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Vinegar is not going to be effective at remove the tiles, but what is effective is a bigger tool. Since you are looking to save money, you might be able to get away with using a cheap scraper. It will look like a putty knife but a lot stiffer and have a wider blade. Then using a hammer (wear gloves and glasses), just start tapping the scrapper under the ...


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As per my knowledge vinyl flooring manufacturers do not allow glue down directly to the bath panel.


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For an "off the shelf" solution, just use a door closer that has a "keep open" or "hold open" function. It will close the door, unless it's fully opened to the point of engaging the "keep open" function (or in some cases a knob on the close arm needs to be engaged to "keep open".) It will not do any "open if here, close if there" games. It might be ...


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To be honest it just depends on how many cfm of duct work u already have installed in your home your unit is designed to cary 1200 cfm of air at 3 tons so if you've already reached 1200 cfm you would not have the capacity to supply another vent unless you had one room that stays cooler than the rest that you could downsize the duct on to provide you with the ...


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I'd say maybe you don't, if it doesn't have any exterior walls, which it does, so that's a yes. Drywall is the enemy. This is also a good time to upgrade any of the electrical on the interior walls as well. You're two steps from a gut job; go for it. As to whether you need more registers elsewhere, I don't know; I'm not a math wiz: calculate the heat load ...


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What's done is done. I'd grout and generally move on with life, and only revisit it if and when the tiles start popping on their own, which may never happen. You are NOT a professional tile installer who would be well advised to rip out and do it over for the sake of their reputation. So you don't need to act like one.


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Yes, you can cut it. Use an angle grinder with a masonry blade. I have seen it cut with a jigsaw as well, and a circular saw for flat pieces, but I prefer the angle grinder for this type of job. Cut it slightly long, then use a belt sander to take it down to your exact line and smooth the cut edge. This will (obviously) be messy, so do it outdoors. The ...


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The answer to your only stated question is YES. To independently switch 2 different things you need to have 2 switched hot wires, you would have to run an additional wire from the wall switch location to the ceiling location. The statement that "the light only has 14/2 running to the switch" tells us that one of those wires is a hot lead to the switch, the ...


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Cover wood sill with red guard or equivalent. Install concrete board over sill; going through the trouble of getting it to slope slightly towards shower by building up mortar under it is not a bad idea. Do not red guard the cement board so the thinset has a good rough surface to adhere to. Install tile sloped towards shower by building up thinset on back ...


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These pipes are way too close to the surface. Pipes need to be buried in sand or aggregate and then 3" of slab needs to be poured on top. The problem here is the initial design: the bathroom should have been relocated across the room where proper burial and slope could have been achieved.


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Use your subway tiles, just use two instead of one. Cut them so you split the difference on the width so they are the same size, rather than using a full tile and a cut strip.


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First, make sure the rough sill slopes toward the shower. Measure it with a level; if it's not appropriately sloped, build it up with more mortar to create the requisite slope. Then, once you've painted all that cementboard with RedGard, the whole assembly should already be waterproof. Just tile over RedGard on the sill however you like. Any water that gets ...


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You ask how to stop it from peeling. Scrape it all off, properly prepare the surface, then repaint. Peeling paint is caused by poor adhesion to the underlying surface. Your's could be one or more of a multitude of issues: damp or wet surface; skimmed surface not cured prior to application; skimmed surface not primed prior to application; surface not sanded ...


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OSB was an idea introduced in the late 1970s and caught fire in the 1980s. After a few decades of use, compared to plywood, OSB just does not hold up as well. You would have thought wood manufacturers would have learned from manufacturers of plastics, and moved toward fiber-mat combination for strength and durability... guess not. I have observed plywood ...


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Marek's answer is what I'd expect to do. Thin In order to make the result a lot thinner than 10cm, what you can do is to use thinner support wood on the walls. Since the load is vertical you don't need substantial lumber there. I would also look into reducing the thickness of your pallet wood - you are only interested in the surface appearance and it ...


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Your question is concerning two things: 1. Proper fitting (wood planks to masonry wall). 2. Proper wood treatment (anti-moisture). So that's how will my answer look like. Let's look at this. 1. Proper fitting. I would advise preparing additional support planks going vertically with - say - 1 meter space (that spacing requires additional insight on how ...


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Impossible to know what is involved from the vague description. I can't even understand whether the bathroom is above the basement or in it from your description. Generally speaking, minor structural repair on a house might cost anywhere from $500 to $2,500. Replacing free-standing sewage pipes might cost $400 to $800. If things (like the house itself) need ...


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Can you provide any pictures or a more detailed description? I presume these are normal threads and you are trying to turn the wrench counter-clockwise to loosen, right? :-) It sounds like there may be corrosion involved, which will make it difficult to loosen. It could also be good old-fashioned pipe-dope that is thoroughly set and hardened. A longer ...



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