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remove about 1/8".. should be fine


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Just had this same problem with irrigation in front yard. I can't think of its generic name but it's also called a nipple extractor. You can get a set at Lowes or Home Depot for 20-30. See YouTube video and how to do it: http://youtu.be/8Wns8rs1mVc


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OK for me this happened when replacing a cartridge on a moen kitchen sink faucet -- gushing water! Turns out that the instructions list the "alignment angle" as having one large hole at the top, and the two smaller holes at the bottom. But on my faucet it was the large hole at about 5 o'clock so I inserted it to match and voila, no leaks. That was scary ...


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The bottom edge of the backer should terminate above the upper most edge of the pan. The tile should come further down over the rim and occlude the rim flange and terminate about 1/4" above the pan shoulder. That 1/4" gap should be caulked with waterproof caulking.


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Will the bath keep draining? It sounds like the pipe below the toilet,sink & tub are plugged. The other bathrooms are probably closer to the tank / city sewer so they work fine. A snake would probably clear the drain. I would go in at the sink trap as these are easy to remove unless there is a clean out close by.


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Your question-asking and diagram are great! Unfortunately, i can't fully conceptualize it right now (too hungry), but I hope this post gives you helpful info re: wall height. Here's a pic of my parents' shower stall, which we designed together: I hate curtains and convinced them an "open concept" shower would be cool. They planned for a full-height glass ...


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Based on your diagram, it appears as though it should be wired like this... Notice that the white wire to the switch, has been marked with black tape/marker at both ends. This signifies that it's being used as an ungrounded (hot) conductor. When hooking up the GFCI, make sure you use the LINE terminals. If you use the LOAD terminals, the device will ...


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When wiring with cable, and the feed is coming to the light, the standard is to feed a single pole with the white wire (the code requires this) and return with the black wire. If you connect the white wire to the other white wires at the light fixture you create a dead short when the switch is closed this would trip the GFCI if you are downstream from it. ...


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The only real answer can be "as long as it takes". There are so many variables that affect how easily the water will evaporate that you can't predict. Could be hours in some situations, could be months in others. You need to figure out how to measure how much water is left. You might consider buying a moisture content meter; there are ones with pins that ...


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I'm not sure if there's a moisture barrier specifically that goes in between the paint and the wall of the bathroom, but there are paints that are made to withstand high humidity. Also, semi-gloss seems to be the finish of choice because it is better at resisting stains and moisture which are common problems for bathrooms.


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Were this my project I'd cut off the fitting flush with the floor and find out exactly how close to normally the flange fits. The inside of elbow should be the same size as the inside of the pipe. If possible, I'd make slight adjustments to the flange by sanding or grinding, then glue it in using primer and PVC adhesive. I'd then be sure to securely anchor ...


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There's no such thing as too many wires between the bathroom switch and the bathroom light/fan/heatlamp/whatever the future may bring. I would run at least 3 hots and a neutral, with 1 hot and 1 neutral being 12ga for a high current device. Even better, install conduit and pull whatever as needed. I personally hate fans which turn on with the light. I ...


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I own a remodeling firm, and this is one of those things that so many get wrong and the manufacturers don't tell you how to get right. There are 3 aspects homeowners never hear: 1. All the old caulk HAS to come off. Squeaky clean. 2. All surfaces and substrates to be caulked need to be dry. Bone dry. 3. Use silicone if you must, but silicone or ...


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Some are. You can also get transformers designed to mount into a 1/2” knockout in a junction box. The transformer proper sits outside the box. You can also find transformers which sit on the outside of a metal box cover. These are very common in 24VAC. These are typically true transformers. You may be using the word "transformer" loosely to mean ...


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Yick, we had something similar but worse. I: Cut out whatever subfloor was gone. The joists were stained and powdery looking in spots, so to prevent any mold colonies I painted those up to the edges of the remaining subfloor material with Kilz. When that was dry, I screwed in pieces of matching plywood to replace the gaps, noting that I made sure to have ...


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It's cheaper for a company to use in-house "off-the-shelf" parts instead of having multiple, specifically tooled assembly lines for each and every model of faucet. The "internal parts" are all likely to be the same. The extra manufacturing cost (we have to ignore whatever marketing says, and the effect of supply and demand*) comes from the fact that plastic ...


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The guy who plumbed this probably goes out for beer with the guy who plumbed our double-wide. :) I learned the hard way, by repairing previous work here, that you can't have too many vents. Where to put them though? Your drop from the tub to the P doesn't have a lot of space. I can also appreciate not running horizontal below the "flood level." So, I'd ...


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Potted plants inside the house with soil that is not allowed to dry can be a source of small flies. Take all your houseplants outside and let them sit where they get some sun for a day or two, to dry out. I have seen nasty maggots and flies in old sewer drains that are plugged or partially plugged, or that are left unused for long periods. Check all your ...



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