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1/4 [I can only include 2 photos with each post, and I have 8, so this is 1 of 4 posts.] The photos posted above were really helpful, since many people may not know what connectors and adapters are available -- as I didn't before replacing two vanities. Therefore, I thought I'd post photos of what I did and the components I used. The first thing to do is ...


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2/4 There are two types of J-traps: one with a threaded slip-joint fitting on each end and a "repair" J-trap, with a slip-joint on the longer leg and a compression flange on the other. Use whichever one is suitable for your existing piping.


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3/4 The connectors you use depend on two factors: how far is the tailpiece horizontally from the drain connection, and how far above or below it? In the above situation, the drain connection is several inches to the side of the tailpiece and slightly below it. To close up horizontal distance, you can use another wall tube cut to the appropriate length, ...


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4/4 My other vanity has greater horizontal distance and less vertical. Therefore, I connected the longer leg of the J-trap to the wall tube, to get more displacement down, so the connectors would have room to cover the horizontal distance on the way back up. In this case, the 90-degree elbow didn't quite make it to the bottom of the tailpiece, so I had to ...


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To directly answer your question, I agree with Iggy, caulk first, then seal. My long response is going to be different however: Steps: 1) Clean excess caulk 2) Clean edges to be caulked with acetone (or if you have natural stone, methyl hydrate, or even weaker, alcohol if you have sensitive materials) 3) Allow a few moments for the cleaner to evaporate (...


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Just a thought, I worked in an office with an internal bathroom, i.e. no exterior walls and we noticed a off smell there as well. The toilets and sinks worked fine, it wasn't until we realized the floor drain was the source. There was a P trap on the floor drain and the water had evaporated in the trap, allowing air to escape into the room. You might want ...


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To me it sounds like the vent from the bathroom to the outside must have moisture in it and growing something. I say this because many HVAC systems have a small percentage of fresh air added when they are running and this keeps the air moving out of the bathroom. When the System is off the smell wafts back into the room. You may be able to use a spray ...


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Unfortunately, silicone doesn't stick to silicone. So unless you can somehow bridge the entire bead of original caulk, you're stuck with the hard work of taking it all out again.


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Your options: 1) Add perimeter baseboard hot water heat units. Just re-route the existing master bath feed to these baseboard units. 2) Add perimeter electric units. This would be more expensive in the long run as electricity is more expensive than gas. Plus the installation would require added wiring. You could also opt for under tile electric heat. 3) ...


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One purpose for the vent is to remove lingering odors. Venting high has to do with peoples noses and, once upon a time, truly noxious gas; restrooms today are not as toxic as they once were. Still, if the gases are vented downward, they are less likely to be further evacuated from the area because there is less wind on the ground than in the sky, especially ...


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I was researching exactly the same thing and came across a few products that does not require you to scrape the paint off. EcoBond - you paint the surface and it will reactive with lead.


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Wayfaring Stranger has the right of it. Citric acid is far better at dissolving the calcium-magnesium-soap scum mix than vinegar. Here in Dallas we have the worst limescale/soap scum buildup I've experienced. Having tried CLR, vinegar, and several other remedies, I was not prepared for how effective, easy, and odorless citric acid could be. My suggestion ...


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It is possible there is an "inline duct fan" half way along the duct. These are "designed to produce higher working pressures for applications that require high air flows, with low relative noise." compared to cheaper surface-mounted fans. Your duct presumably runs through your attic/loft and is accessible from there. There will probably be an ...


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It may be a passive ventilation system (which are more commonly found in apartments). You should follow the duct and see where it goes. I only say that because, well, it may just be a shoddy job, or it may be going to an HVAC sytem or something crazy. This is an unusual thing. You should have a vent and the vent should go outside. For best results the vent ...


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remove about 1/8".. should be fine


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Just had this same problem with irrigation in front yard. I can't think of its generic name but it's also called a nipple extractor. You can get a set at Lowes or Home Depot for 20-30. See YouTube video and how to do it: http://youtu.be/8Wns8rs1mVc


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OK for me this happened when replacing a cartridge on a moen kitchen sink faucet -- gushing water! Turns out that the instructions list the "alignment angle" as having one large hole at the top, and the two smaller holes at the bottom. But on my faucet it was the large hole at about 5 o'clock so I inserted it to match and voila, no leaks. That was scary ...


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The bottom edge of the backer should terminate above the upper most edge of the pan. The tile should come further down over the rim and occlude the rim flange and terminate about 1/4" above the pan shoulder. That 1/4" gap should be caulked with waterproof caulking.



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