New answers tagged

1

The proper installation order: vapor barrier, backer-board, tile. Secondly, since this isn't a drywall/wood wall, the backer-board would protrude the tiles off the wall about 1/2 an inch, this is easily fixed at the top where there is a tile moulding but was wondering if there were any other elegant solutions? I'm not sure that I understand this problem, ...


2

In my experience the normal, common way to attach such a top also fills any gaps, since it's good old silicone caulking - White or brown would seem like a good choice here. You can also attach by other means if you like and then caulk to seal and conceal. And you certainly should shim (or sand/grind the high spots on the base) to get it level. If the gap is ...


1

Shims are your friend :-) . Since what you really want is for the countertop to be perfectly level, get some shims (and a good bubble level) and adjust the shim positions until the top is level. Then glue or clamp or whatever you're planning. If you then have a cosmetic problem, i.e. the shims or some gaps visible, you'll need to get some luaun or other ...


1

To me it sounds like you removed the back draft damper that may have gotten stuck.


-1

Perhaps I don't understand your meaning. Click, one type of vinyl flooring, doesn't use grout. It is waterproof.


1

Obviously this fix won't apply in all cases, but it's something to check for. Searched around for some answers, and noticed some advice about the exhaust duct being too small. With the fan out, I felt for the duct to see how big it was, and a piece of rubber came out, around the same size as the duct. Possibly something cut out for the duct 45 years ago ...


0

Yes, a shower base should be sufficiently water tight to contain an inch or so of water above the drain. I know that mine does. Yours doesn't appear to have a lip to contain the water, so that door needs a gasket to both contain the water and prevent damage to the door mechanism. It sure looks like your builder forgot a seal or chunk of rubber gasket. If ...


1

While the advice in other answers appears correct, it is critical to connect the "line" and "load" wires correctly to the GFCI. Here's a picture from a help page You can ignore the GFCI on the left.


1

You need to ground your switches -- Code requires it. And yes, standard single pole switches work here. Also -- depending on where the fixtures are located, you may wish to put one or more of them on the load side of the GFCI. Make sure that the existing black and white wires on your diagram go to the LINE terminals on the GFCI outlet!


0

That looks correct. Your ground(bare) and neutral(white) will all be nutted together. Then the black and red wires (hot) will attach to the switches (all appear to be single pole since none are in a series) The only thing I would suggest is making sure you ground the switches. Sometimes code will demand it, but it's also a good idea since it's a wet ...


2

It's really up to you; there are pros and cons to either choice. Piecing in would be easier and quicker, but then you'd have a butt joint all around the shower to feather out. Tearing the rest of the drywall into the corners would look nicer (no butt joints), but would be plenty more work.


1

The size sounds large enough for a shower. Have you thought about a ceiling mounted shower? The shower coming straight down there may be less splashing compared to a wall mounted shower. I usually install 2" shower drains but have installed 1-1/2". I find the size of the drain opening like a larger 4" square grate compared to a standard 2" round makes the ...


3

Your friend is out of his league here A GFCI outlet has two sets of terminals on it -- LINE terminals for the power IN as well as LOAD terminals that connect to the GFCI's protected hot and neutral in addition to that protected hot and neutral being provided to the GFCI's face receptacles. Hardwired applications can use what's called a "faceless" GFCI ...


3

To save $ we daisy chain outlets, 1 GCI outlet can cover others. If the first outlet in a string is protected and correctly wired,. All the outlets on the load side are just as safe, and will trip. With a cheap outlet tester with the GFCI test function you can test this out!! This is a case where you now know more than ha does!!!


2

As a contractor, I have been using Kerdi since it came out. I always install it over cement board or backerboard, never over drywall, even blueboard or the mold resistant greenboard. Redgard is a similar product. If done according to manufacturers instructions, it will seal nicely. Important to overlap seams in a shingle method. I've never had a failure....


-1

I actually found out that I can actually just use glass shelf brackets.


0

You could put enamel right back down again. One common brand of alkyd enamel paint is Rustoleum, commonly referred to as an "oil paint". You'd want to keep it dry days before and after the repair. For a more durble repair, use a 2-part epoxy paint. Those paint systems have a fairly high entry cost, so I wouldn't do it for that job alone. But if you ...


