should be able to do the same ...


0

Taller bathroom vanities are typically advertised as "comfort height". My 5'6" wife strongly agrees that the 36" counters are far more comfortable. Few people complain about kitchen counters being too tall, so I don't know why there's so much concern that they'll be unusable in bathrooms. For small children.. they're not going to be small forever. Get a ...


1

That looks like fiberglass (if it feels pretty flexible its fiberglass, if it pings when you tap it with your wedding ring its porcelain) which could in theory be patched with a fiberglass resin patch. Use the kind with the fiberglass mesh, not just Bondo it will crack. Or you could try West Systems G/Flex Epoxy Kit WSY-650K, I've used it to do some hairy ...


0

Yes there is a rapid set thinset, big box stores have it. Fortified thinset that you have is good stuff, I used it in all my install for my bath renovations. 2 days time is not enough time for thinset to get a strong bond, enough to step on but easy to pull, any longer you would have had a tougher time. The amount of thinset you use is crucial, it has to be ...


1

There isn't anything wrong with grouting between tub and tile given that you do it right. I fill up tub full of water (weight) and grout. I feel grout is just easier to deal with. My grout has lasted 6-7 years now in one bathroom without any sort of cracking or separation. If there was separation I would caulk it. It does get mildew and mold and I ...


2

This is really impossible to answer without opening it up more. But basically it depends on the damage already done. What you really need to do is clean this shower (bleach) and take out any loose pieces. And let it sit for a week. Also try to keep the humidity in the room low too. If nothing grows back and your tiles are structurally bonding you can ...


2

Expanding foam such as Great Stuff would work fine.


1

Silicone caulk would probably work the best with moisture and temp changes. You need to figure out how to push it up on the back side.



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