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3

You should be able to find a P-trap assembly available at any local hardware store. The horizontal section should attach directly to the drain line coming out of the wall, while the vertical end should accept the tail piece from the sink.


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Entirely normal. Among other things, the tank cover extends a bit past the tank so space has to be left for that. I'd be much more surprised if there wasn't a space there.


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Sink needs to be above the drain and the trap need to fit between to sink and drain. Since the trap keeps sewer gases from entering your house through to drain, they are very important.


2

Sliding contact, bathroom, expect failure. Using a ribbon cable in the manner of a cable carrier (should not actually need a cable carrier, though if you wanted to go there you could get a small one) would be far more reliable. Fixed contacts, cable moves. Seen on many inkejet printer printheads (the "doing it with a ribbon cable method", that is.) The real ...


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I always plan my bathroom around the first row of tiles above the tub. Everything else plays off of that. These are the tiles that will be most noticeable and most susceptible to issues. I will always put whole piece vertically speaking in this first row. From there I work my way up, out, and out and down. If I notice that I am going to have a sliver at ...


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I don't think this is an issue. You aren't blending the water into the mix. You are basically introducing the water to the outer skin of the thinset. Yes some may get into the "inners" but I believe this would be a minute amount and I personally would be cautious but not worry too much. I might delay grouting for a few days and thoroughly test the tiles ...


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I have tiled my own floors, ran base, wood and tile in one room or another. I have also flushed toilets and had them overflow. The construction of wood framed homes inherently allows for water which naturally seeks the lowest point will find the gaps at the plate line to the underlayment, (and tile!!) all around the perimeter of any bath. To me that has a ...


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I keep seeing your question has not been answered. I do not build in the type of climate you describe but here are my thoughts: Do not trap moisture within the wall/ceiling structure- so one side only. Keep moisture from entering - barrier on room side of wall only. Around here I have had inspectors insist on removing moisture board on ceilings - they have ...


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You can find a lot of valuable information on tiling information at The Floor Elf He has a summary on grout vs. caulk. The term he uses is "changes in plain" and makes good arguments for using caulk. Since you will be putting down baseboard it wont really be seen so finding a perfect match in color is not an issue. Here is a summary from the article at: ...


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If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


2

If it isn't too difficult, dry lay the length and width of the room with spacers to understand your best focal point. Usually the first full tile starts at the threshold, which customarily for a bathroom is marble. Ideally, as you are planning on using the same tile vertically as well as on the floor, you can compromise on the spacing and use a ⅜" grout ...


1

It's all aesthetics. Common strategy is to lay it out so that cut tiles and uneven lines are situated in less notable places that do not naturally catch the eye. An example would be to use cut tiles on both sides of a wall or floor to avoid a line of narrow-cut tiles, which looks bad.


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Clarity in description would help. With a floor that is not enclosed by parallel walls, the usual approach is to center the tiles (start from a chalk line in the center of the floor) so that there's a cut-tile on either side of the floor, and cut to fit the walls as they are. How that works out in reality is dependent on the size of both the tiles and the ...


2

I think what you're saying is that the walls and the tub are not perpendicular and that you are going to tile the wall. You want to know whether you should match a wall or the tub. In situations like this my recommendation is usually to tile in a diamond pattern or to use smaller or subway or mosaic tiles such that long, contiguous grout lines are not ...


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I would say it is too late to add these. Another alternative is to use a shower caddy. They are fairly common, and can hold soaps, shampoos, etc. If you really wanted to go this route, you may end up having to re-tile the entire shower.


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Of course you should. Then be sure you have or put you in a fart fan to remove the moisture and humidity from the restroom. Make sure the fart fan is vented thru the roof and not into your attic or soffit vents.


1

There are some pretty good imitation stained glass window overlays, which I think would overcome your "looks cheap" concern while being fairly cheap (under $30, if I remember correctly). (I used a frosted overlay for the lower glass, only, of my downstairs bathroom since without a ladder nobody's going to be able to get line of sight above that line to any ...