2

3 possibilities that I can see. Tape every square inch of it and just start smashing. Wear serious eye protection and a face shield, gauntlet gloves, heavy clothing, head covering, ... in short, don't have any exposed skin. Tape, protect yourself (as above), and try to get a pry bar under the edges. You'll need to do a bit of drywall repair, but you might ...


2

Depending on the direction of the joists, it will only take 1 sheet, the T&G will have no value, unless the floor you pulled up was T&G as well, then it will only help on one edge. If the T&G was cheaper than square edge, then I would use it. I have seen it cheaper in a big box store, although I could not figure out why it was. It was not on ...


0

There are advantages to using t&g. In terms of substrate requirements, it doesn't matter. A 5/8th sheet of t&g will support the floor just as well as a 5/8th sheet of standard. For your considerations, with standard you'll have to space them with a 1/8th gap between sheets for expansion/contraction, this isn't a problem with t&g, they can be ...


0

A cheap plastic Zip-it drain opener works well for me.


1

https://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm 608.7 Thresholds. Thresholds in roll-in type shower compartments shall be 1/2 inch (13 mm) high maximum in accordance with 303. In transfer type shower compartments, thresholds 1/2 inch (13 mm) high maximum shall be beveled, rounded, or vertical. Ramps(in general) are permitted to be 1:...


1

The U bend or "P" trap below the sink may be plugged with hair and soap scum causing it to back up. when you flush the toilet the gurgling could be caused from the slight vacuum the water running down the pipe when you flush. The drain stopper in the sink is usually a place hair and soap get stuck also. Place a bucket under the pipe and dissemble the trap. ...


2

There is no reason to be demoing this more than a day before it needs to be done. Demoing the ceiling is a 1 hour job. If they plan on running new electric and you will be demoing it is normal to cut out parts of the ceiling to make your runs - even big parts. We would simply screw the drywall back in where we cut it out with 4-5 screws - doesn't need to ...


1

Why not simply mount conventional wet location cans on the angled joists? Use wide angle floods or even non-reflector bulbs. While the angled mount will create an off-angle bright spot, the face diffusers will mitigate that, and you could use two or three lower wattage units to spread out the coverage.


1

I don't think you will find much of a selection. The 2014 NEC section 410.10.D states the fixture would need to be 8' above the shower threshold. on top of this if you had the height the fixture must be listed for a wet location. With this tight of a restriction most MFG's wont make a specialty fixture because of limited sales.


4

No, no, no! It's polarized for a reason. Just replace the receptacle with a polarized receptacle. Make sure the taller slot is on the neutral side. They look like this, note the absence of a ground pin. There may be a green screw on the outlet nonetheless, that grounds the outlet. It should be left disconnected unless ground is actually present in ...


0

You'll need to patch the areas, where the paper tore off, and then skim coat the entire wall, so that the patched areas, don't stand out "shinier and flatter", than the rest of the wall. At this point, Google is your friend, especially if you plan to fix it yourself. You may also be able to get a contractor, to do the whole thing, for a fairly cheap price. ...


2

The best hack is one that has already been specifically engineered: They make remote buttons for them, the pictured style is one of several options. Go to a good commercial plumbing shop and you should be able to get more info.


4

The nice thing about children is that they will grow larger and this problem will eliminate itself (although this will then be the least of your worries). So, you only need a temporary fix. I am envisioning a piece of clear plastic tubing with an internal diameter close to the size of the handle. (A hose clamp could be used, if absolutely needed, to keep it ...


0

My guess is that the flies came inside on some fruit or veggie. They came in as little larvae and then hatched as adult flies. They did not all hatch at the same time, so after you killed the adults, some more hatched. You are seeing them on the light bulb because flies like light. Probably the problem wll go away as quickly as it started. But flies can ...


1

Purchase a towel bar to your liking that has the bar as a separate piece, longer than the spacing you need. Cut the bar to the length you need and install. I have had to cut the bar on occasion when the space was too small for the bar on the wall, so I made it shorter.The same idea should work for you.


0

Out of curiosity, why are any of you suggesting backerboard at all? that's home depot homeowner installation method. Any competent tile contractor would float the wall in mortar giving you a stronger, level, perfectly flat, and square surface to properly install tile. If your going to do the job do it right, and give professional advice pls. The Kerdi/...


0

The bearing and fan should align and run in the same position irrespective of how the fan is mounted. It will align in the opposite direction to which the air is being pushed. The air is being forced out, the fan is being forced in. Newtons 3rd law.



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