New answers tagged

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Assuming that you can't fix this without removing and replacing the subfloor (I can't think of anyway to "do it right" without doing so but I'm not all knowing in that area). To cut out the subfloor, you can use your circular saw for all but the corners. Since you know the thickness of the floor, just set your blade such that it's depth is exactly the same ...


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You need a fixture listed for wet locations: from the NEC. Bathtub and shower areas. Luminaries located within the actual outside dimension of the bathtub or shower to a height of 8' vertically from the top of the bathtub or threshold of the shower shall be marked for damp locations or for wet locations were subject to shower spray. NEC 410.10.D. Since in a ...


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From the 2014 NEC: 210.8 (A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in 210.8(A)(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel. (1) Bathrooms There is no requirement in the code for bathroom lights or exhaust fans to be GFCI protected. ...


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International Mechanical Code dies not allow this. It must be direct vented, typically through the soffit with a terminating cap.


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I wouldn't exhaust the bathroom through the gable vent. First off, you'll be reducing the size of the gable vent. Whatever area you block with the exhaust duct, is a reduction in the area of the gable vent. Secondly. Depending on how the attic ventilation is designed, the hot moist air exhausted from the duct, could be drawn back into the attic through ...


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I wouldn't hesitate to attach the hose to your gable vent, assuming that it's made of a material that won't be affected by moisture. Secure the duct in such a way that the airflow isn't directed at lumber. Drawbacks include lack of a secondary backdraft flap, visibility from the exterior, and lint accumulation.


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The problem can be solved by draining the vent. Be sure to use a p trap to prevent sewer gas from entering. Yes, the problem could be condensed moisture, but it might also be rainwater that is collecting. Either way, a chimeny cap that is shaped like a cone will cause an aspiration effect (like the negative pressure under an airplane wing) which will ...


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In some areas, you can get away without having grout, but the tiles will be more susceptible to damage because grout (or something) adds strength to the floor (and keeps the tiles in place). You may have seen or heard about how some people make really tight fittings with beveled tile, and they don't use grout. This is more for areas that are onramental or ...


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We had such a thing and it got stuck sometimes in shower mode. That's when you realize what a good thing it usually is to have the tap as default, so you don't get completely wet by the shower when you turn the water on. This is the german version, I can remember we had one even in 1990s .. http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/pict/262173333141_1.jpg When ...


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An alternative to JimmyFIxit's answer: Actually, I have a similar rotary handle with a an additional slide-lever diverter/flow rate controller which does NOT depend on inlet flow pressure. You can leave the diverter in any position you want, turn the water on/off with the main rotary lever, and the diverter will stay put. It's pretty common in the USA, ...


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To turn off the shower water temporarily during the shower, you can use a showerhead valve that mounts at the end of the showerhead pipe just before the showerhead itself: [Image from FaucetDirect.com] This lets you maintain the advantages of letting water flow from the tap when you first turn it on (faster flow means less waiting for hot water, and ...


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What you need is a valve designed just for shower only. Not a valve assembly with a diverter, which are specifically designed for tub/shower combination: No diverter here, most any manufacturer that you have seen offering the tub/shower valve sets also makes the shower only units. To answer your question, the point of the diverter valve is so you can fill ...


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NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER use laminate in a bathroom. vinyl plank is fine, but not laminate. you will regrete it for every moment you have that floor. the good news is it will only be about a year, because then you will rip it out.


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I second @ChrisCudmore's recommendation of not using laminate in a wet environment. Consider choosing a flooring type that is less susceptible to degradation via moisture. That being said, the rule of thumb for determining plank width is to shoot for your starting and ending widths to be greater than 1/2 a whole plank width. Here's the calculation process: ...


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There are alternatives to try first before spending more money. See this link... http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-quiet-noisy-water-pipes.html If these methods do not work for you install a water hammer arrester. See... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Z0Tb1SdFGk


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Yes, it is available. Unfortunately the only way you can maintain the same temperature setting without hot water delay's is to also install a hot water recirculation pump. Mixing Valve see this link... http://www.deltafaucet.com/smart-solutions/tempassure.html Hot water recirculation pump see this link.... ...


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This will probably be closed as a shopping question, but a search for "shower head on off valve" gives you many results for valves that go in-line between the shower head and feed pipe, such as this from Amazon.


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There are certainly shower heads with their own flow control valves, and I know such valves used to be available separately to be installed between wall and head. There are also mixing valves which separate temperature and flow, though most of the ones sold in the US seem to put on/off on the temp control, perhaps for some obscure liability reason. So yes, ...


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The blinds are easy - translucent window privacy film is available, removable if you change your mind, and sticks to the glass, so that deals with the blinds. A shower door would be the obvious full-bore solution to the curtain. Curtain weights (or a weighted curtain) (or, if you happen to get lucky and have a steel/cast iron shower basin, magnets) are a ...


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I suggest looking at a solid shower door. Time and money not withstanding, you could consider changing it into a wet room and get rid of the curtain altogether.


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I would check on the type of shower curtain they use in hotels that have an arced curtain rod. This would give a slightly more room. The reason the shower curtain sucks in when you turn the water on probably has to do with hot air rising and pulling in cold air at the bottom of the shower. Try leaving the curtain slightly open at the back of the shower to ...


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What you are calling a floor joist, appears to be much thicker than a 2x floor joist. Maybe like a 4x8 or something. So it's probably a "bearer" resting on the piers, which would explain why they are far apart. Typically you would then rest floor joists across those beams, (or use Simpson hangers if the floor needs to be nearly flush to the beams -- ...


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Aerator Assembly (source) They're all pretty standard. You should be able to find one at your local hardware store. Or, buy a faucet aerator assembly on Google.


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You can put the porcelain throne on a pedestal to raise it enough. It's cheating a bit and may cause a few stubbed toes until you adjust to it.


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If you already paid the plumber there may not be much on that front as the cost of that job was probably less that the cost of taking a dispute to small claims court. If you have not made payment yet then you have the option to withhold till they come back and make it right or fire then off the job. In either case you are most likely facing having to knock ...


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Old school: probably not, unless the guy who wired that ceiling was generous with the wire. Cool new tech: Yes. They make electronic switch controls which are designed to solve a different problem: "I want a light AND fan, but my bathroom is wired for a light only." This consists of a smart switch that goes in the site of the regular switch, and an ...


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If you want to control the new fan and light separately you will have to do some re-wiring, and this may be difficult depending on where the existing light is. If you don't mind them coming on together then the wiring part is quite easy. Whether you have to go in the attic depends on the fan you bought. Most do not install from below without hassle. Some, ...


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As long as you have proper drains and a good pump/pit for the water to drain into 8' is not a problem. Check local code as some require a larger pit when located a long distance from the toilet. I think the distance for the larger pit was based on number of levels + bathrooms.


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Claw foot tubs cost more than modern steel tubs by about one order of magnitude, but you sure do get what you pay for. A cast iron tub will survive being removed and installed multiple times, whereas a steel one might need to be replaced in your lifetime. They're ~$150, why would you ever reuse an old and abused steel tub? A used and slightly abused claw ...


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The Hardibacker or cement board should overlap the tub flange down to about ¼" to ½" above the tub itself. Then bring your tile down to around ⅛" from the tub and finally caulk that joint for a good seal. The way you have it now will fail and allow water between the backer and tub and into the framing. Gaps to be caulked should be kept to less than ¼" ...


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If possible I would take down the hardibacker and furr out the studs the 1/4" or so. Even with tile over it the possibility of water getting behind the tub is high and it defeats the purpose of the flange.



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