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0

I bought a new valve and replaced it. All works fine now.


6

It's called a towel bar. Usually they come with the "bumps" so you might have to buy both.


0

after replastering the damaged wall, you can use water-proof paint to protect the plaster. The items and materials used in bathroom and kitchen should be anti-moisture.


2

If the timer is in the fan, it may not be possible to disable the timer without disabling the fan itself. Based on the labels (L,T,N), I would guess that L is the switched input for the light and T is a switched input that starts the timer for the fan. You can test this by disconnecting the T terminal (make sure you cap the bare wire before turning the ...


1

I generally prefer the same floor level too, but it sounds like this is separate from the plumbing. If either route would let you get the plumbing installed (to code), I don't see any reason not to. Also keep in mind that you can raise the floor and run the plumbing straight down through drilled holes. As far as raising the floor goes, the main ...


0

I need to remove a 45 yo cast iron tub for a remodeling job and don't want to damage the surrounding walls etc too much. Pick one of those two, or realize that "too much" has to have quite a high threshold in this case. They don't come out easily, and they were put in before tile, etc was put on, and the plumbing you need to disconnect may not ...


0

A three sided alcove tub has a lip that goes under the tile. It is supported by framing and sometimes by a lipped nail (Just an edge hangs over). Take care breaking it, it will shatter very sharp shards, so eye protection with side shields is necessary. It can be cut with angle grinder with metal blade (that method will require dust mask. Unhooking the ...


0

I have used tin squares on basements and you could get screws that match the tin finish.


0

I have to say I have done all of the answers listed on this page and what works the best is scalding hot water. Razors can damage tile, fingernails take too long, mineral spirits and sprays are too messy. Keep dousing an area with a big pot of water and it will be gone in a few minutes with little work.


5

I agree that the best solution here is tell your landlord, provided you have a reasonable one. What does your lease say about routine maintenance? Chances are if you weren't doing chinups on it, you shouldn't be charged. However, if you've had a previous experience with this landlord in which they've proved to be unreasonable, you could attempt to fix it ...


2

Sad to say, the pot-metal piece attached to the wall broke, and it's likely hard to find the right replacement part. The proper person to call in a case like this is your landlord. If it broke without unreasonable force, you should not be charged. The landlord owns the property and has the right to choose the time and manner of repair (she/he may not want ...


1

I'd use unfaced fiberglass, at least if each wall cavity has a place above the shower where the wall can breathe. Fiberglass is very permeable to air, which is why it only works well in still air.


1

I used hair spray! Spray, wipe and repeat. It all came off!


0

I really recommend Hardie boards vs. other good competitors. They are oblivious to water - don't hold it and break down. If money is no object, nothing outperforms sprayfoam. If you want something that works well but cheaper - Roxul. I have not used a vapor barrier on any of my HB/redguard installs unless inspector needs to see it then I stick fork holes ...


0

There are a number of steps that should be taken here, but the ultimate goal is clearly to come up with a better ventilation system. Remove the mold stricken areas. It's a pretty safe bet to cut 1 foot around them in each direction. Sanitize the area around the remaining areas. Bleach is less than ideal - if you can get a spray bottle of Concrobium from ...


0

If you click on the below link for the instructions and look at page 2, Figure 4, you'll see where the bracket is located that is probably screwed to the joist, where mentioned in an answer above you'd need to saw it off if you can't reach/see the screws. http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/94/94db3ca7-a6ff-40ab-a628-e8aafcea4a07.pdf


0

As it turns out, there is absolutely no ventilation in the bathroom whatsoever: This is the fan. It simply pushes air downward into the bathroom. It is not connected to any ventilation channel whatsoever. For others with this problem, examining your bathroom fan is definitely the first step. Afterward, examine other options like scraping the paint, ...


2

I am assuming that new fan is bigger or same size. You have joists that this is nailed/screwed into. Try not to damage adjacent drywall. I am going to guess from this picture your joists are on the top/bottom of picture. This is because your exhaust/and electric look to be coming from the left. I would cut straight along the top and bottom (using ...


2

Its either attached to joist or there is brackets attached to joists. Look for screw /nail on side of box into joist. If it is brackets you will need to use a reciprocating saw can cut it out. Make sure you don't hit the wire though.


0

About what kind of breaker you need - read the manual for the tub. It will list how many amps the breaker should be and what wire gauge to use. You are going to be sitting in a box full of water and electricity, so ensure those instructions are followed to the letter. You typically need a dedicated GFI circuit breaker for a tub. We have a similar tub, ...


0

I wouldnt use this surround to modify. The crown up top will not look right unless maybe there is a 3" bump out from the wall. Surrounds are suppose to be quick and easy. This one is not cheap either. You should do it right and install tile it will probably be same price if not cheaper. Yes jetted tubs are suppose to have a dedicated circuit.



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