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dotty do you have the marble counter-top already? this is going to be your main expense? Don't know if this is appropriate not but I'm a DIY enthusiast myself and am always looking for the best deals. I have access to a 6 ft white marble counter top with 2 sink cut outs already in it. i believe it has the back splash and everything. It was offered to me ...


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The Swedish company Ikea is know for a variety of knock-down type furniture at very reasonable prices. From experience I've concluded that their prices are a direct reflection of the material used. If the vanity you're considering is mostly pressed board and not 3/4 inches thick the odds are not in it lasting awhile. You should be able to find a large ...


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The purpose of a bathroom exhaust fan or bathroom window is to vent humid air outdoors. When I bought my house, it did not have a bathroom fan. I had grown up in a house with a bathroom fan, and thought perhaps it wasn't necessary to vent the moisture, after all, since it didn't make sense to me to open the window in the winter. I was wrong. After a year ...


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Why do you use a bathroom vent fan? To remove moisture. Why remove moisture? Moisture penetrates latex paint and sheetrock. Ceiling sheetrock will retain so much moisture, you can see the paper backing is damp. As I found out much to my chagrin way back when I had to open up the wall on a bathroom that had a long failed power vent (black mold). Needless to ...


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You will all be happy to hear that I've recently run the hose to an exterior vent.


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I recently installed a vent fan in a bathroom that my kids use. I hooked it up to the electrical line used for the lights in the bathroom so that the fan would go on when someone turned on the lights. I was able to cut out a 4" hole in the roof right above the bathroom for the vent hose and installed a vent cap on the roof. It is best to vent to a location ...


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If you live in an area covered by International Residential Code; or similar building codes, it's required that the fan exhaust to the outdoors. See this answer, for exact code verbiage.


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IMO, and IME, bathroom fans should always be vented outside. Bathrooms are one of the biggest (if not the biggest) producer or water vapor in your home. When water vapor is trapped is can cause things like mold, mildew, damage to furniture, added difficulty in conditioning the air, and many more. Just because a bathroom vent is not currently vented to the ...


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To re-secure ceramic tiles it is best to consider what environment it will be subject to. If, for example, I am re-attaching a loose wall tile in a shower stall I wouldn't use a "mastic" type adhesive. I've seen repairs fail when mastic gets wet. For shower stalls with a solid backing go with any fortified thin set mix. Some people have claimed construction ...


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Before using any adhesive to secure a shower curtain rod, I think you'd have more success keeping it in place with an expanding or screw- type rod. It's the same idea as the chin-up bars that mount in a doorway. The rubber stops at each end of the rod prevent mars and wall damage. I've seen them turned so tight the tile cracked! But if you still need some ...


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Look on line for information, that your city should give you, about remodeling/permits. You should be able to apply for a Home Owners Permit, that should save you some money. But be ready to give them drawings of what you did. As for the Inspection, be ready to rip the sheetrock and any tile off the walls and back to the studs. A city inspector will not ...


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If you go to apply for a permit for work you already did, you might get one of any number of reactions, ranging from, "just pay us our fee and go away" to "an inspector will be out next Thursday to make sure everything visible looks fine (and just pay us our fee)" to "you need to rip out all the finish materials so our inspector can look at the plumbing and ...


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You also need to be sure your water pressure is adequate (as in high psi). A wall mounted toilet doesn't use a reservoir, but relies on high water pressure for complete flushes.


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Just make sure the cement board is out from the outer part of the tub. It being uneven underneath is not consequential. You just need your cement board to be able to lay flat and I usually place mine about 1/8" from tub.


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The best answer is to reapply when they need it, but if you're nervous you could pull it up and apply every year or two. In a perfect world, it would last much longer than that. I'd use a putty knife to scrape up that existing silicone so that the new bead gets a nice clean seal. You don't want to just keep adding more silicone on top of what's already ...


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Actually, all I had to do was to pull gently. I was worried I would need to do something more complicated and I would crack it forcing it in a way it was not supposed to twist or open, but all I needed was to pull. There were some wires that held the plastic lamp fixture to the ceiling, but I could separate it enough to get the lightbulbs. I don't know ...


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Your best approach may be to think about how someone would have installed it in the first place. There must be some way to get to a fastener or hooks or latches to get it off the ceiling. Use a flashlight and a wide-blade screwdriver to very gently see which portions of the cover (if any) flex away from the ceiling and which are tightly held to the ...


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Reach up and tap the opaque lens cover. If it seems like it's not integrated into the rest of the housing, then you should be able to move it out of the way. If it looks like it's one piece, then try lightly tugging on the whole thing, see if there's a spring loaded catch or retaining spring.


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If your renting, your only concern, I would think, is the smell. If there is a smell it will disappear as soon as the water dries up. When I fixed my mothers house the smell was supposedly there for years. It was caused by a slowly leaking toilet. When it was fixed, it took some weeks for the floor to completely dry, and the smell went away. You may have ...


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Leaving this as an answer with trepidation and the hope that a real tile expert will chime in. My guess is that they're limestone or travertine. If you have spares, grind/smash/pulverize them to dust, mix that with a 2 part epoxy and fill 'er up. (Same for the broken chips at the door -- glue them solidly down with granite-safe adhesive and fill the cracks ...


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EDIT: I let the photo lull me into a sense that the OP had more access to the joists than what is actually accessible. I did indicate what I think the answer is, in the final sentence of my final answer as an option... You obviously can't leave plywood cantilevered out in space like that, and there's no way to butt one piece of plywood up against another ...


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Changing the pitch would do little. It sounds like it may not be vented correctly.


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If you have a specific tile in mind, and you have seen this in a store, simply try the slipperyness out by making it wet and rubbing on it. There should be nothing wrong with using a pool tile for a bathroom (except maybe slipperyness), since a bathroom is made waterproof underneath the tiles. If the membrane is intact, you can use any tile meant for wet ...


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To go along with gregmac's very good answer I would offer the follow tips. Make sure your rigid duct is ultra secure, especially near the fan. If it wiggles when you grab it then it will make sounds with the fan going. I strap these things in really tight. I rockwool the first 3-4 feet really tight. I smash it in around the duct. This absorbs much of ...


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There more restricted the airflow is, the more noise there will be. All contributing factors to noise: Diameter of duct (larger is better) Overall length (shorter is better) Number of turns/bends (fewer is better) Radius of turns (larger is better) Size reducers used (no reducers is better) Type of duct (smooth, rigid is better than flexible) Type of ...



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