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I would say that the dimmer is going bad. You may have too many lights on the one dimmer, do I understand that you have a fan on it too?


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I suggest you lay down plywood over the planks with subfloor glue and decking screws. After that I would use a thin layer of thinset under the hardiboard (per its installation instructions) and also screw it using the hardi-screws. Install the backer tape as you tile


1

The installation manual for HardieBacker suggests to embed it in thin-set and it should be installed over plywood. Thus I would suggest removing the current wood planks flooring, install a 3/4" outdoor grade plywood, thinset and then your HardieBacker (screwed down). All of this is to prevent as much movement in your substrate and avoid cracks in your ...


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The only time I have ever heard of an inspector even talking about a bathroom floor is if there is another dwelling below you (basement apartment being rented out). There are no codes or laws for a normal one family dwelling. I am sure certain towns may have something for apartment buildings and such but the answer is no. Should you use one? Seriously ...


0

I normally would use 1/2" HB for this. However there is a lot that goes into making flooring calculations so you might be OK with 1/4" (but I would go with 1/2"). You will just screw the HB into the planks with backer screws. Try not (don't) screw into the joists below the planks. This should be pretty easy since you have 1/4" view holes in between each. ...


1

I have done several tile floors by just screwing the hardie board down and then laying thinset and tile right on top. I only just heard recently that some people recommend that you should lay down thinset under your hardie board. Since you are putting down hardie board on boards with small gaps, I would not recommend trying to put down thinset under it. It ...


1

My first thought was venting as well. The washer and tub may have different vents and have no bearing. I'm assuming, of course, that you tried the simple approaches, like pulling out the drain stop to ensure it isn't clogged with hair and gunk, and dropping the trap to ensure it is clean? I had an issue like this with a tub drain where the vent was ...


0

1 white which is hot, and 2 greys which are hot...the switch is on 2 seperate breakers. This means that: new switch it only has 1 common hook up, then 3 other connectors on the otherside. The new switch will NOT work here. You cannot feed from "2 separate breakers" to "1 common hookup" - you need a different switch that more closely matches the ...


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I'd suggest either using an anchor as suggested above, or possibly buying a rack that you can screw right into any studs, which clearly you'd have to find.


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http://www.pfisterfaucets.com/Bath/Product/R90-TD2K.aspx Found this puppy at Home Depot. It's a universal kit, like the Danco, but it's actually high quality. Did the job and looks great. Cost me $99. Also, I was saying my valve was a "Moentrol" based on the Danco trim instructions. Turns out, it was actually not a moentrol. It's a "moen standard" which ...


0

Moentrol is the type of valve, the single knob that pulls out and pushes in for flow control and rotates right and left for temperature control. There were numerous trim styles offered with that valve type, so just saying "Moentrol" does not adequately describe your needs. Some of the old trim plates were marked with the word Moentrol, but many were not. If ...


-1

"... the switch it self was working because when in on position there was no voltage reading across the terminals"; In ON there should be current across the switch; "... when off i got standard 120 reading from the common hot to the heater terminal"; you should not get current in OFF. You cannot measure AC current "from the common hot to the heater ...


1

It may be unsafe to run the heater without a working fan. Drop ALL the power to the room and remove the guts from the assembly. Usually the fan will have a short cord with a plug. Power it up and try to get it to spin (don't get shocked or bitten). If it is fail you might be able to get a replacement from the manufacturer. IME this is hit or miss; ...


0

I'm putting down reclaimed pine in my house (1926 bungalow) and will include the wood floor in the kid's 10'x14' bath. I too, am going for a vintage/distressed look and I like the look of a white clawfoot tub and pedestal sink against the warmer wood tones. Overflowing toilet seems to be the only potential drawback, but what the heck...


0

The fan should have a damper, as should the vent. If you insulate the pipe in between, that should go a long way in helping things. It won't be air tight, of course. It is a hole in your ceiling, after all. But it should help. Keep in mind that you're sucking way more heat out when the fan is on than is likely escaping the entire rest of the day. With ...



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